1
   

It is out of sense?

 
 
SMickey
 
Reply Tue 26 Jun, 2018 07:44 am
I've never heard of the phrase 'out of sense'
and one of my buddies mentioned it today,
and I told him there is nothing like it.

Wondering if I was correct, I googled to find this.

------------------------
In a rare press briefing on Tuesday, An Myong Hun, North Korea's deputy U.N. ambassador, emphatically denied his country's involvement.
"My country has nothing to do with the Sony hacking. It is out of sense to do that, and we very want United States to provide evidence," An said.
--------------------------

( https://edition.cnn.com/2015/01/13/asia/north-korea-sony-hack/index.html )

The N. Korean representative actually said 'It is out of sense to do that'
when asked if it was North Korea who hacked Sony.

If he was an English-native speaker, I would think there is totally nothing wrong with the phrase 'out of sense.'
As he's a North Korean, I still have this doubt.

Now, do native speakers say 'out of sense' widely and commonly? Is it more like 'insane' or 'crazy'?

I'd appreciate your comment.
Thank you.
 
View best answer, chosen by SMickey
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Jun, 2018 07:47 am
@SMickey,

i've never heard anyone say "It is out of sense".

the correct phrase is "It makes no sense"...
ehBeth
  Selected Answer
 
  3  
Reply Tue 26 Jun, 2018 09:47 am
@SMickey,
Quote:

"My country has nothing to do with the Sony hacking. It is out of sense to do that, and we very want United States to provide evidence," An said.


both of the bolded sections are incorrect

it makes no sense ...

we want the United States ...
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Jun, 2018 10:14 am
@ehBeth,

"we very much want the United States to" is also correct...
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  0  
Reply Tue 26 Jun, 2018 01:48 pm
@Region Philbis,
Could also use 'senseless'.
0 Replies
 
 

 
  1. Forums
  2. » It is out of sense?
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.02 seconds on 11/30/2022 at 03:30:57