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Listen Liberals, Russia is not our Enemy

 
 
camlok
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 10:27 am
@maxdancona,
War Criminals: Theirs and Ours
I suppose if I had lost the war, I would have been tried as a war criminal. Fortunately, we were on the winning side.

– US General Curtis LeMay, commander of the 1945 Tokyo fire bombing operation.

On December 3, 1996, the US Justice Department issued a list of 16 Japanese citizens who would be barred from entering the United States because of “war crimes” committed during the Second World War. Among those denied entry were some who were alleged to have been members of the infamous “Unit 731”, which, said the Justice Department, “conducted inhumane and frequently lethal pseudo-medical experiments – on thousands of … prisoners and civilians,” including mass dissections of living humans. Oddly enough, after the war the man in charge of the Unit 731 program – whose test subjects included captured American soldiers – General Shiro Ishii, along with a number of his colleagues, had been granted immunity and freedom in exchange for providing the United States with details about their experiments, and were promised that their crimes would not be revealed to the world. The justification for this policy, advanced by American scientists and military officials, was, of course, the proverbial, ubiquitous “national security”.

Apart from the hypocrisy of the Justice Department including Unit 731 members on such a list while protecting its leaders, we are faced with the fact that any number of countries would be justified in issuing a list of Americans barred from entry because of “war crimes” and “crimes against humanity”. Such a list, of those still alive in 2005, might include:

William Clinton, president, for his merciless bombing of the people of Yugoslavia for 78 days and nights in 1999, taking the lives of many hundreds of civilians, and producing one of the greatest ecological catastrophes in history; for his relentless continuation of the sanctions and rocket attacks upon the people of Iraq; and for his illegal and lethal bombings of Somalia, Bosnia, Sudan, and Afghanistan.

General Wesley Clark, Supreme Allied Commander in Europe, for his direction of the NATO bombing of Yugoslavia with an almost sadistic fanaticism … “He would rise out of his seat and slap the table. ‘I’ve got to get the maximum violence out of this campaign – now!’”

George H. W. Bush, president, for the death of more than a million innocent Iraqi citizens, the result of his 40 days of bombing in 1991, the deliberate ruination of the public water supply, the widespread use of depleted uranium weapons which has brought continuing suffering to many thousands of American servicemen and to many more Iraqis, and for the institution of draconian sanctions against Iraq, which lasted 12 years.

[Read on at]

https://williamblum.org/chapters/rogue-state/war-criminals-theirs-and-ours
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 10:32 am
@camlok,
Would you like to give me a list of countries where this has happened? I can think of a couple (Iran is one). But there are plenty of counter-examples. By the way, I don't think the word "anecdotal" means what you think it means.


camlok
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 10:44 am
@maxdancona,
"It was in the early days of the fighting in Vietnam that a Vietcong officer said to his American prisoner: "You were our heroes after the War. We read American books and saw American films, and a common phrase in those days was 'to be as rich and as wise as an American'. What happened?"

An American might have been asked something similar by a Guatemalan, an Indonesian or a Cuban during the ten years previous, or by a Uruguayan, a Chilean or a Greek in the decade subsequent. The remarkable international goodwill and credibility enjoyed by the United States at the close of the Second World War was dissipated country by country, intervention by intervention."

William Blum
0 Replies
 
camlok
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 10:45 am
@maxdancona,
A Brief History of U.S. Interventions:
1945 to the Present

by William Blum

Z magazine , June 1999

The engine of American foreign policy has been fueled not by a devotion to any kind of morality, but rather by the necessity to serve other imperatives, which can be summarized as follows:

* making the world safe for American corporations;

* enhancing the financial statements of defense contractors at home who have contributed generously to members of congress;

* preventing the rise of any society that might serve as a successful example of an alternative to the capitalist model;

* extending political and economic hegemony over as wide an area as possible, as befits a "great power."

This in the name of fighting a supposed moral crusade against what cold warriors convinced themselves, and the American people, was the existence of an evil International Communist Conspiracy, which in fact never existed, evil or not.

