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Using TBD

 
 
Reply Wed 4 Oct, 2017 01:08 pm
When referencing TBD in a formal document, does the acronym need to be defined?

Example:
Deliverable finish dates are noted as TBD during the scope planning.

I appreciated your feedback!
Thanks again,
Jess
 
Region Philbis
 
  3  
Reply Wed 4 Oct, 2017 01:12 pm
@jessoftherose,

if there is only one instance, spell it out.

if there is more than one instance, spell it out the first time, and put (TBD) at the end.

all subsequent instances in the document can be (TBD)...
0 Replies
 
centrox
 
  2  
Reply Wed 4 Oct, 2017 01:17 pm
TBD isn't an acronym. It's an initialism. An acronym is pronounced as a word, whereas an initialism is pronounced as the letters that it is made of. NATO, Scuba, laser, are acronyms, whereas FBI, CIA, TBD are not. In general, when you reference an abbreviation such as an acronym or initialism in a formal document, you explain it the first time you use it.

Example: Deliverable finish dates are noted as TBD (to be defined) during the scope planning.
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jessoftherose
 
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Reply Wed 4 Oct, 2017 01:47 pm
Great information!
Thank you both
0 Replies
 
centrox
 
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Reply Wed 4 Oct, 2017 01:52 pm
I see that Region Philbis suggests putting the thing being abbreviated in full and the abbreviation in brackets after that, whereas I seem to do the opposite. I have seen both done, and I think I prefer Region's style.

Example:

Taxation of Medical Expenses

1.1 Doctors employed by the State are assigned to a clinic which is their Principal Health Centre (PHC). This is considered to be their main place of work.

1.2 Travel costs to and from a doctor's PHC are payable, but they will be taxed. Travel costs to and from any other place on State medical business are paid tax-free.

1.3 Parking charges at a doctor's PHC are not payable. Where a doctor is required to travel to another clinic, parking charges may be claimed.



0 Replies
 
PUNKEY
 
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Reply Thu 5 Oct, 2017 06:01 am
TBD (to be determined) is in the same useage family as FYI (for your information) - very common and unique to the situation.

There would be no need to put brackets around it.

The day is Sunday at 2PM, but the place TBD for the company picnic. FYI: no booze allowed on the premises.

Linkat
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 5 Oct, 2017 09:03 am
@PUNKEY,
PUNKEY wrote:

TBD (to be determined) is in the same useage family as FYI (for your information) - very common and unique to the situation.

There would be no need to put brackets around it.

The day is Sunday at 2PM, but the place TBD for the company picnic. FYI: no booze allowed on the premises.


I think it depends - I agree my first thought was no need to define it - however, if you are writing something formal I would define it as stated above - To be determined (TBD) and then TBD throughout the rest. If it is informal - like the company picnic above - no need to define as it is so commonplace that any moron should know what it is.
ehBeth
 
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Reply Thu 5 Oct, 2017 09:37 am
@PUNKEY,
PUNKEY wrote:

TBD (to be determined) is in the same useage family as FYI (for your information) - very common and unique to the situation.


as you've seen above, Centrox understands TBD to mean something different than you do

it needs to be spelled out the first time it is used
izzythepush
 
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Reply Thu 5 Oct, 2017 09:41 am
@PUNKEY,
No it's not. I'd never come across it before this thread. Business is global, you're not just dealing with people who use language the same way you do.
0 Replies
 
centrox
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Oct, 2017 11:19 am
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:
as you've seen above, Centrox understands TBD to mean something different than you do

I had never heard of it, to be honest. Where I am we often use "TBC" (to be confirmed) as a placeholder for something that we don't know at the time of writing a document. Or "TBA" (to be advised/announced). I had to Google TBD and it seems like it can variously stand for "to be discussed" "to be done", "to be defined", "to be decided", "to be determined", "to be deleted". I just chose one at random for my example.
ehBeth
 
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Reply Thu 5 Oct, 2017 11:21 am
@centrox,
centrox wrote:
I had to Google TBD and it seems like it can variously stand for "to be discussed" "to be done", "to be defined", "to be decided", "to be determined", "to be deleted". I just chose one at random for my example.


which is the perfect argument for spelling it out the first time it is used Smile
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
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Reply Thu 5 Oct, 2017 11:23 am
@Linkat,
Linkat wrote:
no need to define as it is so commonplace that any moron should know what it is.


assuming that your understanding of it is the correct one could be a bit dangerous - or maybe embarrassing if you did it in a work document that went to someone outside of your home community (ever work with Infosys ?everybloodything has to be spelled out)
centrox
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Oct, 2017 11:44 am
@Linkat,
Linkat wrote:
it is so commonplace that any moron should know what it is.

No one, then, Linkat, is more "moronic" than someone who doesn't share your vocabulary and language locale? I'd be careful about bandying a word like that around if I were you. It might rebound back on you.
Linkat
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 5 Oct, 2017 01:35 pm
@centrox,
centrox wrote:

ehBeth wrote:
as you've seen above, Centrox understands TBD to mean something different than you do

I had never heard of it, to be honest. Where I am we often use "TBC" (to be confirmed) as a placeholder for something that we don't know at the time of writing a document. Or "TBA" (to be advised/announced). I had to Google TBD and it seems like it can variously stand for "to be discussed" "to be done", "to be defined", "to be decided", "to be determined", "to be deleted". I just chose one at random for my example.



I think what punkey also stated was in the context in which it is used - it highly unlikely you are using medical terms when planning a barbecue and or course you would need to know your audience and with an informal note it is also highly likely that you don't run into the "where I am from, xyz is used (wait do I need to define what I mean by xyz) instead - the informality and context would determine whether you need to define it or not.

I frequently have seen TBD used on schedules for say softball games, youth basketball games, etc. I have never seen a definition provided in these situations and I haven't heard any parents or others grumbled....what the H*ll does TBD mean?
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 5 Oct, 2017 01:39 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:

Linkat wrote:
no need to define as it is so commonplace that any moron should know what it is.


assuming that your understanding of it is the correct one could be a bit dangerous - or maybe embarrassing if you did it in a work document that went to someone outside of your home community (ever work with Infosys ?everybloodything has to be spelled out)


Here is my full quote - quoting only a portion can lead to a dangerous and embarrassing situation similar to not fully defining TDB..

Quote:
I think it depends - I agree my first thought was no need to define it - however, if you are writing something formal I would define it as stated above - To be determined (TBD) and then TBD throughout the rest. If it is informal - like the company picnic above - no need to define as it is so commonplace that any moron should know what it is.


By now you should know me enough to understand my use of moron is to make light of situation - you should also know if you thoroughly read what I wrote I stated that you should define it in anything more formal - there is little danger or embarrassment in inviting ones neighbors to picnic and they misunderstand the use of TBD - if it didn't make sense to them or they were confused I am sure they would ask.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  2  
Reply Fri 6 Oct, 2017 09:13 am
@centrox,
Hi -

If you know my twisted sense of humor you would realize I meant this as a joke - to make light of situation.

But we do have a lot of up tight politically correct people on her thus why my comment to make light of something is voted down.

The only serious side - if you could even call it that - is that is very common place in certain areas just to say TBD - if you understand your audience and it is an informal notation then TBD is acceptable. Only "morons" would not define it in a formal business notation where there is danger and/or embarrassment involved.

Good! - hopefully I have offended both sides - those that think you should define TBD and those that think otherwise.

Come on people stop being so uptight and enjoy life. Quite honestly I have posted on here how long - do you really think I would seriously call a person a moron?
0 Replies
 
 

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The Acronym Game - Discussion by Monger
 
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