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which book is this from?

 
 
kev
 
Reply Tue 9 Jan, 2007 10:30 am
Which book contains this passage:
'Near to the stones and mortar and the stack of timber above the sunken garden the two dogs were standingÂ… I saw her footsteps in the sand and lime, and her sunshade, still open, tipped upon its side'?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 1,257 • Replies: 17
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contrex
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jan, 2007 03:18 pm
Is this a guessing game, or are you serious, in which case, how the hell is anybody supposed to know the answer, except by chance?
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jan, 2007 03:24 pm
Given that this is a knowledge exchange site this is a perfectly reasonable question and your rudeness is out of line, Contrex.


I am afraid I have no idea Kev.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jan, 2007 03:33 pm
dlowan wrote:
Given that this is a knowledge exchange site this is a perfectly reasonable question


Yes but there are reasonable questions and unreasonable questions. If I ask, "Which street in Manchester has three green doors, two white, and four black front doors?", somebody somewhere might conceivably know, but it's vanishingly unlikely.

dlowan wrote:
and your rudeness is out of line, Contrex.

Up yours.

dlowan wrote:
I am afraid I have no idea Kev.


So why bother answering?
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jan, 2007 03:39 pm
contrex wrote:
dlowan wrote:
Given that this is a knowledge exchange site this is a perfectly reasonable question


Yes but there are reasonable questions and unreasonable questions. If I ask, "Which street in Manchester has three green doors, two white, and four black front doors?", somebody somewhere might conceivably know, but it's vanishingly unlikely.

dlowan wrote:
and your rudeness is out of line, Contrex.

Up yours.

dlowan wrote:
I am afraid I have no idea Kev.


So why bother answering?



a. To ameliorate your rudeness.

b. To delineate not actually knowing from the possibility that someone WILL know.


And also to bump Kev's question so that there is more chance that someone who DOES know will see it.





Kev, do you have some context for the quote?
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jan, 2007 03:44 pm
Katherine Mansfield?
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jan, 2007 04:37 pm
contrex wrote:
Is this a guessing game, or are you serious, in which case, how the hell is anybody supposed to know the answer, except by chance?

often an exerpt like this can be found on google...
0 Replies
 
wandeljw
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jan, 2007 04:40 pm
Re: which book is this from?
kev wrote:
Which book contains this passage:
'Near to the stones and mortar and the stack of timber above the sunken garden the two dogs were standingÂ… I saw her footsteps in the sand and lime, and her sunshade, still open, tipped upon its side'?


Some possibilities (using key words on Google):
Madame Bovary
The Age of Innocence
The Rainbow (D. H. Lawrence)
Run to Morning (Jack Higgins)

I could not find the entire passage in any of those books (using internet sources).
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jan, 2007 04:41 pm
I can't say more that a certain "Arro" asked the same question a week ago on The Richard and Judy Book Club Message Board :wink:
0 Replies
 
kev
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 02:44 am
Thanks Deb

Contrex to illustrate just how ill informed you sarcastic comments are,lets try another couple.

1. It was the best of times
It was the worst of times.

2. Alas poor Yorick
I knew him Horatio


This is assuming that anyone is still looking at this thread now that you have made such a mess of it.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 04:41 am
kev wrote:
Thanks Deb

Contrex to illustrate just how ill informed you sarcastic comments are,lets try another couple.

1. It was the best of times
It was the worst of times.

2. Alas poor Yorick
I knew him Horatio


This is assuming that anyone is still looking at this thread now that you have made such a mess of it.


Dickens: A tale of two cities.

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to heaven, we were all doing direct the other way - in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

Shakesphere: Hamlet
Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio:
a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy:
he hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how
abhorred in my imagination it is!
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 04:47 am
kev wrote:
Thanks Deb

Contrex to illustrate just how ill informed you sarcastic comments are,lets try another couple.

1. It was the best of times
It was the worst of times.

2. Alas poor Yorick
I knew him Horatio


This is assuming that anyone is still looking at this thread now that you have made such a mess of it.


But those are really obvious well known quotes. I know this is, in large part, a "please do my homework for me" site, but still...
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 04:50 am
contrex ....if you dont ask, you dont get.
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 05:01 am
Oh, and by the way, in Manchester, Connecticut, the street you are inquring about is Newman Street. It runs north/south from Valley to Center Streets and was named for a local Irishman, not the Cardinal.


Joe(anything is possible)Nation
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 05:43 am
Behind the green door! Wasnt that a porno?
0 Replies
 
Debacle
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jan, 2007 08:52 pm
Don't think so, dadpad. Warn't that a pianer?

I dunno, kev ... it could be from Conrad's Chance - A Tale in Two Parts, but I dunno. You can read it here, if you have the time; though it could be a long slog up the wrong creek.
0 Replies
 
wandeljw
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jan, 2007 01:15 pm
John Galsworthy's "The Forsyte Saga" is another possibility.

Let us know if any of these suggestions help, kev.
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jan, 2007 03:20 pm
The quote appears to be from a first person narrative.

That would remove Madame Bovary from the possible books. (I doubt will be a translated work since the quote would be so different depending on translation.)
Since Google can't find it, it makes me think it is a book that isn't online somewhere so probably not in the public domain yet.

The Age of Innocence is here.
http://www.bartleby.com/1005/

The Rainbow is here
http://etext.library.adelaide.edu.au/l/lawrence/dh/l41r/


My first thought was Henry Miller. (A rather tame part if it is him.)

Do you have any context for asking the question Kev that might direct us? I am assuming it should be from something considered a great work.
0 Replies
 
 

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