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Ancient Life

 
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Oct, 2019 06:22 pm
Researchers Make Bold Claim About Human Origins
Controversial study argues all modern humans originated in Botswana
https://www.newser.com/story/282315/researchers-make-bold-claim-about-human-origins.html
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 30 Oct, 2019 08:11 am
@edgarblythe,
About 10 yers ago, the paleo guys at Virginia Tech published a proposal that the "Cambrian Explosion" be presented as an event occuring (and defining) the base of the Cambrian, wherein organisms began sporting "hard parts".
At the ame time they proposed that similar "complex animals" were first seen to occur in an earlier event (650 + MYCE) roughly the age that included the end of the Cryogenian and included ALL of the Ediacaran.
This, having been accepted (pretty much) in the International Strat Conf, staets in plain Wnglish that
,
"Besides the Cambrian explosion which defined complex organisms with their framework (skeletons and shells), we now introduce the "AVALON EXPLOSION" which occured about 75 -100 million yeqrs erlir nd defined the appearance of complex organisms except without frameworks composed of hard parts"

(Of course Ive sorta paraphrased to keep out the jargon)


The "Cambrian Explosion" has, in the last 10 years , lost an important bit of status to the Fundamental minds out there. Complex organisms appear in the forms of annelids and other animals sans shells and bones.AND, as the atmosphere attained saturation in N and O2 , these same animals began having hard covers and various types of skeletal structures.

Most of this change in historical classification is due to the ability to see complex structures within such fossils as Dickinsonia and several others that appear to be direct linneages of arthropods.

0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Nov, 2019 09:48 am
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Nov, 2019 10:46 am
Trying to prove a few dodos yet survive.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Nov, 2019 01:41 pm
@edgarblythe,
lotta dark meat on a dodo, makws a really great lomein
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Jan, 2020 03:09 pm
Fossil Reveals Earth’s Oldest Known Animal Guts
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/fossil-reveals-earths-oldest-known-animal-guts/ar-BBYOPYT
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Jan, 2020 10:03 pm
@edgarblythe,
I was going to read it straight thru but I didnt have the stomach for it.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Jan, 2020 10:26 pm
@farmerman,
I don't have an account with the source. Didn't get much out of what I saw.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Jan, 2020 07:50 pm
@edgarblythe,
new finds like this kinda dull the theatrical impact of the "Cambrian Explosion"

So, assholes were apparently around since the beginning of time. I am not so amazed at that discovery.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Jan, 2020 08:00 pm
@farmerman,
No, but I was impressed they found it, considering the age.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jan, 2020 09:44 am
@edgarblythe,
A dig usually starts out to support a geologic age of something re evolution . The fact they found this probably surprised the **** out of them too.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Jan, 2020 11:11 am
Some dinosaurs looked like birds. Some prehistoric birds looked like dinosaurs, and some birds that are still around echo dinosaurs. That doesn’t mean feathers and wings always make a bird—or a dinosaur.

Wulong bohaiensis was a small feathered therapod that lived 120 million years ago in what is now China, going twice as far back as T. rex. The dinosaur species this creature is most closely related to is (another star of Jurassic Park) the Velociraptor. “Wulong” translates to “dancing dragon,” and the fantastic specimen, which is preserved so well that even some of its feathers are frozen in time, is not only dragon-like, but also birdlike. The thing is that the bones and feathers revealed this newly unearthed dino to be a juvenile who went through different growing pains than birds.

More https://www.syfy.com/syfywire/new-dinosaur-proves-feathered-dinos-werent-birds
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Sun 19 Jan, 2020 05:27 pm
@edgarblythe,
The Xixiang Is one of the few Chinese basal formations I have personal knowledge on. WE explored for lithium in the basal of the Jehol biota rock and the Xixiang has a really good basal series of fine volcanic ashes, a nice hard ass basal ortho quartz from sands carried in the streams > AND, the basal fossils were an index fossil consisting of a whole bunch oof salamander species (All for a little lithium)

Th Xixiang is a very very fine silty ash. We call these laggerstatte beds cau they preserve really fine detail on tuff like birds and reptiles. Goddam Chinese . They always get the really cool teeny fossils in which we see stuff like feather colors. Grmany has several great lgers... also where weve found archeopteryx fossils. Weve only got 2 lagerstattes in North America but one a CAnadian site of the Burgess SHale has some really spooky looking fossils, most all of which died off leaving no relatives (with the exception of one little vertebrate)
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jan, 2020 11:32 am
https://www.livescience.com/are-birds-dinosaurs.html
Are Birds Dinosaurs?
By Mindy Weisberger - Senior Writer 5 hours ago

Modern birds can trace their origins to theropods, a branch of mostly meat-eaters on the dinosaur family tree.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Jan, 2020 07:00 pm
@edgarblythe,
A finding of the oldest bolide hit was finally reported from Australia. Up till now, weve always used the Vredefort bolide hit in S Africa as being the oldest but this one , the Yarrabubba bolide had given us a new trick in establishing ages by using several new means in collecting zircons and monazites . (This report was made in the popular press and Nature just recently but its been going on since 2012 and we had an opportunity to use the lab "crystal collection" techniques back in 2016).
So its pretty good data thats free of daughter lead and allowed the dates to be calculated at several locations.
The bolide hit about 2.2 BILLION years ago, and arly "Cryogenic " period and its been speculated that the bolide (now called an Asteroid) was responsible for melting of the ice.

I think we will soon see some other news about this bolide area regarding eukaryotic life from "Chemical fossils"


0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Jan, 2020 07:39 pm
I f I ever saw 'bolide' written before it zoomed right over my head.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Jan, 2020 07:58 pm
@edgarblythe,
I should be glad I didnt misspell it.
0 Replies
 
 

 
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