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Democratic nominee for 2020 US presidential election

 
 
Reply Sat 29 Sep, 2018 07:02 am
I am hoping for a Democratic candidate who can lead the country forward while bringing the different ideological sides in the US together. My hope is that we someone who can reach out to many parts of the political landscape, and has a presidency that pulls us together rather than pitting one side against the other.

Elizabeth Warren is considered the front runner by many. I like her, and I think she is responsible and can rise above the fray. I am worried that she can pull in middle America, although her message of economic fairness might resonate. I would support a Warren candidacy.

For some reason, I can't take the idea of President Joe Biden seriously. I don't know what he would stand for or how he would pull us together.

I think Kristen Gillebrand will Hillary II (I consider that a bad thing). She is dogmatic and I think her candidacy would be divisive.

My first impression of Kamala Harris is similar to Gillebrand. I am keeping an open mind on her.

I am interested to see if Cory Booker rise to the occasion. He doesn't see ready, and I don't know if he can reach middle America. I want to see how he presents himself when he starts campaigning in earnest.

Right now, I think Elizabeth Warren is my choice. Is there anyone else on the radar I should be watching?
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Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 821 • Replies: 12
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KingReef
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Sep, 2018 12:45 pm
@maxdancona,
The Washington Post posted an article about this. The picks are as follows:
The top 15 Democratic presidential hopefuls for 2020, ranked
15. Montana Gov. Steve Bullock
14. Oprah Winfrey
13. New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu
12. Former U.S. attorney general Eric Holder
11. New York Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo
10. Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown
9. Former Massachusetts governor Deval Patrick
8. Former Virginia governor Terry McAuliffe
7. Connecticut Sen. Chris Murphy
6. New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand
5. New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker
4. California Sen. Kamala D. Harris
3. Former vice president Joe Biden
2. Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren
1. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders

The Washington Post also released this list in July.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2018/07/06/the-top-15-democratic-presidential-candidates-for-2020-ranked-3/?utm_term=.255ad06eff93
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Sep, 2018 03:58 pm
Bern<3
maxdancona
 
  0  
Reply Sat 29 Sep, 2018 04:03 pm
@Lash,
I don't see Bernie as a serious candidate. I like him, but I don't think he would be a good president at this point. I feel the same about Oprah.
KingReef
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Sep, 2018 04:06 pm
@maxdancona,
I don't think Oprah would be a candidate. She would only be a candidate if she could stop the DNC from being overpowered by the Leftists.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Sep, 2018 10:06 am
Warren is making noise about it; Kamala and Booker have been jockeying since Hillary left the Javits Center.

Wonder if a newby (puppet or a decent human) will step onto the stage.

Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Sep, 2018 10:11 am
I thought Gillibrand rushed to skewer Franken to brand herself as ‘honest’ or bipartisan. I think it might have backfired with the party cronies she’ll need to grease her for a run.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Sep, 2018 10:12 am
Cuomo and McAuliffe are hopefully too dirty to attract the Bernies back to vote.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Sep, 2018 10:13 am
@maxdancona,
He’d be Lincoln. A president like we never thought possible.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Sep, 2018 10:22 am
@Lash,
Elizabeth Warren has unquestionably taken the first steps. I like the fact that she is focused on economic issues and steers mostly away from the culture wars (after giving the necessary lip service). I think, right now, she is my preferred candidate.

Kamala Harris is far too partisan and divisive. The more I read about her, the harder it will be for me to vote for her, even against Trump. She would be an "anti-Trump" candidate at a time when Democrats need to be far more than that.

I don't know enough about Cory Booker to make a judgement just yet.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Sep, 2018 10:23 am
@Lash,
Lash wrote:

He’d be Lincoln. A president like we never thought possible.


Bernie's age is an important issue. Even if he were younger, I am not sure I am convinced that he could govern a deeply divided country.

I am hoping for a candidate who can reach past the partisan divide.
0 Replies
 
KingReef
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Sep, 2018 12:19 pm
I wonder how Bloomberg sits with all of this?

