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Dick Gregory

 
 
Reply Sat 19 Aug, 2017 08:15 pm
I saw a story that claims he has passed away. I will be back with more information.
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Aug, 2017 08:18 pm
Dick Gregory
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Dick Gregory

Birth name Richard Claxton Gregory
Born October 12, 1932
St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.
Died August 19, 2017 (aged 84)
Medium Civil rights activist, stand-up comedy, film, books, critic
Nationality American

Richard Claxton "Dick" Gregory (born October 12, 1932 – August 19, 2017) was an American civil rights activist, social critic, writer, entrepreneur, comedian, conspiracy theorist and occasional actor.
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ossobucotemp
 
  2  
Reply Sat 19 Aug, 2017 08:22 pm
@edgarblythe,
I remember his name, but need to read up about him.
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edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sat 19 Aug, 2017 08:24 pm
Gregory was a student who excelled at running, and was aided by teachers at Sumner High School, among them Warren St. James. Gregory earned a track scholarship to Southern Illinois University Carbondale.[1] There he set school records as a half-miler and miler. His college career was interrupted for two years in 1954 when he was drafted into the United States Army. The Army was where he got his start in comedy, entering and winning several Army talent shows at the urging of his commanding officer, who had taken notice of Gregory's penchant for joking. In 1956, Gregory briefly returned to SIU after his discharge, but dropped out because he felt that the university "didn't want me to study, they wanted me to run."

In the hopes of performing comedy professionally, Gregory moved to Chicago, Illinois, where he became part of a new generation of black comedians that included Nipsey Russell, Bill Cosby, and Godfrey Cambridge, all of whom broke with the minstrel tradition that presented stereotypical black characters. Gregory drew on current events, especially racial issues, for much of his material: "Segregation is not all bad. Have you ever heard of a collision where the people in the back of the bus got hurt?"[2]

Gregory performed as a comedian in small, primarily black-patronized nightclubs, while working for the United States Postal Service during the daytime. He was one of the first black comedians to gain widespread acclaim performing for white audiences. In an interview with The Huffington Post, Gregory describes the history of black comics as limited: "Blacks could sing and dance in the white night clubs but weren't allowed to stand flat-footed and talk to white folks, which is what a comic does."

In 1961, while working at the black-owned Roberts Show Bar in Chicago, he was spotted by Hugh Hefner performing the following material before a largely white audience:

Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. I understand there are a good many Southerners in the room tonight. I know the South very well. I spent twenty years there one night.

Last time I was down South I walked into this restaurant and this white waitress came up to me and said, "We don't serve colored people here." I said, "That's all right. I don't eat colored people. Bring me a whole fried chicken."

Then these three white boys came up to me and said, "Boy, we're giving you fair warning. Anything you do to that chicken, we're gonna do to you." So I put down my knife and fork, I picked up that chicken and I kissed it. Then I said, "Line up, boys!"[4]

Gregory attributes the launch of his career to Hugh Hefner, who watched him perform at Herman Roberts Show Bar. Based on that performance, Hefner hired Gregory to work at the Chicago Playboy Club as a replacement for comedian "Professor" Irwin Corey.[5]

Gregory's first television appearance was on the late night show Tonight Starring Jack Paar.[6] He soon began appearing nationally and on television.

Early in Dick Gregory's career, he was offered an engagement on Tonight Starring Jack Paar.[6] Paar's show was known for helping propel entertainers to the next level of their careers. At the time, black comics did perform on the show, but were never asked to stay after their performances to sit on the famous couch and talk with the host. Dick Gregory declined the invitation to perform on the show several times until finally Jack Paar called him to find out why he refused to perform on the show. Eventually, in order to have Gregory perform, the producers agreed to allow him to stay after his performance and talk with the host on air. This was a first in the show's history. Dick Gregory's interview on Tonight Starring Jack Paar spurred conversations across America.[6]
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NSFW (view)
edgarblythe
 
  3  
Reply Sat 19 Aug, 2017 08:55 pm
https://scontent.fhou1-2.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/20882185_1434025330008029_2991996644611444676_n.jpg?oh=ac7742bc53b99d62102099224f093b9e&oe=5A2305BC
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ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Aug, 2017 09:07 pm
@edgarblythe,
I figure I and others have been out of the loup; thank you for the information.
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snood
 
  3  
Reply Sun 20 Aug, 2017 03:13 am
Hope he rests in peace, but never liked him. His humor wasn't funny to me. His views and message were always negative.
edgarblythe
 
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Reply Sun 20 Aug, 2017 06:03 am
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emmett grogan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Aug, 2017 09:04 am
@edgarblythe,
I want to be sure I got this right:

Someone actually NSFW'd this because of the title of Dick Gregory's autobiography.
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emmett grogan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Aug, 2017 09:07 am
@snood,
Snood, you should have seen him in the early sixties. He was funny. After the string of assassinations in the 60's he definitely was was more of a former comedian turned activist than a comedian activist.

He always struck me as a thoughtful and committed man.
snood
 
  2  
Reply Sun 20 Aug, 2017 09:13 am
@emmett grogan,
I've seen some of his stuff from the early 60's and his **** just isn't funny to me. I know his work, and I'm familiar with supposed civil rights hero status. You are welcome to like him and his humor all you want. I don't.
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Below viewing threshold (view)
Glennn
 
  -4  
Reply Sun 20 Aug, 2017 09:29 am
Razz
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Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Aug, 2017 10:13 am
Bernie spent a night in jail with Gregory.
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firefly
 
  3  
Reply Sun 20 Aug, 2017 01:01 pm
@emmett grogan,
eg, I did see him in the early 60's--in about 1961 or 1962 at the Purple Onion in San Francisco, when he was already known from his TV appearances. He was funny, very funny. And, I think, he used humor to help people (particularly Whites) recognize the absurdity and outrage of racism and to focus attention on social issues which made his routines meaningful as well as humerous.

His unwavering commitments, and passions, did eclipse his entertainment career in subsequent decades, but I continued to be impressed by his admirable spirit and dedication to bringing about change.
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Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Sun 20 Aug, 2017 02:22 pm
Recall him well from seeing him on Jack Paar and other talk shows in the 60a and early 79s. I liked him the consciousness he raised and what he in general stood for. May he RIP.
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emmett grogan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Aug, 2017 02:43 pm
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Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Aug, 2017 01:56 pm
Sharp intellect, intense, in later years his "comedy" lost a lot of his former humor and became a mix of wry observations, insightful comments, and preachy lectures. He was also a health food nut obsessed with fasting to the point that he sometimes looked emaciated. A unique and very interesting man who fell out of or withdrew from the public spotlight some time ago and thus will likely not be missed, but people who were growing up in the 60's and 70's will remember him.
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hightor
 
  3  
Reply Fri 25 Aug, 2017 04:47 am
I actually had dinner with him (and eight other people) back in '71. The conversation around the table was serious, though. I was too shy to try to engage him directly but I remember how animated his conversation was and his grasp of facts.
 

 
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