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Jerry Lee Lewis - The Killer Rocks On

 
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Aug, 2005 04:35 pm
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2005 01:32 pm
Over The Rainbow lyrics

Somewhere, over the rainbow, blue birds fly,
They're flyin' high, over that old rainbow
I wonder ...why Lord, can't I?
Somewhere, over the rainbow,
Way up high,
You know there's a land ol' Jerry dreamed of,
Once in a lullaby

Someday I'll wish upon a star
Wake up where the clouds are far behind me.
Where kisses melt like lemon drops,
Above the chimney tops,
That's where you'll find me

Somewhere, over the rainbow, blue birds fly
They're flyin' high, over the rainbow
I wonder ...why can't I?

Someday I'll wish upon a star
Wake up where the clouds are far behind me.
You know, where kisses melt like lemon drops,
Above the chimney tops,
is where you'll find me

Somewhere, over the rainbow, blue birds fly
My God, they're flyin' high, over the rainbow
why can't I?
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Dec, 2005 01:17 pm
Jerry Lee Lewis readies all-star album

November 01, 2005 12:09 PM
by Jim Harrington
liveDaily Contributor
Rock-and-roll patriarch Jerry Lee Lewis (music) has obviously paid attention while all-star albums by Santana and Ray Charles have sold millions of copies and won boatloads of Grammy Awards.
CAHoping for similar success, "The Killer" is set to release his own celebrity-fueled CD in February.
The new disc, entitled "The Pilgrim," features what surely must rank as one of the most impressive casts of big-name musicians ever assembled for a single studio affair. The A-list includes B.B. King (music), Bruce Springsteen (music), Mick Jagger (music), Neil Young (music), Toby Keith, Merle Haggard, Kid Rock, Rod Stewart, Willie Nelson, George Jones, Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page. In all, the album features 21 guest artists performing on 21 tracks.

"It was 21 of the easiest phone calls I ever had to make," producer Jimmy Rip said on Lewis' website in regards to pulling together the talented group of players for "The Pilgrim." "Everyone wanted to play with 'The Killer.'"

Rip also played guitar with the backing band featured on most of the CD. The rest of the house band included guitarist Kenny Lovelace, bassist Hutch Hutchinson and drummer Jim Keltner on drums.

In other news, Lewis joined Norah Jones, Dave Matthews, John Mellencamp, Bright Eyes, Los Lobos, Good Charlotte, Emmylou Harris and Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young Oct. 29-30 at Neil Young's 19th annual Bridge School Benefit at the Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, CA. The 70-year-old vocalist/pianist performed such golden oldies as "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On" and "Great Balls of Fire" during this fundraiser for the Bridge School, the San Francisco Bay Area-based school that serves students with severe speech and physical impairments
0 Replies
 
jackthehat
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Aug, 2009 03:27 pm
@edgarblythe,
Edgar, hello.
Who wrote 'Bonnie B'? And who was she?
Jerry Lee said that he first heard 'wholelottashakin' ' as he walked down a New Orleans street....and he took everything from him...all the words, music, attitude, etc. Who was that singer? Thanks, pal!
JackTheHat
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Aug, 2009 05:15 pm
@jackthehat,
Here is the Wikipedia version of the origin of Whole Lot of Shakin. I have a record of Bonny Bee but it will take a while to locate it. The label will list the author.

The origins of the song are disputed, but the writing is co-credited to Native American (Crow) / African American Kentuckian singer/songwriter Dave "Curlee" Williams, and white pianist, bandleader and songwriter James Faye "Roy" Hall (May 7, 1922 - March 2, 1984)[1]. Hall made the first recording of the song in September, 1954 for Decca Records, and maintained that he had written it and had secured the legal copyright as co-writer under the pseudonym of "Sunny David". All recordings of the song list the composers as Sunny David and Dave Williams. However, a Decca sample copy of Hall's recording [2] lists Dave Williams as the sole writer. The songwriting credit has always appeared as David-Williams on all recordings of the song subsequently. Hall was also a Nashville club owner, who later claimed to have employed young piano player Jerry Lee Lewis at some point around 1954.

Hall's version was rapidly covered by Big Maybelle whose recording was produced by the young Quincy Jones, and by others including The Commodores (no relation to the '70s Motown group). Big Maybelle was covering a record by a white artist, which usually did not get as much attention as when the reverse occurred. However, none of these early recordings found much commercial success.


[edit] Jerry Lee Lewis version
Jerry Lee Lewis had been performing the song in his stage act, and recorded it at his second recording session for Sun Records, on May 27, 1957[3]. Supervised by producer Jack Clement, Lewis radically altered the original, adding a propulsive boogie piano that was complemented by J.M. Van Eaton's energetic drumming, and also added suggestive spoken asides. Lewis later stated : "I knew it was a hit when I cut it. Sam Phillips thought it was gonna be too risqué, it couldn't make it. If that's risqué, well, I'm sorry."[4]

In Lewis' biographical film, Lewis is shown spying in on Black American speak-easy type club, listening to Whole Lotta Shakin Goin' On by a Black female soloist. The next scene depicts Lewis using the song without crediting the original artist.

Released as Sun 267, the record reached number three on the Billboard pop charts, and number one on the R&B charts [5]. The single also hit number one on the country charts, and number eight in the UK. Lewis became an instant sensation and, as writer Robert Gordon noted: "Jerry Lee began to show that in this new emerging genre called rock 'n' roll, not everybody was going to stand there with a guitar."

Jerry Lee Lewis's version of the song is ranked as the sixty-first greatest song of all time by Rolling Stone magazine. In 2005, it was selected for permanent preservation in the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress.

edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Aug, 2009 07:44 pm
@edgarblythe,
After nearly an hour going through my records, I found Bonny Bee. Turns out, on that album, no songwriters are credited on any of the songs.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Nov, 2010 09:46 pm
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 04:11 pm
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 May, 2012 08:15 pm
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 May, 2012 08:24 pm
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edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Mon 15 May, 2017 04:18 pm
https://scontent.fhou1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/17426281_1283381948420408_3459370354597782339_n.jpg?oh=ac6ae0a3365f8120017e037cbf9a6c6d&oe=59AC4354
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