1
   

Al Aqsa Mosque

 
 
peacecrusader888
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Oct, 2017 02:39 pm
@oralloy,
Quote:
Well, that's hard to pin down exactly. There is no question though that this is the Jews' most holy site.


Muslims always go around stealing other people's holy sites.


King Solomon, the son of King David, started to build the Temple (1 Kings 6:1) - "the Jews' most holy site".

The Temple was extended after about 1000 years by King Herod the Great. But the Romans destroyed the Temple during their siege of Jerusalem. The Romans was declining, and by the fifth century AD, after about 500 years, the Muslims were the emerging power. That is when they built the Mosque when they captured Palestine including Jerusalem.
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Oct, 2017 03:31 pm
@peacecrusader888,
Quote:
King Solomon, the son of King David, started to build the Temple (1 Kings 6:1)


Yeah, this is mythology, not history. Take these assertions with a grain of salt.
peacecrusader888
 
  0  
Reply Fri 6 Oct, 2017 04:11 pm
@InfraBlue,
Quote:
Yeah, this is mythology, not history. Take these assertions with a grain of salt.


Will you call that mythology that:
1. There was a Temple before the Al Aqsa Mosque?
2. The Jews were exiled to Babylon?
3. The Muslims conquered Palestine from Saudi Arabia?
4. The Roman Empire ruled Palestine? Etc. Etc.
oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 6 Oct, 2017 11:32 pm
@peacecrusader888,
peacecrusader888 wrote:
1. There was a Temple before the Al Aqsa Mosque?
2. The Jews were exiled to Babylon?
3. The Muslims conquered Palestine from Saudi Arabia?
4. The Roman Empire ruled Palestine?

That's all pretty straightforward. But when the First Temple was actually constructed is a bit murky.

Records as far back as 840 BC mention the existence of the House of David, but archaeology shows that Judah was a rural undeveloped area until about 733 BC. Early members of the dynasty were probably more along the lines of a tribal chief than a king with a developed capital city.

I doubt that a significantly large temple would have been built before 733 BC. Certainly though they had a significant temple by the time the Neo-Babylonians destroyed their kingdom in 586 BC.
cameronleon
 
  0  
Reply Sat 7 Oct, 2017 12:03 am
@oralloy,
Quote:
Records as far back as 840 BC mention the existence of the House of David, but archaeology shows that Judah was a rural undeveloped area until about 733 BC. Early members of the dynasty were probably more along the lines of a tribal chief than a king with a developed capital city.


And, how exactly they have concluded with that date?

Did they find a newspaper of that era with the day, month and year of publication?

How did they do?
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Oct, 2017 02:33 am
@cameronleon,
cameronleon wrote:
Did they find a newspaper of that era with the day, month and year of publication?

This is something I have wondered about. When they went from BC to AD, it must have seemed like a big change to start counting the years upwards instead of downwards. Kind of like the Millenniums in 1000 and 2000 only bigger in a way. Did older people in (say) AD 17 say "These zeroers with their man buns and neckbeards!"?
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 7 Oct, 2017 02:41 am
@cameronleon,
cameronleon wrote:
And, how exactly they have concluded with that date?

Did they find a newspaper of that era with the day, month and year of publication?

How did they do?

The mentions of the House of David were carved on two stone tablets.

One is believed to be written by King Hazael of Damascus, who reigned roughly from 840 BC to 800 BC:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tel_Dan_Stele

The other commemorates the Kingdom of Moab freeing themselves from servitude to the northern Israelite Kingdom, an event that has been dated to 840 BC:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesha_Stele


For dating the periods when Judah was mostly rural versus the periods when they were a proper kingdom, I assume a mixture of carbon dating and looking at pottery types (each period had their own unique pottery designs).

Also the international community didn't start taking notice of Judah as an entity until 733 BC:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nimrud_Tablet_K.3751
0 Replies
 
peacecrusader888
 
  0  
Reply Sat 7 Oct, 2017 07:26 pm
@oralloy,
Quote:
That's all pretty straightforward. But when the First Temple was actually constructed is a bit murky.

Records as far back as 840 BC mention the existence of the House of David, but archaeology shows that Judah was a rural undeveloped area until about 733 BC. Early members of the dynasty were probably more along the lines of a tribal chief than a king with a developed capital city.

I doubt that a significantly large temple would have been built before 733 BC. Certainly though they had a significant temple by the time the Neo-Babylonians destroyed their kingdom in 586 BC.


So the events that I cited is history and not mythology. You say that their records mention 840 BC as the existence of the House of David. Do you know that they were using also a purely lunar calendar (354 days per lunar year) up to 358 AD when Hillel II reformed their calendars?

Where did you get 840 BC?
0 Replies
 
Love2Love
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 May, 2018 03:35 pm
@peacecrusader888,
- The temple was destroyed by the Neo-Babylonians first around 598 BCE
- The temple was destroyed again by the Romans in 70 CR after Jesus passed
- After that time, Christianity gradually took over the land, the Jews were mostly exiled.
- The Christians would let the Jews onto the ruined site of the temple once a year.
- When the Muslims conquered Jerusalem under their 2nd Caliph, Umar (a friend of the Prophet peace be upon him) in 637 CE, Caliph Umar allowed the Jews to re-settle in Jerusalem. Umar also commissioned the covered mosque building that we know today.

I hope you find peace.
Thank you Google.
0 Replies
 
bulmabriefs144
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 8 Sep, 2021 07:31 am
@peacecrusader888,
In the same way that the 2020 election was rigged. Not that I'm in favor of Trump or anyone anymore.

If that election taught me anything, it's that human beings really shouldn't vote. To vote is to tell God that you know best. That we can have a perfect world through our own effort. God ordains that assholes take over government to let us all know that we don't want these sorts of leaders. To know what bad government is. Proper leaders only will rule when the unjust no longer have allies.

This is precisely the point. You're gonna have to put up with jerks building a temple of your mountain. Unless you want treat them like the Amalekites, and shoo them from your lands. That would probably set off some kind of bloody war though, as these people think they have a right to be here.

0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » Al Aqsa Mosque
  3. » Page 2
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 09/26/2021 at 04:34:44