Maybe we should call him 64 Oz, like a rapper.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Jun, 2019 03:55 pm
More bad revelations about Harris.

She seems to prefer old men diddling young men to doing her job against pedophilia in the church. Smells like a payoff. Very ugly.

https://theintercept.com/2019/06/09/kamala-harris-san-francisco-catholic-church-child-abuse/

AS SAN FRANCISCO DISTRICT ATTORNEY, KAMALA HARRIS’S OFFICE STOPPED COOPERATING WITH VICTIMS OF CATHOLIC CHURCH CHILD ABUSE

Excerpt:

KAMALA HARRIS, SURROUNDED by thousands of cheering supporters, kicked off her presidential campaign in Oakland earlier this year, declaring that she has always fought “on behalf of survivors of sexual assault, a fight not just against predators but a fight against silence and stigma.”

Fighting on behalf of victims of sexual abuse, particularly children, has been central to Harris’s political identity for the better part of three decades. Harris specialized in prosecuting sex crimes and child exploitation as a young prosecutor just out of law school. She later touted her record on child sexual abuse cases and prosecuting pedophiles in television advertisements, splashy profiles, and on the trail as she campaigned for public office.

But when it came to taking on the Catholic Church, survivors of clergy sexual abuse say that Harris turned a blind eye, refusing to take action against clergy members accused of sexually abusing children when it meant confronting one of the city’s most powerful political institutions.

When Harris became San Francisco district attorney in 2004, she took over an office that had been working closely with survivors of sexual abuse to pursue cases against the Catholic Church. The office and the survivors were in the middle of a legal battle to hold predatory priests accountable, and Harris inherited a collection of personnel files involving allegations of sexual abuse by priests and employees of the San Francisco Archdiocese, which oversees church operations in San Francisco, and Marin and San Mateo counties.

“It went from Terence Hallinan going hundred miles an hour, full speed ahead, after the Catholic Church to Kamala Harris doing absolutely nothing.”
The files had been compiled by investigators working under the direction of Terence Hallinan, the radical district attorney who Harris ousted in a contentious election campaign. Hallinan’s team had prosecuted cases of abuse that had occurred decades earlier and had gathered evidence as part of a probe into widespread clergy sexual misconduct.

Just six months before Harris took office, a U.S. Supreme Court decision overturned a California law that had retroactively eliminated the statute of limitations for criminal prosecution of child molestation cases. That shifted the focus to holding predators among the clergy accountable through civil cases and through a broader effort to bring attention to predators who had been shielded by the church.

Hallinan believed that the clergy abuse files were a matter of public record; Harris refused to release them to the public.

In her seven years as district attorney, Harris’s office did not proactively assist in civil cases against clergy sex abuse and ignored requests by activists and survivors to access the cache of investigative files that could have helped them secure justice, according to several victims of clergy sex abuse living in California who spoke to The Intercept.

“It went from Terence Hallinan going hundred miles an hour, full speed ahead, after the Catholic Church to Kamala Harris doing absolutely nothing and taking it backwards hundred miles an hour,” said Joey Piscitelli, a sexual assault survivor, who a jury found had been molested as a student while attending Salesian College Preparatory, a Catholic high school in Richmond, California.

Piscitelli had met with Hallinan’s office to discuss his case and the ongoing investigation into the church. But, he said, when Harris took over, his access to the office was shut off and his requests for clergy abuse files were ignored. Piscitelli resorted to handing out flyers and picketing outside the district attorney’s office on San Francisco’s McAllister Street.

Dominic De Lucca, a Burlingame, California, resident who says he was raped by a local priest when he was 12 years old, also said he was shocked that Harris declined to aggressively pursue clergy abuse cases and refused to release the files. “I remember Kamala Harris,” said De Lucca. “She didn’t want to have any meetings.” He went on, “She wanted the public to think this is an issue that happened years ago, that it doesn’t happen anymore. Let’s just move on.”
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