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fetches

 
 
Reply Sat 31 Dec, 2016 04:46 am
When my father goes to school from home and brings me home, he fetches me home. If my father is in the office, and he comes from the office to pick me home, can we say that he fetches me home?

Thanks.

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Type: Question • Score: 1 • Views: 364 • Replies: 7
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contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 31 Dec, 2016 05:02 am
@tanguatlay,
tanguatlay wrote:
If my father is in the office, and he comes from the office to pick me home, can we say that he fetches me home?

No. To fetch means to go from one place to another to get something or someone and bring it, him, or her back to the first place.

Many dog owners in Britain play a game with their dog in a park of field. They throw a stick or ball. The dog observes where the object went, and looks expectantly at its master or mistress. When that person says "Fetch!" the dog runs to get the thrown thing and bring it back to the person (i.e. the dog fetches it). The dog then waits for another repetition of the cycle.



tanguatlay
 
  1  
Reply Sat 31 Dec, 2016 05:10 am
@contrex,
Thanks, contrex.

Then what do natives say when my father leaves his office to pick me up and drive me home? I suppose it cannot be described in one word.
contrex
 
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Reply Sat 31 Dec, 2016 05:28 am
@tanguatlay,
tanguatlay wrote:
I suppose it cannot be described in one word.

Your father could collect you from school, or pick you up, or get you (less formal). Some regional dialects in Britain might use 'fetch' to mean 'collect' or 'retrieve' without the 'return to the place you started from' meaning, but we are talking about Standard English here, I presume?

tanguatlay
 
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Reply Sat 31 Dec, 2016 05:36 am
@contrex,
Thanks, contrex.

Of course, I am talking about Standard English.

One last question: I remember reading that "fetch" is seldom used in relation to people or things. It is usually used in relation to dogs. Is this true? Thanks.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 31 Dec, 2016 05:39 am
@tanguatlay,
tanguatlay wrote:
I remember reading that "fetch" is seldom used in relation to people or things. It is usually used in relation to dogs. Is this true? Thanks.

It is not true at all. I can fetch a cup from the kitchen, my sister from the airport, a book from a shelf.
tanguatlay
 
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Reply Sat 31 Dec, 2016 05:41 am
@contrex,
Thanks, contrex.
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dalehileman
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 31 Dec, 2016 02:35 pm
@tanguatlay,
Quote:
to pick me home
Pick--Tang gotta clri
0 Replies
 
 

 
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