15
   

Random News from the Rest of the World

 
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Jan, 2020 08:36 pm
The Puerto Rican people have rolled a guillotine to the governor’s mansion.

One way or another, I think there’s going to be a new governor.
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  2  
Reply Tue 11 Feb, 2020 08:34 am
Learnt with sadness that comic book author Claire Bretécher, who created "Agrippine", my current teenage gravatar, has passed away at the age of 79. Her work was extremely popular in the 70's and 80's. I've always been a huge fan. She was a feminist author, but never at the expense of humour or self-loathing.

https://img.lemde.fr/2015/11/13/0/0/3543/2436/688/0/60/0/d163a79_2792-1dnk7m9.jpg

https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-gcs0Nckse34/VzXm7AYl8jI/AAAAAAAAFj4/Ia2SEpu4DFUIVRZF_CdH00s4SOFxOIXXQCKgB/s1600/b093e2c24d2ee015a2f61c4f2c583e8f84ea50a1_CB-75-01.jpg
So long, sweetheart.


0 Replies
 
Fil Albuquerque
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Feb, 2020 10:37 am
...by the way, Portugal ranks 4th in safety and low crime on the whole world.
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Feb, 2020 10:40 am
@Fil Albuquerque,
My plan for retirement is heading to Morocco. But maybe I'll stop in Lisboa on my way there.

Where about do you live, BTW?
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Feb, 2020 02:24 pm
@Olivier5,
Tourists are a scourge and a plague around the world.
Why Pakistanis In the Otherworldly Highlands Aren't Happy to See Pakistani Tourists
https://imgur.com/qfcyzgQ.jpg
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Feb, 2020 03:39 pm
@tsarstepan,
I was in those places in my youth: Kagam, Swat, Chitral, etc. I worked with the forester corp a little, and visited a lot of placrs for fun. Absolutely gorgeous, near pristine Himalayan valleys: it was something to behold.

Fast forward to now, Pakistan population x 2 or 3... The new middle class endowed with some money and the same crass nouveaux riches manners as everywhere else... I can picture them taking selfies all over and strewing the place. Hope the damage to these remarkable sites remains localized.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 21 Feb, 2020 05:29 am
@Olivier5,
Germany: Mini-dinosaur fossil discovery hailed as 'sensation'
Quote:
The skull of a 10-centimeter-long dinosaur has been discovered in a German quarry. The 240 million-year-old fossil may offer insight into the evolution of modern lizards.

The tiny skull of a miniature dinosaur has been discovered in Germany, scientists from the Stuttgart Natural History Museum announced on Thursday.

The fossil was found in a quarry in the town of Vellberg in the state of Baden-Wurttemberg, and belongs to a new type of dinosaur of around 10 centimeters (3.9 inches) in length. The creature is believed to have lived around 240 million years ago.

"It is a scientific sensation," said paleontologist Rainer Schoch. The miniature skull shows a great deal of similarities to modern-day lizards and snakes.

"The little animal is exciting, because we know so little about the ancestors of lizards and snakes," Schoch explained. "We have discovered a new species."

The "mini-dinosaur" has been given the scientific name Vellbergia bartholomaei, after the name of the town where it was discovered and the fossil collector Alfred Bartholomä.

The creature existed on earth around 20 million years before large dinosaurs evolved. The 12-millimeter long skull was examined under a tomograph to determine how the dinosaur ate and the size of its brain.


https://i.imgur.com/huFBAn6.jpg
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Feb, 2020 09:42 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Residents of a Swiss village have been told they may have to leave their homes for over a decade while a nearby World War II munitions store is cleared out.

Plans unveiled to clear Swiss former ammo depot
Quote:
Residents of the village of Mitholz in the Bernese Alps may have to leave their homes for ten years due to a large-scale operation to clean up and secure an old ammunition depot containing 3,500 tonnes of ammunition and explosives, authorities have said.

Preparations for the operation will also last a decade, with costs expected to run to over a billion francs, Defence Minister Viola Amherd said on Tuesday in Mitholz.

The plans for clearance come after a report by the Federal Office for the Environmentexternal link concluded last year that the 3,500 tonnes of ammunition and explosives stored in the underground site posed a bigger danger than previously assumed.

The defence ministry says that never before has a former weapons stockpile been cleared under such difficult conditions.

For example, the ‘Dreispitz’ rock formation which covers the stockpile is unstable and can only be removed in layers; while a new road may also need to be built to ensure that the towns of Kandersteg and the municipality of Kandergrund remain connected.

Meanwhile, some 170 residents of the village may have to leave their homes to facilitate the clearance, but not until 2031 at the earliest, when the preparation work is completed.

