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For your consideration: Eat it or not?

 
 
Reply Fri 20 Oct, 2017 05:20 am
Whole Wheat Bread
William Davis, MD, creator of Wheat Belly 10-Day Detox
The Problem: Modern wheat is nothing like the grain your mother or grandmother consumed. Today, wheat barely resembles its original form, thanks to extensive genetic manipulations during the 1960s and 1970s to increase the grain's yields. "You cannot change the basic characteristics of a plant without changing its genetics, biochemistry, and its effects on humans who consume it," Dr. Davis notes.
Dr. Davis makes the case that modern-day wheat is triggering all sorts of health problems, everything from digestive diseases like celiac and inflammatory bowel disease to acid reflux, obesity, asthma, and skin disorders. "If there is a food that yields extravagant, extraordinary, and unexpected benefits when avoided, it is bread," says Dr. Davis. "And I don’t mean white bread, I mean all bread: white, whole wheat, whole grain, sprouted, organic, French, Italian, fresh, day-old…all of it."
The Solution: Try eliminating wheat altogether from your diet for a few weeks to see if you note health improvements. But be prepared for the wheat withdrawal syndrome of nausea, headache, fatigue and depression, and a host of other strange side effects of going grain-free during your first wheat-free week, since there are opiates that develop from the gliadin protein of wheat. Once you are through this process, you'll feel better, maybe better than you have in years.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 3,053 • Replies: 27
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Oct, 2017 05:23 am
Nonorganic Strawberries
Robert Kenner, director of Food Inc.
The Problem: While filming Food Inc., Kenner says he wanted to film strawberry farmers applying pesticides to their fields. "The workers wear these suits to protect themselves from the dozens and dozens of known dangerous pesticides applied to strawberries," he says. "When I saw this, I thought to myself, if this is how berries are grown, I don't really want to eat them anymore. I haven't been able to eat a nonorganic strawberry ever since." Unfortunately, for the food-concerned public, he wasn't able to get footage of these farmers. "I guess they didn't think it looked too appetizing."
The Solution: Opt for organic strawberries! The Environmental Working Group, which analyzes U.S. Department of Agriculture pesticide-residue data, has found 13 different pesticide residues on conventionally grown strawberries.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 20 Oct, 2017 05:24 am
Nonorganic Green Beans
Leah Zerbe, editor at Rodale Wellness
The Problem: Green beans are consistently rated one of the riskiest picks in your produce aisle. In a recent Consumer Reports report, researchers found that green beans tainted with chemical insecticide acephate—and its breakdown product methamidophos—ranked No. 1 as a risk driver for chemical contamination. Its use on green beans accounted for around one-half of total risk across all pesticides and food. Because of this, green beans fall into the report's "very high-risk vegetable" category. And the thing about green beans is that they are consistently contaminated with toxic pesticides. Looking at the measure of both the amount of pesticide residues found on the beans and the chemicals' toxicity, green beans have landed on the very-high-risk category nearly every year since testing began in 1992.
The Solution: Make sure you always opt for organic green beans. Better yet, plant your own. They're incredibly easy to grow, take up little room in the garden, and produce a bountiful harvest in less than two months.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 20 Oct, 2017 05:26 am
Nonorganic Corn
Maryam Henein and George Langworthy, directors of Vanishing of the Bees
The Problem: Today's corn plants are more like little pesticide factories with roots. Most of the nation's corn supply is genetically engineered to either produce its own pesticide supply within the plant or withstand heavy sprayings of chemicals, which wind up inside of the food. That's problematic not just for bees, but for people, too. "I avoid corn because most is genetically modified, and on top of that, most of the seeds are treated with systemic pesticides that kill bees," says Henein. "And let’s not be fooled, the sublethal effects of these pesticides also slowly impair our health."
The Solution: In one form or another, corn is present in the vast majority of processed foods. From ketchup to salad dressing, and even bread, it’s hard to escape corn ingredients. One to especially look out for? "I always try to avoid foods containing high-fructose corn syrup," says Langworthy. "Not only is it unhealthy, but the pesticides used in the production of the corn is detrimental to honeybees and other pollinators."
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edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 20 Oct, 2017 05:32 am
Dutch Chocolate
Will Clower, PhD, author of Eat Chocolate, Lose Weight
The Problem: As high-cocoa chocolate becomes more recognized as a healthy food option, more people are choosing dark chocolate over milk chocolate. But some kinds of cocoa, the source of the majority of dark chocolate's health benefits, are dramatically better than others. In fact, analysis shows that when cocoa has been "Dutch processed" and/or "processed with alkali," it can lose between 60 to 90 percent of its health-boosting antioxidants. Choosing brands without Dutch processing is key to making sure your chocolate is as healthy as it can be.
The Solution: When buying cocoa itself, look for natural unsweetened. For dark chocolate bars, Dutch-processed versions will have to indicate that processing on the label, so be sure to avoid any that list it.
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chai2
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Oct, 2017 02:19 pm
Since taking all grains (btw corn is a grain), fruits except for avocado, olives and some tomatoes out and f my diet and increased my fat intake I have not only successfully moderated my blood sugar, but gotten rid of GERD and lost about 25 lbs. I had the GERD when my weight was lower in the past than it is now. My brain is clearer, have better and more steady energy and my level of joy in living has increased.

