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Fantasy & Science Fiction worth Reading/Re-reading

 
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Sep, 2007 07:57 am
Robert Jordan (Wheel of Time died yesterday. He was 58 years old.

http://www.dragonmount.com/
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Sep, 2007 02:13 pm
K.J. Bishop: The Etched City.

http://www.fantasticmetropolis.com/i/etched/

http://www.kjbishop.net/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K.J._Bishop

I wouldn't call this breathtaking, but it was an entertaining first novel.

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Joseph Bruchac: Bearwalker

http://www.josephbruchac.com/bruchac_biography.html

This is technically a YA novel, but the central character is interesting for any age and the bits and pieces of Indian folklore are fascinating.

*******************************
Morgan Howell: Queen of the Orcs: King's Property

http://www.randomhouse.com/rhpg/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9780345496508&view=excerpt

Light--but not featherweight--reading. A very enjoyable first novel.
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Sep, 2007 10:15 am
Sherwood Smith: Inda

Inda is the first volume of a trilogy set in a rather eastern sub-universe. Ms. Smith has done a lot of writing for Children and Young Adults and obviously knows both how kids think and what kids think about.

We meet the central figure in Inda, but this "child's" world includes Pleasure Houses, military boarding school, scheming adults....

I wouldn't classify this as Great Literature, but it is a good, meaty story and I'm looking forward to the next two installements.

http://www.sherwoodsmith.net/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherwood_Smith
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Italy16
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Oct, 2007 04:23 pm
The best science fiction/ fantasy book series is Enders Game by Orson Scott Card.

A boy genius is recruited to military school in space to learn to become the world's military leader (at the age of 10) to defeat the Buggers (aliens)
It doesn't sound that interesting, but trust me, it is amazing!
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djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Oct, 2007 05:50 pm
'Golden Notebook' author Lessing wins Nobel Prize
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Oct, 2007 02:06 pm
Italy--

Thanks for calling Ender's Game to the collective attention of A2K. Ender's Game is a book I've used to convert people who proclaim, "I never read Science Fiction."

Welcome to A2K.

My fondness for EG is just a bit muted by Card's release of several re-tellings of Ender's story from other points of view.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ender's_Game_series

Djjd--

Thanks for your very topical Doris Lessing post.

I'm having some trouble enjoying Ararat. I loved the evocative description of the dry, abandoned beach with shells and a light house in the middle of the Iowa fields. I was prepared for an elegant fantasy.

Unfortunately Candy's adventures in the Other World strike me as a bit disorganized and arbitrary. Perhaps as I continue reading the single bead-like episodes will start forming patterns, but....
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Italy16
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Oct, 2007 03:44 pm
Noddy24 wrote:

My fondness for EG is just a bit muted by Card's release of several re-tellings of Ender's story from other points of view.



I agree. The rest of Ender's life (Xenocide and Children of the Mind) was amazing, however, I didn't find "Bean's Quartet" as interesting.

Regardless, these books are one my favorite series
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djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Oct, 2007 04:39 pm
Noddy24 wrote:


Djjd--



I'm having some trouble enjoying Ararat. I loved the evocative description of the dry, abandoned beach with shells and a light house in the middle of the Iowa fields. I was prepared for an elegant fantasy.

Unfortunately Candy's adventures in the Other World strike me as a bit disorganized and arbitrary. Perhaps as I continue reading the single bead-like episodes will start forming patterns, but....


agreed, i have shelved the book for the moment and moved on

i just listened to a fantasy by orson scott card, titled "lost boys"

it's an interesting story, with a very interesting twist at the end

http://www.hatrack.com/osc/books/lostboys.jpg

In Lost Boys, an acknowledged master storyteller weaves a powerful, uplifting tale of loss and redemption around an ordinary American family's bittersweet triumph over a welter of dark forces, both natural and supernatural.

Step Fletcher, his wife, DeAnne, and their three children move to Steuben, North Carolina, thinking-hoping-it might be just the right place for them. its traditional values coincide with theirs, and Step has the promise of a good job at a hot software company. But Steuben is definitely not right for their oldest child, eight-year-old Stevie. Introspective even in the most comfortable surroundings, Stevie becomes progressively more withdrawn from this alien place. Soon he is animated only by computer games and a troop of fictitious playmates. The Fletchers' concern for Stevie turns to terror when they discover that other young boys have disappeared from Steuben-and someone seems to be stalking Stevie.

As they struggle to keep their son from joining the "lost boys," the Fletchers battle a bevy of more conventional torments as well. Their new house is an insect-ridden matchbox dependent on the attentions of an eccentric old handyman. Step seems to be the only sane man at his snake pit of a job. DeAnne must acclimate herself and the three children to a new world while she is hugely pregnant with a fourth. A woman at their church believes God has given her an insight into Stevie's best interests that his parents lack. Evil hides in myriad mundane corners, threatening the Fletchers and their children. One of these threats, or maybe all of them, or maybe something else besides, may take Stevie away. But, though evil is all around them, goodness is within them, and that goodness will bind them together with a strength no force can break.