A contingency plan of covering the whole area with rock and burying the ammunition remains an option, but is neither the preferred choice of authorities nor of residents, who do not wish to leave “a toxic gift for descendants”, as project manager Hanspeter Aellig said at a media conference on Tuesday.

The Mitholz site was the scene of a tragedy in 1947, when 7,000 tonnes of explosives in the underground depot, which consisted of six rooms under a mountain connected by a trans-alpine railway tunnel, exploded and killed nine people.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Mar, 2020 10:30 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
After decades of pressure from historians and Jewish groups, the Vatican on Monday began allowing scholars access to the archives of Pope Pius XII, the controversial World War II-era pontiff.

Roman Catholic Church officials have always insisted that Pius did everything possible to save Jewish lives. But he remained publicly silent while some 6 million Jews were killed in the Holocaust.

More than 150 scholars have applied to study documents covering his papacy, which lasted from 1939 to 1958. Typically, the Vatican waits 70 years after the end of a pontificate to open its archives to scholars.

Vatican Opens Archives Of World War II-Era Pope Pius XII
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 3 Mar, 2020 11:02 am
@tsarstepan,
From the Vatican embassy in Switzerland, German scientists from the Catholic Theological Faculty of the University of Münster have already found photos of the murder of Jews in the East. "That means they knew what was happening here due to those photos."

Some of the hoped-for documents were not there, such as Pius' Christmas address from 1942, "We're interested in this now, where did it go? One had to "exercise patience", it was a work "like digging up Troy". The Vatican archives staff were very cooperatively helping.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2020 12:26 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Italian village residents find Lambrusco wine coming out of their taps
Quote:
People living in a small village near Modena, in the northern region of Emilia-Romagna, got a surprise on Wednesday when they turned on their kitchen taps and got wine instead of water.
Not a miracle, but a fault at a nearby winery meant wine had accidentally been pumped into the local water supply, technicians later discovered.

Residents said the smell of the pink liquid coming out of their taps was unmistakably that of the locally-produced Lambrusco Grasparossa, local newspaper Gazzetta di Modena reported.

The wine ended up being piped into homes in the Castelvetro area of Modena from the nearby Settecani winery after a “technical fault” in one of the winery's silos meant wine was leaking into its water pipes. As the wine reportedly had a higher pressure than the water in the pipes, it began to run through the system and into nearby homes.

The local water board quickly sent technicians to put things back to normal – but not before residents “bottled as much of the precious liquid as they could,” wrote the Gazzetta di Modena, “to enjoy later at a lunch or dinner along with other typical Modenese specialties.”

The local council issued an apology for the incident on Facebook, and while some village residents voiced concern about the safety of their water supply, other complaints were directed at the council and local water company for fixing the problem too quickly.

Though Lambrusco doesn't have the best reputation abroad, Modena's Lambrusco DOC is a well-regarded lightly sparkling red wine with a complex flavour and a history dating back to Etruscan times.


0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2020 04:59 pm
 https://i.redd.it/9y402hnwp5k41.jpg
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2020 07:46 am
@Olivier5,
Becoming a Dane is not possible at the moment

The Ministry of Foreigners and Integration has instructed the municipalities to cancel all naturalisation ceremonies and postpone them indefinitely.
For a year now, the law has stipulated that new citizens must shake the hand of an official at the ceremony.
However, because of Corona, shaking hands is dispensed in Denmark.

Report on the official ministry's website (in Danish) The Ministry recommends the municipalities to postpone the constitutional ceremonies
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Mar, 2020 03:40 am
'Dead Sea Scrolls' at the Museum of the Bible are all forgeries

Months of testing confirm earlier suspicions that the fragments were made in modern times. What happens next?

BY MICHAEL GRESHKO

PUBLISHED MARCH 13, 2020

WASHINGTON, D.C.On the fourth floor of the Museum of the Bible, a sweeping permanent exhibit tells the story of how the ancient scripture became the world’s most popular book. A warmly lit sanctum at the exhibit’s heart reveals some of the museum’s most prized possessions: fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls, ancient texts that include the oldest known surviving copies of the Hebrew Bible.

But now, the Washington, D.C. museum has confirmed a bitter truth about the fragments’ authenticity. On Friday, independent researchers funded by the Museum of the Bible announced that all 16 of the museum’s Dead Sea Scroll fragments are modern forgeries that duped outside collectors, the museum’s founder, and some of the world’s leading biblical scholars. Officials unveiled the findings at an academic conference hosted by the museum.

“The Museum of the Bible is trying to be as transparent as possible,” says CEO Harry Hargrave. “We’re victims—we’re victims of misrepresentation, we’re victims of fraud.”

