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You have six months to live.

 
 
Lash
 
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2018 10:55 am
We’ve all heard the question: if you were told you only had a few months to live, how would you spend your remaining time.

I never had a good answer to that, but sitting in traffic this morning, I think I finally figured it out.

A couple of blocks from my home is a major intersection where I find myself waiting pretty frequently, and almost every day at least one eighteen wheeler cruises through, laden with about five stories of stacked cages—either stuffed with live chickens on the way to slaughter, or empty cages, signifying their brutal lives and deaths.

I always avert my eyes. It bothers me to look at them. It has been this way for me since I was a teenager. The more I find out about the lives of chickens, the harder it is for me to see these trucks.

My income is modest currently, but I pay an exorbitant price for eggs from pastured chickens, and I knew maybe I was being fooled, and my extra expense was likely meaningless, just a small stupid way for me to assuage enormous guilt for not doing something more effective.

I read something so encouraging today. The cheap egg producers (chicken Nazis) are complaining that their eggs aren’t being bought, so they’re lobbying to force more sales. The boycott on cruelty-produced eggs is working.

https://theintercept.com/2018/03/02/consumers-are-revolting-against-animal-cruelty-so-the-poultry-industry-is-lobbying-for-laws-to-force-stores-to-sell-their-eggs/

I’m going to try to find more effective methods of fighting cruelty to animals. We might eventually eat them, but we don’t have to be barbaric on top of it.

So, anyway.

If you ever hear about a spate of mysterious liberations of livestock or chickens, or that some aging southern woman was nabbed in the process of said liberations, take a look at that mug shot. I’ll be winking at you.

——————
I think most people might travel. I’d probably choose one location among the many I’d love to see, if family could come with.

If travel wouldn’t work for my family, I’d continue to hang out with them by day, perform chicken liberations by night. Smoke weed periodically, have stranger sex, and write notes / film anecdotes for my grandbairns and their grandbairns.

What about you?

 
Sturgis
 
  2  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2018 11:35 am
@Lash,
Mostly continue living the best I can, day by day. Knowing my luck, if I tried doing something illegal, it would turn out the doctors had given me another person's diagnosis or executions were finally, um, er...executed by planet-wide proclamation. The hangman would go back to his home and try to figure what to do next, while I was moved off to a new cellblock (since death row would be converted to a penny arcade for the prisoners).

Now if there was a guarantee of my demise, perhaps max out the credit cards, drain the bank accounts and travel on as many rail lines as possible. Start off with the Trans Siberian...


Once dead and cremated, my desire would be twofold.


First, scatter my ashes here and there...or just toss 'em in a creek or river (once dead, it ain't-a-gonna matter to me).

Second, the nude memorial service. This was already discussed with a friend. Sadly, he won't most likely be doing the planning as dementia has set in on him. But, maybe he'll be in attendance. Still need to find a new planner...
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2018 11:42 am
@Sturgis,
FABulous, Sturgis! I loved it!
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2018 11:42 am
I doubt I would do much differently than now, except make extra efforts to let the family know I care for them.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2018 11:47 am
Sturgis.

Sounds incredible.

https://www.irtsociety.com/journey/russia-trans-siberian-express-moscow-vladivostok/?gclid=CjwKCAiArOnUBRBJEiwAX0rG_QM10veLvJFom1qj33Y_DR8KYEbZJgTY2NtSFmV3jrPPzMa-kywMBxoCC-cQAvD_BwE

Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2018 11:48 am
@Lash,
Thanks.


Your comment about 'stranger sex' gave me a chuckle. Just how strange would you've expecting it to be?

...and good on you for caring about the chickens. My obsessions lean towards eradicating plastic waste. Some plastic is tolerable, let's just not go weird with too much of it.
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2018 11:50 am
@Lash,
I once saw a documentary of a few persons and their adventures on the Trans Siberian. It made me want to be there. Maybe someday.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2018 12:14 pm
@Sturgis,
Haha. In one respect, it’s strange enough.

I’d like to be free to approach a man who turns me on and enjoy no strings / no worries ...

I think I’d also like to stowaway in a library overnight with a sleeping bag, wine bottle and candle.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2018 12:21 pm
@Sturgis,
The idea’s growing on me. I’m a bit cold-averse, but it seems very romantic. That solitary train.

Russia has always seemed romantic to me, not the political Russia—but their devotion to poetry, the Dr. Zhivago context.

Those lonely, untouched snow-covered miles.

Wonder if I could stay cooped up that long.

centrox
 
  2  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2018 12:23 pm
@Sturgis,
Sturgis wrote:
if I tried doing something illegal, it would turn out the doctors had given me another person's diagnosis

I suppose the thought of having a terminal or short-term diagnosis must cross everybody's mind at some point. I think it is a shame if people have to find out they are a goner before they change their lives for the better.

I once read an article in the Guardian about the difficulties often faced by people who were told by doctors they had a short time to live, but who later either had total remission, or were told the gloomy diagnosis was a mistake. Problems ranged from the practical and financial - they had often left their jobs, cashed out pension plans, given their money away or spent large amounts on special 'last vacations', etc, to the emotional - your nearest and dearest, it seems, may well mourn you while you're apparently dying, and prepare for the oncoming event, and then feel cheated when you don't kick the bucket as expected. One guy said his wife said "Why aren't you dead?". His now ex-wife, he clarified. The reprieved person can experience strange emotions too. What to do with the rest of your life you have now been given back?
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2018 12:27 pm
@centrox,
I wonder if PETA would bail me out...
0 Replies
 
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2018 12:31 pm
@Lash,
The fun of it is you get to disembark at various points along the way. In one place, recall they showed the locals who sold fish to the travelers. There were other hghlights too. So, you aren't cooped up the entire time.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2018 12:33 pm
@Sturgis,
Sold!
0 Replies
 
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2018 01:22 pm
@centrox,
centrox wrote:
your nearest and dearest, it seems, may well mourn you while you're apparently dying, and prepare for the oncoming event, and then feel cheated when you don't kick the bucket as expected.

Sometimes people who remain alive when they "should have died" are resented by spouses or relatives who expected that after a suitable and proper period of mourning (of course), they would have a nice little payday when the inheritance came through. Children in particular. Also people expect that your close brush with death has made you a more spiritual or better person (see above), and express disappointment when this turns out not to be the case.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2018 01:34 pm
Re Centrox’ remarks, I’ve behaved unusually badly during the last weeks of life of people I loved most.

Trying to figure it out later, I assumed I’m a weaker person than I’d imagined. Holding close to one you adore as they suffer was unbearable. I started leaving before they’d left.

Very harsh.

I’d stayed in and pitched in whole-heartedly with others I’d loved less.

People are so complicated. Can’t imagine asking someone why they aren’t dead yet, though. I did want the love of my life, suffering with cancer and no hope, to be relieved. It lasted too long.
centrox
 
  3  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2018 02:31 pm
@Lash,
Lash wrote:
I’ve behaved unusually badly during the last weeks of life of people I loved most.

You aren't a saint. You are a normal human being. You were faced with the most unbearable and strange situation that most people ever face.
0 Replies
 
 

 
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