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Massachusetts Fossils

 
 
littlek
 
Reply Wed 15 Oct, 2008 05:45 pm
http://www.boston.com/news/local/breaking_news/2008/10/worlds_oldest_f.html?p1=Well_MostPop_Emailed3

In N. Attleborough Tufts U. scientists have found and are studying a set of fossils they found behind a strip mall. They allege they have found the oldest fossil imprint of a flying insect. Not only is it a beautiful imprint, but also it shows movement by the depth and angle of depression - signs of behavior.

Quote:
The exquisitely-detailed fossil has been identified as the imprint left 310 million years ago by a primitive mayfly that lighted briefly on a muddy outcropping in what was then a steamy Carboniferous Period flood plain.

That fleeting moment in the life of a creature that probably lived no longer than 24 hours was captured for eternity by mud that hardened into rock, until it was discovered last year by Tufts geology student Richard J. Knecht working with Jacob Benner, a paleontologist who specializes in ichnology, the study of prehistoric animal behavior as told by fossilized tracks and other evidence.


http://www.boston.com/news/local/breaking_news/fossil.jpg
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Type: Discussion • Score: 10 • Views: 5,169 • Replies: 19
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rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Wed 15 Oct, 2008 06:47 pm
@littlek,
Amazing. I didn't know the rocks of Massachusetts had any fossils.

rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Wed 15 Oct, 2008 07:00 pm
@littlek,
I wonder if we could find the spot.
A topo map and satelite pics might do it.

Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 16 Oct, 2008 12:58 am
@rosborne979,
rosborne979 wrote:
Amazing. I didn't know the rocks of Massachusetts had any fossils.


Quote:
Knecht decided to hunt for fossils in North Attleboro after reading an obscure reference to the location in a master's thesis written by a student almost 80 years ago.

"I came across a thesis that was written in 1929 and published in 1930 that mentioned fossils in the area," he said. "It's the only mention of fossils within this group of rocks that I could find, and it had a bad picture of it."

Source
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 16 Oct, 2008 01:02 am
@rosborne979,
rosborne979 wrote:
I wonder if we could find the spot.
A topo map and satelite pics might do it.

Quote:
Knecht and Benner presented their insect fossil find last month at the Second International Congress on Ichnology, in Krakow, Poland. The team will present other trace fossils from the site, including tracks of amphibians and precursors to reptiles, later this month at the Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of America in Houston.

(Same source as above)

Generally, I think, precise locations aren't given to the public immediately - scientists don't like when 'amateurs' run across their findings.
0 Replies
 
Deckland
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 16 Oct, 2008 01:48 am
We got lots of fossils here. Most of them are in government.
Their activity level is about on par with the Massachusetts variety.
And I am pretty sure they don't want anyone to find them either.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 16 Oct, 2008 04:27 am
@littlek,
The geologic title for this entire area is "The Naragansett Basin" Its a unique non-marine basin thats associated with the collision of AFrica during the Alleghenian Time. SO we have a small unique basin in Mass and Rhode Island that has small coal fields and contorted shales and sands from ancient swamps and lakes. Its a neat area and I used to take geo field trips up there a number of years ago. Wed find all sorts of fossil leaves and branches but only one critter as I recall.

The geology of Mass is one of the most complex and all inclusive of almost any state. Mass has got deposits from a;lmost evry time period from the late pre CAmbrian all the way to tne present. its a very big desl in a small package.

ALSO, lilk. Mass is THE ONLY STTE, that does not have an official state geology map produced by a survey. (At least this was the case from my last search two years ago). Its ver frustrating to have to resort to individual old USGS quad maps or the "Roadside Geology of MAssachussetts" "tourist guide" (Im not saying its bad but it only goes so far in detail and we usually need much more information than the Roadside series can provide)
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 16 Oct, 2008 04:37 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

ALSO, lilk. Mass is THE ONLY STTE, that does not have an official state geology map produced by a survey. (At least this was the case from my last search two years ago). Its ver frustrating to have to resort to individual old USGS quad maps or the "Roadside Geology of MAssachussetts" "tourist guide" (Im not saying its bad but it only goes so far in detail and we usually need much more information than the Roadside series can provide)


From About.com: geology
Quote:
PS: If you would like your state to do more, write to the state geologist (find them all here) and bug him or her to put something on the Web. I want Prof. Hitchcock to rest easy in his grave. Oddly enough, the one geological survey he helped found"in Massachusetts"is the only one for which there was no state map online in any form, until I created one myself.



The above mentioned map is to be found here.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 16 Oct, 2008 05:57 am
@Walter Hinteler,
That is what i call a "tourist" map Walter. An actual state geo map has quad detail so that actual contacts can be located within a few hundred feet.
The Roadside Geology of Massachussetts is a much better series of location maps with their geology.
Not to digress from the point of this thread, the bug is unique to the coal measures of many states and the world. Also, in these NArragansett coal measures are found some of the nicest specimens of Carboniferous AMBER, some with bug parts and leaves.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 16 Oct, 2008 06:03 am
@farmerman,
I know, farmerman - I just wanted to add something Wink

(Our state his a "geo-data web portal, with online access to all "Web-Mapping-Services" , a 'shop' for digital and printed maps etc)
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  -3  
Reply Thu 16 Oct, 2008 06:04 am
@littlek,
All Massachusetts fossils are in the State House trying to BALANCE the budget.
cjhsa
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 16 Oct, 2008 06:09 am
@Miller,
Except for Kennedy. What's ol' Teddy up to lately? A little Brainquest? Or perhaps a game of Muff Diver on the PS3?
Miller
 
  -3  
Reply Thu 16 Oct, 2008 06:23 am
@cjhsa,
He's in poor health.

The DEMS want Caroline Kennedy to till Kennedy's spot in the Senate, upon his death.

JOKE...these are the same fools who thing Palin lacks experience.
cjhsa
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 16 Oct, 2008 06:49 am
@Miller,
He should have died in 1969.
Bi-Polar Bear
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 16 Oct, 2008 07:54 am
@cjhsa,
you should die before the day ends...
cjhsa
 
  -3  
Reply Thu 16 Oct, 2008 08:22 am
@Bi-Polar Bear,
Eat lead bear.
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Thu 16 Oct, 2008 03:30 pm
@farmerman,
Thanks Fman! I knew there was a lot going on around here, but I didn't realize we were so diverse. I never did go on any geol field trips. Too bad.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 16 Oct, 2008 04:27 pm
@littlek,
maine and Mass have the most diverse and extensive geo horizons of any of the states.

You should, if youre intereseted, for your students, make a list of the geologic ages and where in Mass youd find rocks of that age. I can help if your interested (You teach jr high right?)

Talk about obsessive, in 98,I was at a GSA workshop over at "That school in the YAhd" and we set up a geologic road rallye with clues for the drivers to meet the check stations at specific outcrops of ages (and with GPS units). We had outcrops from almost every geo age .
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Thu 16 Oct, 2008 04:36 pm
@farmerman,
I'd love a list of geologic ages in MA. But, only if you really want to. I know they get geologic age and some earth science in 6th grade. Also, I'm interested just for myself.

We just reviewed the stages of earth's crustal movements - pangea to present and watched an amazing video about plate tectonics. I was so excited (such a dork). I kept shushing the kids so I could hear.
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Thu 16 Oct, 2008 04:44 pm
@littlek,
Damn, edit's gone....

I'd love to know where in MA there are signs of an African plate merger!
0 Replies
 
 

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