In a report spanning more than 200 pages, a team of researchers led by art fraud investigator Colette Loll found that while the pieces are probably made of ancient leather, they were inked in modern times and modified to resemble real Dead Sea Scrolls. “These fragments were manipulated with the intent to deceive,” Loll says.

The new findings don’t cast doubt on the 100,000 real Dead Sea Scroll fragments, most of which lie in the Shrine of the Book, part of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem. However, the report’s findings raise grave questions about the “post-2002” Dead Sea Scroll fragments, a group of some 70 snippets of biblical text that entered the antiquities market in the 2000s. Even before the new report, some scholars believed that most to all of the post-2002 fragments were modern fakes.
...
Since its 2017 opening, the Museum of the Bible has funded research into the pieces and sent off five fragments to Germany’s Federal Institute for Materials Research for testing. In late 2018, the museum announced the results to the world: All five tested fragments were probably modern forgeries.

But what of the other 11 fragments? And how had the forgers managed to fool the world’s leading Dead Sea Scroll scholars and the Museum of the Bible? ...

To find out more about its fragments, the Museum of the Bible reached out to Loll and her company, Art Fraud Insights, in February 2019 and charged her with conducting a thorough physical and chemical investigation of all 16 pieces. Loll was no stranger to fakes and forgeries. After getting her master’s in art history at George Washington University, Loll went on to study international art crime, run forgery investigations, and train federal agents on matters of cultural heritage.

Loll insisted on independence. Not only would the Museum of the Bible have no say on the team’s findings, her report would be final—and would have to be released to the public. The Museum of the Bible agreed to the terms. “Honestly, I’ve never worked with a museum that was so up-front,” Loll says.

Loll quickly assembled a team of five conservators and scientists. From February to October, the team periodically visited the museum and pulled together their findings. By the time their report was finalized in November 2019, the researchers were unanimous. All 16 fragments appeared to be modern forgeries.

First, the team concluded that the fragments were seemingly made of the wrong material. Nearly all the authentic Dead Sea Scrolls fragments are made of tanned or lightly tanned parchment, but at least 15 of the Museum of the Bible’s fragments were made of leather, which is thicker, bumpier, and more fibrous.

The team’s best guess is that the leather itself is ancient, recovered from scraps found in the Judean desert or elsewhere. One tantalizing possibility is that they come from ancient leather shoes or sandals. One of the fragments has a row of what look like artificially made holes, somewhat similar to those found in Roman-era shoes.

In addition, testing led by Jennifer Mass, the president of Scientific Analysis of Fine Art, showed that the forger soaked the fragments in an amber-colored concoction, most likely an animal-skin glue. The treatment not only stabilized the leather and smoothed out the writing surface, but it also mimicked a signature, glue-like feature of the real Dead Sea Scrolls. After millennia of exposure, collagen in the ancient parchment broke down to form gelatin, which hardened to give some parts of authentic fragments a gummy, glue-soaked appearance.

Most damningly, careful microscopic analysis showed that the fragments’ scripture was painted onto already ancient leather. On many of the pieces, suspiciously shiny ink pools in cracks and waterfalls off of torn edges that wouldn’t have been present when the leather was new. On others, the forgers’ brushstrokes clearly overlie the ancient leather’s bumpy mineral crust. ...

Around 2002, antiquities dealers and biblical scholars started to unveil snippets of biblical text that looked like long-lost pieces of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Many of the shriveled brown fragments—most no bigger than large coins—reportedly traced back to the Kandos, who were rumored to be selling pieces they had long ago spirited away to a vault in Switzerland.

By decade’s end, the trickle of post-2002 fragments turned into a flood of at least 70 pieces. Collectors and museums jumped at the chance to own the oldest known biblical texts, including Museum of the Bible founder Steve Green, the president of Hobby Lobby. Starting in 2009, Green and Hobby Lobby spent a fortune buying up biblical manuscripts and artifacts to seed what would become the Museum of the Bible’s collection. From 2009 to 2014, Green bought a total of 16 Dead Sea Scroll fragments in four batches, including seven fragments he bought directly from William Kando, the elder Kando’s son.

Initially, some Dead Sea Scroll experts thought the post-2002 pieces, including Green’s, were the real deal. In 2016, leading biblical scholars published a book on the Museum of the Bible’s fragments, dating them to the time of the Dead Sea Scrolls. But months before that book’s publication, doubt had started to creep into some scholars’ minds.

