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What is this symbol?

 
 
Reply Wed 7 Mar, 2018 09:02 am
Webster's II New College Dictionary used a symbol I have never seen before. I could not find reference to it within the dictionary nor have I been able to find it online. Very curious as what it is. Since I cannot post a picture here, the URL below will show the picture with the symbol circled in red. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipNsyhpfVOauCAAONi-nstOb1xVYjgGVznkgfwEzqPkeXnnUfgD-mfxPCSquvlMwUA?key=UGplSmNSSW03Uk9SS3c4VnNkVDVGcUNxLTAyRExR
 
George
 
  5  
Reply Wed 7 Mar, 2018 10:09 am
It is an ampersand.
http://cdn2.hubspot.net/hub/469333/file-2693609544-jpg/blog-files/ampersands.jpg
source: http://engage.riggspartners.com/r-blog/2offerings/amper-what-the-origin-of-a-symbol
Region Philbis
 
  5  
Reply Wed 7 Mar, 2018 10:24 am
@George,

... so Trump is going all mediaeval on someone?
George
 
  3  
Reply Wed 7 Mar, 2018 01:23 pm
@Region Philbis,
Italy, it would seem.
ekename
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Mar, 2018 08:20 pm
@George,
And A -Z.

"When ‘&’ was the 27th letter of alphabet i.e. X, Y, Z and ‘&’, the school children used to recite the alphabets as X, Y, Z and per se and. “Per se” means by itself, essentially it becomes X, Y, Z and by itself and. So the word “ampersand” is formed by the wrong pronunciation of “and-per-se-and”. Such words are called mondegreen."
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Mar, 2018 08:32 pm
That's not strictly true. A "mondegreen" is a misheard line of poetry, or a misheard song lyric. This is from the Wikipedia article:

American writer Sylvia Wright coined the term in 1954, writing about how as a girl she had misheard the lyric "...and laid him on the green" in a Scottish ballad as "...and Lady Mondegreen"

At the very least describing ampersand as a mondegreen is anachronistic.
0 Replies
 
 

 
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