8
   

Dinosaur Tail in Amber

 
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Dec, 2016 05:49 am
@ehBeth,
I was looking for a site that collected the anatomical features and the fossils we have on these guys. Still looking. Im wondering whether that "Beak" isnt a construct rather than a fossil
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Dec, 2016 06:41 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

I was looking for a site that collected the anatomical features and the fossils we have on these guys. Still looking. Im wondering whether that "Beak" isnt a construct rather than a fossil

http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/dinosaur/files/2010/12/sinornithomimus-skull.jpg
Isn't this from Smithsonian mag accurate?
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Dec, 2016 08:49 am
@farmerman,
E-mail Dr. McKellar's office and ask. Really. He was super-keen during the interview - I suspect someone from his team would respond.

In the alternative, submit that as a question to Quirks and Quarks - it might get onto their next listener request show. They LOVE follow-up questions to their programs.

http://www.cbc.ca/radio/quirks/contact
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Dec, 2016 09:01 am
@ehBeth,
The Quirks mini-blog on this find

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/feathered-dinosaur-tail-amber-1.3885813

https://i.cbc.ca/1.3887189.1481212863!/fileImage/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/16x9_620/feathered-dinosaur.jpg
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Dec, 2016 09:35 am
@ehBeth,
llookit them dam things. Here it is, a coupla tens of millions of yers past Archeopteryx an we have those advanced fethers in "fuxx feathers"
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Dec, 2016 09:38 am
@edgarblythe,
see the evidence of teeth ? I dont like many reconstruction drawings as they often contain "wishful thinking" The fossil from Smithsonian mag , because of its post glottal feature, is pwrhaps a struthiomimidae and not the maniraptor id'd in the original article.
Struthiomimids were often called "fake birds"
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Dec, 2016 09:44 am
@farmerman,
Now - seriously - contact Quirks with your question. Maybe you'd be picked to be one of call-in questioners ... actually we'd have a better chance if Rosborne got his daughter to leave a message for Bob - they go nuts for kids asking questions on that show.
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Mon 12 Dec, 2016 09:48 am
@ehBeth,
I can imitate a really precocious 8 year old(someone who pronounces his R's like W's just for cuteness)

"AHEM

"Does we think that pewhaps the Wachis of Da Feddews in ambew awent fwom a Stwuthiomimus radder dan a Maniwapter
??
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Dec, 2016 09:54 am
@farmerman,
Do it!

my favourite Quirks show every year is the live listener question show

this was their 2014 line-up - they had a theme that year

Quote:
We asked our listeners to submit really Big Science Questions, and assembled a panel of local scientists to tackle them. So, sit back, relax, and get ready to be amazed and amused.

"What will future civilizations remember from our era?" For this question, we're joined by Dr. Heather Miller, an associate professor of anthropology at the University of Toronto, Mississauga.

"Is the universe infinite?" Joining us to answer this question is Dr. Roberto Abraham, a professor in the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Toronto.

"What would the world be like if the Earth were not tilted on its axis?" Joining us to answer this question is Dr. Sarah Finkelstein, an associate professor in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Toronto.

"When the universe burst into existence 15 billion years ago with the Big Bang, matter and antimatter existed in equal amounts. So where did all the antimatter go?" Joining us to answer this question is Dr. Scott Menary, a professor of physics at York University.

"Why does biodiversity matter?" Joining us to answer this question is Dr. Dawn Bazely, a professor of biology at York University.

"Why does every human culture - past and present - have music?" To help answer this question, we're joined by Dr. Sandra Trehub, a professor of psychology at the University of Toronto, Mississauga.

"Why don't land mammals the size of the big dinosaurs exist today?" Joining us to answer this question is Dr. David Evans, a curator of vertebrate paleontology at the Royal Ontario Museum, and assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Toronto.

"Does artificial intelligence exist?" Joining us to answer this question is Dr. Sheila McIlraith, a professor of computer science at the University of Toronto.

"Given the impacts of climate change, where in Canada will be the best place to live 100 years from now?" To help answer this question, we're joined by Dr. Barry Smit, a professor emeritus of geography at the University of Guelph.

"Why does every living thing die?" For this question, we're joined by Dr. Michelle Aarts, an assistant professor of cell and systems biology at the University of Toronto.


http://www.cbc.ca/radio/quirks/quirks-quarks-for-june-21-2014-1.2842824

I've never known a listener, but I've known a few of their experts over the years.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Dec, 2016 04:52 am
@ehBeth,
I always like "quirks and Quarks" whenever we had the radio on in the boat. I think Id be embarrassed to ask a dumass question like mine to the show. Maybe someone should ask about the impending collision between Andromeda and the Milky Way. What are we gonna call the product of their collision, galaxy wise.
ANDROMEDA WAY?
MILKYOMEDA?
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Dec, 2016 08:41 am
@farmerman,
I listened to the interview with Dr. McKellar again last night. There really is nothing like a science nerd Very Happy love 'em
0 Replies
 
 

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