In 2016, researchers including Justnes and Kipp Davis, a scholar at Canada’s Trinity Western University who co-edited the 2016 book, began discussing signs that some post-2002 fragments in Norway had been faked. Davis then published evidence in 2017 that cast doubt on two Museum of the Bible fragments, including one that was on display when the museum opened in 2017. One fragment’s lettering squeezed into a corner that wouldn’t have existed when the writing surface was new. Another appeared to have a Greek letter alpha where a 1930s reference Hebrew Bible used an alpha to flag a footnote.

In the wake of the new report, researchers say they must next focus on the fragments’ convoluted routes through the global antiquities trade. “When you have a deceiver and a believer, it’s an intimate dance,” Loll says. “You don’t need as much of a knowledge of the materials as you need a knowledge of the marketplace.”

Despite being purchased at four different times from four different people, the report finds that all 16 of the Museum of the Bible’s Dead Sea Scroll fragments were forged the same way—which strongly suggests that the forged fragments share a common source. However, the identity of the forger or forgers remains unknown. ...

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/2020/03/museum-of-the-bible-dead-sea-scrolls-forgeries/
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Mar, 2020 08:10 am
@Olivier5,
There's a sucker born every minute.
Olivier5
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Mar, 2020 04:55 pm
@chai2,
I once bought a fake carved whale tooth on a flea market. It was plastic. Still have it.
Olivier5
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Mar, 2020 04:58 pm
@chai2,
Meet Colette Loll, hero of this detective story:

https://ssl.c.photoshelter.com/img-get2/I0000EC2GOyK_OrA/fit=1000x750/g=G00001UyC9YQPzbw/Colette-Loll.jpg
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2020 08:02 am
@Olivier5,
Olivier5 wrote:

I once bought a fake carved whale tooth on a flea market. It was plastic. Still have it.

I just hope that you weren't basing an entire theological system around this once-supposed relic. Wink
Olivier5
 
  3  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2020 11:24 am
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:

Olivier5 wrote:

I once bought a fake carved whale tooth on a flea market. It was plastic. Still have it.

I just hope that you weren't basing an entire theological system around this once-supposed relic. Wink

I was planning to... A great white whale would have been the boss. Even made a drawing of it...

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7b/Moby_Dick_p510_illustration.jpg
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 Mar, 2020 12:20 pm
@Olivier5,
Baarle-Nassau, in the Netherlands, and Baarle-Hertog, in Belgium, form a series of small enclaves that fit together like a puzzle. Thanks to historic treaties, agreements, and land sales, the division between the two towns is more than a bit wonky.
In the end, the town was not divided in any logical way. It was split into bits and pieces of countries criss-crossing each other so randomly that the borders often run through gardens and houses. One minute you might be walking down a street in Belgium, and the next minute you’ll suddenly find yourself in the Netherlands.

A store on the Belgium-Netherlands border takes unique approach to crisis
https://i.imgur.com/yb6gyyol.jpg

Shop shuts Belgian half over Covid-19 but keeps Dutch half open
Quote:
The owners of a clothing store straddling the border between Belgium and the Netherlands have been forced to close half their shop and cordon it off to halt the spread of the coronavirus – while cheerfully keeping the part on Dutch territory open for business.

The Zeeman store in the municipality of Baarle-Nassau, where the border splits streets in half, took the unique approach after the Belgian federal government ordered the shuttering of all non-essential stores.

None of the clothes on the Belgian side of the shop are available for purchase but the half of the store in the Netherlands continues to welcome customers as the Dutch government has only called for social distancing.

A cordon has been erected within the shop to ensure that customers respect the national measures.

Marjon De Hoon, the mayor of the Dutch municipality of Baarle-Nassau, told the Dutch broadcaster VRT: “The square metres in Belgium just follow the Belgian measures. The square metres in the Netherlands, follow the Dutch measures.”

A spokesman for Zeeman said that many of the big-selling items, including baby clothes, were available on the Dutch side but confirmed that men’s shirts were on the Belgian side and therefore strictly not for sale.

She said: “We show our solidarity with Belgium by keeping our store closed on that side. It is definitely not ideal, but we are happy that we can now provide customers with the necessary things.”

Asked by the regional television broadcaster Omroep Brabant about the availability of the goods on show on the Belgian side, the spokesperson said: “Those people have to [buy] that via the website or another store, unfortunately. These are crazy times, we have looked for a solution in which we can still be of use to society.”
 

Related Topics

Currency - Question by itsshiva1
I'm in love with a Criminal - Discussion by daverod
How many persons can look similar - Discussion by daverod
Complex and Simple - Discussion by daverod
How can you say that all is well? - Discussion by daverod
Means - Discussion by daverod
Stumpy Brown - Discussion by daverod
Postcards from Home - Discussion by McGentrix
Trump proves himself a paper tiger - Discussion by katsung47
 
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 11/27/2020 at 01:53:49