Humans have not evolved to eat the cultivated grains and fruits that are grown today. We are not built to process more than the occasional overload of sugar as in finding a bee hive or not at all like todays seasonal fruits. I’m 100% convinced of that.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Oct, 2017 02:34 pm
@chai2,
I quit eating corn. Wheat is next.
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Oct, 2017 05:15 pm
@edgarblythe,
This is bullshit.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Fri 20 Oct, 2017 06:09 pm
@ossobucotemp,
remember, Edgar drinks colloidal silver for his health.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Oct, 2017 06:23 pm
@farmerman,
FM is a scientist in his chosen field. But in other areas is just as prejudiced as the rest of the population.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Fri 20 Oct, 2017 07:03 pm
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

I quit eating corn. Wheat is next.


Re the week of adjusting. Yeah, it's there.

Not horrible for me, but if I hadn't been warned beforehand, I'm sure I would not have seen it through. I'm sure I would have perceived it as "needing" to eat some carbs/wheat. Instead, if you recognize it as a withdrawl process, you soldier on. As an aside, it was never about the gluten.

edgar, during that time, please make sure you hydrate more than ususal, and keep on hand foods you really like that are appropriate, to snack on or make a quick meal. I suggest salads with lots of oil, eggs, butter, and other foods that make you feel decadent, but are whole. If you feel hunger, eat a largish amount right away or you'll be tempted.
Also, get enough rest.


edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 20 Oct, 2017 07:33 pm
@chai2,
I am well hydrated. Have been cutting back in stages, instead of cold turkey. I am not suffering at all. In fact, I feel fine and my energy level is up. For over a week I have had less and less wheat.
0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  2  
Reply Sat 21 Oct, 2017 03:54 pm
This is quite the drama.
Some of it is a near religion, sort of started by Edgarblythe.
I don't have the patience to refute.
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sat 21 Oct, 2017 04:05 pm
@ossobucotemp,
You don't have the ability to refute. Just opinion.
ossobucotemp
 
  2  
Reply Sat 21 Oct, 2017 08:52 pm
@edgarblythe,
I missed a lot of the first statements (difficulty with old computer - didn't see most of the posts) and don't disagree with all edgarb described after all.

Re my ability, you know little about me.


farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Oct, 2017 05:32 am
@ossobucotemp,
All things in moderation. Im more concerned about how seed/chemical companies have taken away the biological diversity that nature provides us. There were over 50 open pollinated varieties of qwheat in the old days. Farmers saved seed or bought from seed saver companies or grain mills that bulked a portion of their incoming wheat to sell as next years crop. Now, we are so covered with GMO "Roundup Ready" seeds, we dont have the possibility of even tasting many of the varieties that our ancestor njoyed. \As far as "being bad" for us, I need really sound evidence that open pollinated seeds prroduce toxic plants.
GMO , s a farmer, I cn definately say, Im AGAINST IT!!.

Ive got a small orchard of ancient Cortlnd Summer apples which ahve brilliant taste that reflcts their German spicey heritage. (Apples never existed in the US till the settlers and colonists brought em from Wurope and Asia.
Mny of these early trees exist in the deep woods of New England where old settlers had lived nd then abandoned their farms. I collect many of those volunteer treelings and then graft them with some cortland stock. Most of these trees produce hit but very so often we get a rel tasty gem of an apple that will make great fruit and cider.

We probab;y eat bead once or twice a week, s toast with eggs or in a sammich. We buy ARnolds multi grain mostly cause it tastes good.

Being afraid of ones food is the latest in a series of typically American "pop"phobias. Ill just enjoy what weve got and try not to start a panic about how GMOs are killing agriculture and killing biodiversity.
No sir, not me.

farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Oct, 2017 05:33 am
@ossobucotemp,
Quote:
edgarb


Sometimes we all engage in edgarb
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sun 22 Oct, 2017 05:47 am
@farmerman,
I'm not so much afraid of food as selective. Let others be guinea pigs with all the new **** they keep pushing.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Oct, 2017 09:57 am
@edgarblythe,
Exactly Edgar.

Sure farmer, there are plenty of people who jump on the latest bandwagon.

That’s not me.

Everything in moderation? That expression is right up there with whatever doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.

0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Oct, 2017 11:46 am
@farmerman,
'Course I agree with you (I do often, if/though not always). I remember worrying about loss of diversity some fair years ago and I've not changed on it. I probably even yammered on a2k about it somewhere in the long past.
0 Replies
 
 

 
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