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Sharing black accomplishments, authors, quotes...

 
 
Lash
 
Reply Fri 3 Feb, 2017 10:27 am
I'm in an educational setting with students from kindergarten to college. I have several whiteboards I fill with fun ways to think about math, grammar, reading comprehension etc... Anyway, it's black history month, and I'd love to have something useful for every day of February.

I am loathe to feature the same few black Americans we trot out once a year.

If you know of more obscure black Americans, run of the mill people who achieved extraordinary things, I'd appreciate names. I'll look up details.

Thank you.
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Type: Question • Score: 5 • Views: 1,001 • Replies: 15

 
timur
 
  2  
Reply Fri 3 Feb, 2017 10:34 am
Quote:
Jean Baptiste Point du Sable (1745?-1818)
DuSable was a Black man from Haiti is who is credited with founding Chicago. His father was a Frenchman in Haiti and his mother was an African slave. It's not clear how he arrived in New Orleans from Haiti, but once he did, he traveled from there to what is now modern-day Peoria, Illinois. Although he was not the first to pass through the area, he was the first to establish a permanent settlement, where he lived for at least twenty years. He set up a trading post on the Chicago River, where it meets Lake Michigan, and became a wealthy man with a reputation as a man of good character and "sound business acumen."
Lash
 
  0  
Reply Fri 3 Feb, 2017 10:55 am
@timur,
Wow. This is great! Thanks.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 3 Feb, 2017 11:56 am
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bass_Reeves
Bass Reeves might interest you.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 3 Feb, 2017 11:59 am
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mickey_Leland
Mickey Leland
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edgarblythe
 
  3  
Reply Fri 3 Feb, 2017 12:23 pm
Alexander Dumas's mother was an enslaved African woman. You might be able to find information on her.
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McGentrix
 
  2  
Reply Fri 3 Feb, 2017 12:58 pm
Euphemia Lofton Haynes became the first African-American woman to earn a Ph.D. in mathematics in 1943.
______________________________________
February 1, 1960: At 4:30pm 4 African-American students initiated the sit-in movement by sitting down at Woolworth's lunch counter at 132 South Elm Street in Greensboro, North Carolina.

The four freshmen from the North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University– Joseph McNeil, Franklin McCain, Ezell Blair, Jr. (later known as Jibreel Khazan), and David Richmond – stayed until the store closed.
_____________________________________
I was gonna suggest Bass Reeves too, but someone beat me too it.

_____________________________________
Mary Fields, known as “Stage Coach Mary” was the first African-American mail carrier. Interesting life to be heard here.

0 Replies
 
perennialloner
 
  3  
Reply Fri 3 Feb, 2017 01:29 pm
Madame C J Walker
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Feb, 2017 03:18 pm
You can only highlight Blacks that accomplished something? What about the white Protestant Evangelical abolitionists in the North that fomented the ire of the Southern plantation owners with leaflets condemning the sin of slavery? That was part of Black history, in that it ended in Emancipation. Why not give credit where credit is due. The current focus of trying to find Blacks in history also might imply that no one was on their side. Try researching who was involved in the founding of the NAACP. Were there any whites (a few Jews I thought).

You can also research the change from just 100 years ago when Blacks were not one monolithic group, reflecting the Southern "one drop" rule. The whole Black history thing could also reflect a political postion of maintaing Blacks as a voting block, rather than a diverse ethnic group that is bi-racial, with all sorts of mixtures, not just white. Or, is the truth persona non grata?
Lash
 
  2  
Reply Fri 3 Feb, 2017 08:16 pm
@Foofie,
Foof.

I'm not trying to impress on our students the universal truth regarding race, or the whole story around a kidnapped peoples' social and political evolution in their captors' land, etc. If I were to have that goal on my plate, I'd agree your first ideas were powerful.

I'm modeling respect for a group of people who don't get their fair share of respect in my country, and hopefully introducing interesting, worthwhile people to students for further research.

I'll choose a quote or a very brief profile for (hopefully) an artistic corner on a display in a classroom. I can't "teach" it, but I can answer questions by interested students. I'd like to give them a name and an idea, and hope they find their own truths.
----------------------------
I have what I need now.

I'm grateful to those who helped.

0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sun 5 Feb, 2017 12:38 pm
https://scontent.fhou1-2.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/16507895_10154040742201148_2454363472589379725_n.jpg?oh=40543e32d6700cc2ee98b16271266ec8&oe=590AE580
timur
 
  2  
Reply Sun 5 Feb, 2017 12:57 pm
@edgarblythe,
That's a tribute she "so richly deserves"..
0 Replies
 
Kolyo
 
  2  
Reply Sun 19 Feb, 2017 10:14 pm
Well, we might as well mention the three African-American women featured in Hidden Figures, just out this year.

Katherine G. Johnson
Dorothy Vaughan
Mary Jackson

I just watched the movie Saturday, well-worth seeing.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Sep, 2017 06:33 am
This guy almost stayed under the radar permanently.

I'm so thrilled to have learned about him, and more so, to see a statue going up to honor him.

If we had more monuments celebrating the freedom and achievement of black Americans, it may give black Americans more of a sense of equal shareholding in their home. One little chink against systemic less-than status. We should have so many more. How many statues / memorials do we have of black Americans on public property?

Meet Octavius Valentine Catto:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.cbsnews.com/amp/news/octavius-valentine-catto-receives-special-honor-in-philadelphia/
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Sep, 2017 06:54 am
"If you can, you must."

Deshaun Watson gave his first NFL game check to help a few familiar faces in need. #HoustonStrong

He gave the money to three employees who had been affected by the storm.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Sep, 2017 07:08 am
@edgarblythe,
This is wonderful. I was nearly stepped on by Deshaun at a Clemson exhibition game this year. He was visiting, signing autographs.

How lovely of him.
0 Replies
 
 

 
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