The United States carried out extremely serious interventions into more than 70 nations in this period.

[READ ON AT]

http://www.thirdworldtraveler.com/Blum/US_Interventions_WBlumZ.html
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 04:38 pm
@maxdancona,
maxdancona wrote:
Russia stands against American interests in the Middle East. They stand against American interests in Europe. They are allies with Assad and with Iran. They stand against American values of a free-press, an independent judiciary and rights for minority groups. They assassinate people who are a threat to the government (these are actual documented assassinations, not Right wing wet dreams about Clinton and Obama).

My son is currently serving in the Army.

There is a real possibility that some day my son will face off against Russian troops. This is something that they are specifically training for. They are learning how to face Russian weapons and tactics.

If this happens I will be on the side of the US troops. Will you?

Trump and Putin may decide that they prefer to see the EU broken up into individual counties, which individually do not have a lot of power, and which can be played against each other.

If that comes to pass, your son may not be facing off against Russian troops after all.
camlok
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 04:52 pm
@oralloy,
Nice camouflage, oralloy, typical of you cowards.
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 04:55 pm
@camlok,
camlok wrote:
Nice camouflage, oralloy, typical of you cowards.

You really are tedious. If you were willing to think logically and accept reality when people prove that your accusations against America are untrue, it would be worth addressing you.

But you simply ignore facts and logic and just repeat the same untrue charges against America over and over.
ashwin723
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 06:23 pm
@maxdancona,
Russian culture is mean, resulting from three centuries of cruel serfdom, followed by brutalities of the communist regime. Pain breeds hate and negative pride,

Lenin propagated the idea that communism cannot survive without being world wide. After the revolution Russia swallowed 14 neighbors. After the second world war they moved into the Eastern Europe, taking advantage of the power vacuum, resulting from war broken condition of the Allies.

Mostly, they fight proxy wars; Korea, Vietnam, Cuba, etc.

Putin is very shrewd and power hungry. He is playing international chess with our ignorant, egoist leadership. His aim is to establish Russia as the uncontested bully of the world. That way tyrants would crave for his support.

On the other side, following the World Wars we happened to be the right guy at the right time. But we have squandered the opportunity due to our pride and greed. Our 'Invisible Empire' went after material advantages. We are not a saint either.

We can change our attitude, if we wish, but not that of Russia. Russia is the most threatening monster in the world. We care for each of our lives, while for Putin, a cost of few thousand Russian lives, at each chess move, is not a problem. That puts us at disadvantage.

A soldier puts his life on line for his country. A soldier deserves high respect and affection of his citizens. If we do not have these brave people defending us, we would live and die like insects.

The parents, who are willing to sacrifice a piece of their heart, are above all of us, who stay behind and enjoy the fruits of the blood sacrifice of their children. The solders live so close to the concept of death from day to day, that their courage must be awesome.

And this is our country. We can always improve, but we must defend our home. Against threats our thoughts must be that of pledge and alliance.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 06:57 pm
Liberals hell, someone needs to tell that to President Plump.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 09:15 pm
@oralloy,
Oralloy, Camlok has gotten me to agree with you Wink No one else has ever done that before.
camlok
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 10:31 pm
@maxdancona,
Quote:
But if we choose to do so, we have the right to slaughter anyone who tries to stop us.


Quote:
Max: Oralloy, Camlok has gotten me to agree with you Wink No one else has ever done that before.


I always knew from your postings, Max, that you had it in you to sink this low.

Congratulations.
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Tue 11 Apr, 2017 10:42 pm
@camlok,
camlok wrote:
oralloy wrote:
But if we choose to do so, we have the right to slaughter anyone who tries to stop us.

I always knew from your postings, Max, that you had it in you to sink this low.
Congratulations.

You left out the important context that I was referring to slaughtering people who try to prevent America's rightful role as the world's global police.

Also, I'm sure that Max only meant to agree with a single statement from me, rather than every statement that I will ever make.

Although.... Since I am almost always correct, agreement with me is usually a positive sign. Mr. Green
0 Replies
 
 

 
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