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Favorite characters

 
 
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 10:57 am
Who is your favorite fictional character? Why?

I came across this link while researching a story I heard on the radio recently:

http://enjoyment.independent.co.uk/books/features/story.jsp?story=616202

To honor World Book Day (3 March . . . and, no, I never heard of it either), this British web site asked 100 literary types which characters they liked. I thought asking the same question here would be interesting.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 1,483 • Replies: 21
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aidan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 02:54 pm
One of my favorite fictional characters is John Singer, from The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers. I love his absolutely silent, but everpresent kindness and compassion. One of my all time favorite books.
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Priamus
 
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Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 03:38 pm
Desdemona; a victim of a political plot.
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plainoldme
 
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Reply Wed 15 Jun, 2005 07:43 am
priamus -- Did you see the BBC update of Othello, with Othello as chief of police for the city of London? Very provocative.
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Noddy24
 
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Reply Wed 15 Jun, 2005 12:28 pm
I shall never desert Mr. Micawber!

I can live without Dickens' heroes and heroines, but his supporting characters are delightful.
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plainoldme
 
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Reply Wed 15 Jun, 2005 12:33 pm
Noddy -- I like him as well.
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Priamus
 
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Reply Wed 15 Jun, 2005 04:41 pm
Quote:
priamus -- Did you see the BBC update of Othello, with Othello as chief of police for the city of London? Very provocative.


I didn´t. I´ll try to get it if it´s possible. I like this kind of updates. There are so many Othellos in life. Thank you, plainoldme.
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Dartagnan
 
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Reply Wed 15 Jun, 2005 04:49 pm
Mr. Venus, the "articulator" of human and animal skeletons in Dickens' "Our Mutual Friend". He entertains a friend in his shop with the offer of some tea, "Would you care to partake?"
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farmerman
 
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Reply Wed 15 Jun, 2005 04:59 pm
Blue Duck. HE was always a presence but rarely seen.

I know Im weird , but you better not cross me , get it? Unless you wanna be tied down and be lookin at yer own entrails as the crows eatem.
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farmerman
 
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Reply Wed 15 Jun, 2005 05:30 pm
Unless of course its Mister Water Rat who said
''There is nothing-absolutely nothing- half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats"
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Green Witch
 
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Reply Wed 15 Jun, 2005 08:55 pm
When it comes to "Wind In the Willows" I have always had great admiration for Mr. Badger. His abode and Mole's End have inspired the decor of my home.
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farmerman
 
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Reply Wed 15 Jun, 2005 09:34 pm
we have that framed in the pilothouse of our boat and its amazing how many people dont know about WiTW, even when I have Mr. W. Rat as the author of the statement.
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Ray
 
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Reply Wed 15 Jun, 2005 09:55 pm
Quote:
When it comes to "Wind In the Willows" I have always had great admiration for Mr. Badger. His abode and Mole's End have inspired the decor of my home.


Love that book.
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edgarblythe
 
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Reply Thu 16 Jun, 2005 04:59 am
Yesterday I read a couple of chapters from Oliver Twist, for the first time since I was about fourteen. I was looking to see if he ever committed errors of bad writing, as in an issue between me and an edit on a writer's site. I was immediately taken with how inventive every sentence was, never off-key, always entertaining. Time and several films had dulled my perception of just how good this book is. Oliver has always been one of my top favorites, just as Dickens is, for me, the best of all novelists.
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plainoldme
 
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Reply Thu 16 Jun, 2005 07:13 am
Somehow, The Wind in the Willows never came to hand, although I think there was a Disney animation of the book, possibly on the old Disney Sunday show? I deeply regret that, because people always speak of the book with fondness. However, it is never too late.
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Greenwitch -- It is interesting about your decor.
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I named my daughter Emily Rose. Her middle name came from Rosie, the wife of Sam Gamgee in the Tolkien trilogy.
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Green Witch
 
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Reply Thu 16 Jun, 2005 07:31 am
Get thee a copy - the movies are overly sweet and aimed at toddlers. The book has something for everyone, although I now skip the chapters about the arrogant and materialistic Mr. Toad. Read it aloud to Emily Rose and she will always have the memory.

Just as interesting is the history of the book: Kenneth Grahame wrote the story at a time when the traditional English countryside was disappearing and factory/city life was on the rise. The story was his ode to the simple life. He had a hard time finding a publisher because none of them thought a book about talking animals would sell.
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Noddy24
 
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Reply Thu 16 Jun, 2005 08:28 am
My materialistic, super-charm son adored Mr. Toad from the time he was four years old. He recongnized a kindred spirit.
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plainoldme
 
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Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2005 10:22 am
I looked at The Wind in the Willows yesterday and I would like it. The book was $20 -- more than I can afford right now. Also, it was published by a local house to which I attempted to apply for work. They only took email aps but their in box was always filled. There is a rawness that needs to heal before I support them, so I'll find another published.

Emily Rose is 27 and teaches French and Spanish at a middle school. When she was in college, she contributed to abuzz under the nom d'email, "Ms. Roseily."
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Noddy24
 
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Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2005 10:43 am
plainoldme--

The Wind in the Willows--free!

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/289
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Green Witch
 
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Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2005 10:56 am
Did you try the library Plainoldme? This illustrations are beautiful.
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