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Science-fiction short story about inmortality gone awry

 
 
fbaezer
 
Reply Mon 25 Jul, 2011 07:08 pm
When I was a kid, I read a short-story about a man who discovered inmortality and became inmortal, only to find out that he became very slow, and time moved fast. The story ends with the man's finger nearing the typewriter and taking years to complete each letter.
Does anyone know what story I am talking about? I've been searching for it with no results. I'd like to read it again.
Thanks in advance.

PS. The story was written before 1970. Probably in the 50's.
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Type: Question • Score: 5 • Views: 1,256 • Replies: 10
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jul, 2011 07:33 pm
Let us know if you find it. Sounds good.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jul, 2011 07:45 pm
This is an off the wall guess - I'm not a big science fiction fan and the stories I read that could qualify I read a long time ago. But, just in case, was it a short story in a Hitchcock book? He did at least one short story complilation book.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jul, 2011 07:49 pm
This is an off the wall guess - I'm not a big science fiction fan and the stories I read that could qualify I read a long time ago. But, just in case, was it a short story in a Hitchcock book? He did at least one short story compilation book, maybe two or three, probably about horror.

The only story I remember was a quite short one about a couple on a romantic tryst on some far away tropical island. One day they got a little bit of fungus on their feet (or one of them did). This progressed...

Shirley Jackson's The Lottery might have been in there too; it was in a lot of short story books. Anyway, the stories were by others but compiled by Hitch or his cohorts.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jul, 2011 08:08 pm
@ossobuco,
Well, here's wiki on his books - probably Amazon has more on the stories in them -

"At the height of Hitchcock's success, he was also asked to introduce a set of books with his name attached. The series was a collection of short stories by popular short-story writers, primarily focused on suspense and thrillers.

These titles included Alfred Hitchcock's Anthology, Alfred Hitchcock Presents: Stories to be Read with the Door Locked, Alfred Hitchcock's Monster Museum, Alfred Hitchcock's Supernatural Tales of Terror and Suspense, Alfred Hitchcock's Spellbinders in Suspense, Alfred Hitchcock's Witch's Brew, Alfred Hitchcock's Ghostly Gallery, Alfred Hitchcock's A Hangman's Dozen and Alfred Hitchcock's Haunted Houseful. Hitchcock himself was not actually involved in the reading, reviewing, editing or selection of the short stories; in fact, even his introductions were ghost-written. The entire extent of his involvement with the project was to lend his name and collect a check.

Some notable writers whose works were used in the collection include Shirley Jackson (Strangers in Town, The Lottery), T.H. White (The Once and Future King), Robert Bloch, H. G. Wells (The War of the Worlds), Robert Louis Stevenson, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Mark Twain and the creator of The Three Investigators, Robert Arthur."


Ha ha, lent his name...
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fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jul, 2011 08:15 pm
@ossobuco,
ossobuco wrote:

But, just in case, was it a short story in a Hitchcock book?


It was a translation in a magazine.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jul, 2011 08:27 pm
@fbaezer,
Hmmm. Probably at least a moderately popular short story writer. I'm not very clear on when sci-fi got separated as a genre - or if it always was from the beginning. What kind of magazine?

Yeh, if you knew the magazine, you could go after the archives, and would have thought of that already.

Plus, magazines' archives can be devils. The New Yorker archive is pretty unforgiving; I've had multiple troubles when I've known quite well what I was looking for - a2k's archives, for example, which all admit is/are not as great as it once was, for very practical reasons - is absolutely fabulous for searching compared to the NYer's.

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DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Jul, 2011 12:30 am
@fbaezer,
I didn't find your story, but a search did lead me to TVTropes.org

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RuleOfCool
0 Replies
 
sola
 
  2  
Reply Sun 11 Mar, 2012 09:38 pm
@fbaezer,
I found this post because I was searching for the same story I read as a kid! I remember at the end, time moves so slowly for him, it seems he is frozen and his lab is turned into an exhibit where people come to view him sitting at his typewriter, his finger moving imperceptibly toward the next keystroke.
fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 11:58 am
@sola,
Yes. that's it!

We need name and author.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Mar, 2012 12:24 pm
@fbaezer,
not familiar with the story, but Edmond Hamilton springs to mind for some reason

you can search lists of his stories here, unfortunately not much in the way of descriptions
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/ea.cgi?249
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