Orson Scott Card's forthright, moving prose, his remarkable gift for chronicling everyday tragedies and triumphs, and his uncanny ability to conjure up emotions-his characters' and his readers'-all blend together in a poignant, masterful novel.
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Oct, 2007 12:47 pm
Djjd--

Lost Boys is one of Card's books that make it seem like Such Great Fun to be a Morman. I believe that parts of the book were drawn from the death of Card's son from Cerebral Palsy at the age of 17.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orson_Scott_Card

In spite of the increasing preachiness, I'm very fond of the Hatrack River series.
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DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Oct, 2007 07:50 am
Just finished Dragon Weather by Lawrence Watt-Evans.

While I had some issues with the plot, I stayed up 'til 5:00 a.m. one night reading it....
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Oct, 2007 12:54 pm
DrewDad--

Thanks for the jog to my ailing memory. I bought the first two volumes (Dragon Weather and Dragon Society through the SFBC. I just checked my shelves and evidently either Dragon Venom was not offered or I missed it.

Amazon New & Used had a copy for $1.10--plus $3.99 P&H.

I like Lawrence Watt-Evans and I'm a bit bemused that he isn't more popular.
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Oct, 2007 11:23 am
Brian Ruckley's first novel, Winterbirth (the first installment in a fat fantasy trilogy) isn't quite worth the publisher's hype, but it is a good read and an excellent first novel.

Extract here: http://www.brianruckley.com/latest.htm

I found it difficult to get into, but once I did I enjoyed the characters enormously. There are no villians here and no heroic types--just people caught in epic conflict.

Review: http://www.sffworld.com/brevoff/401.html
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2007 11:28 am
Another excellent book--although it is a quirky cross-genre story:

Leonie Swann: Three Bags Full: A Sheep Detective Story

Twenty-four hours after finishing the book, I'm coming up with a few quibbles and flaws--it is taken that long for the narrative spell to fray very slightly.

http://www.amazon.com/Three-Bags-Full-Sheep-Detective/dp/0385521111

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonie_Swann
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Oct, 2007 12:10 pm
Earlier in this thread I recommended Four and Twenty Blackbirds by Cherie Priest as a very satisfactory ghost story with lots of squirrely southern atmosphere.

Her second book, Wings to the Kingdom is also excellent.

Also, earlier in this thread I praised David Drake's swashbuckling-in-space series featuring a Bright Young Officer and a somewhat older female librarian with exceptional computer skills. some Golden Harbor is a worthy installment in the series.

I'm nibbling my way through Steven Brust's "history" and epic fantasy which parallels his better-known Jhereg series. Occasional I find the echos of Dumas and other discursive French novelists a bit tedious, but The Phoenix Guards and Five Hundred Years After are both very pleasant, leisurely reads.

Frank Beddor's The Looking Glass Wars got good reviews. I'm a great fan of Lewis Carroll and rather resented Beddor appropriating the Wonderland landscape as the setting for a bang-bang, slash-slash narrative of his own.

The book was not my cup of tea and I probably won't read the next two volumes of the projected trilogy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Beddor
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Nov, 2007 11:20 am
Diana Wynne Jones: The Pinhoe Egg

Ms. Jones is supposedly a "childrens" author. Ms. Jones also creates fascinating worlds and tells interesting stories. I have no shame about reading below my supposed maturity level.

The Pinhoe Egg is a very welcome installment in Jones' "Chrestomanci" series.

http://www.leemac.freeserve.co.uk/

http://www.leemac.freeserve.co.uk/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diana_Wynne_Jones
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Nov, 2007 12:24 pm
Kathleen Bryan: The Serpent and the Rose (The first book of The War of the Rose.

This book is High Fantasy and there are times when I find the subject matter and/or prose a wee bit top-lofty for my taste. In spite of my limitations the book held my interest and I'll probably invest in Volumes II and III when they're released--although since I have plenty of reading stockpiled, I might wait and buy them second hand.

http://www.tor-forge.com/theserpentandtherose

http://www.amazon.com/Serpent-Rose-Kathleen-Bryan/dp/0765313286
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sun 4 Nov, 2007 02:10 pm
Lian Hearn's Heaven's Net is Wide is a prequel for his Otori Quartet set in a medieval, mystical Japanese-like world.

The oriental background makes for an off-beat fantasy novel.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gillian_Rubinstein

http://books.google.com/books?as_auth=Lian+Hearn&ots=skWmLp9G0w&sa=X&oi=print&ct=title&cad=author-navigational
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Wed 28 Nov, 2007 09:00 am
I've praised Lisa Tuttle before in this thread.

Last night I finished The Mysteries a multi-layered story about missing persons and persons who choose not to be found both in this world and the Otherworld of Celtic myth.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisa_Tuttle

http://home.arcor.de/anyx/lisatuttle/start.htm

http://www.randomhouse.com/author/results.pperl?authorid=31606
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djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Dec, 2007 04:58 am
Noddy24 wrote:


Frank Beddor's The Looking Glass Wars got good reviews. I'm a great fan of Lewis Carroll and rather resented Beddor appropriating the Wonderland landscape as the setting for a bang-bang, slash-slash narrative of his own.

The book was not my cup of tea and I probably won't read the next two volumes of the projected trilogy.


haven't got around to this yet, have the audio book as this seemed more like a listen then a read

i'll let you know what i think
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Dec, 2007 06:14 am
djjd--

Please do. I've donated the book to the library because I know my taste is far from universal.
0 Replies
 
 

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