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Is the benefit of reciting translated Koran the same as reciting it in Arabic?

 
 
magdo
 
Reply Wed 20 Jan, 2016 12:36 pm
the benefits of reciting translated Koran
 
McGentrix
 
  0  
Reply Wed 20 Jan, 2016 01:02 pm
@magdo,
No. I believe you can be stoned for it in some places.
0 Replies
 
coldjoint
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 20 Jan, 2016 02:14 pm
@magdo,
Quote:
the benefits of reciting translated Koran

None, unless you are recruiting supremacists and killers.

Also, the Arabic language was still being formed when the Koran was written. The fact that people consider somehow special is a well promoted myth.
0 Replies
 
fresco
 
  0  
Reply Wed 20 Jan, 2016 03:19 pm
@magdo,
يا حما
Arabic Koran much stronger word magic !
Don't put up with kufr imitations !
coldjoint
 
  0  
Reply Wed 20 Jan, 2016 03:30 pm
@fresco,
Quote:
Don't put up with kufr imitations !


What did I tell you? Islam is the original KKK.
0 Replies
 
coldjoint
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 20 Jan, 2016 11:33 pm
I think it is time to ask my favorite question that no one ever answers.

Name one thing positive about Islam for non-Muslims?
fresco
 
  2  
Reply Thu 21 Jan, 2016 01:20 am
@coldjoint,
As a religion, Islam is no different to other monotheisms in giving conditioned followers 'a reason for existence'. The particular problems of Islam stem from its fixation on the medieval culture within which it evolved which makes it antithetical to modern cultural developments, some of which such as sexual emancipation, directly conflict with one of the main social functions of religion as an authoritative sexual regulator. This conflict (technically a form of cognitive dissonance) can manifest in fanaticism with respect to chauvinistic control structures, exacerbated by the rise of the ubiquity of modern media. The resulting 'rationality' is to favor 'the next life' over this one and to take steps to hasten and welcome the transition 'to it'. The psychologically intrusive regular wailing (aka 'calls to prayer') from minerets in Islamic countries no doubt has an insidious reinforcing effect on aspirations for 'other worldliness'.

Outsiders, steeped as they are in their own cultural norms embedded in both language and thought, have difficulty communing with the medieval Islamic mindset. But at a simple biological level this can be viewed as no more than a manifestation of the tribalism we all inherit from our primate ancestors.
0 Replies
 
fresco
 
  3  
Reply Thu 21 Jan, 2016 01:54 am
@coldjoint,
I should perhaps have added that converts to Islam (and they are not uncommon) are no doubt attracted by its established rule structures which purport to give entree to 'the next life'. Compared to that, joining a monastery may seem less attractive. Wink
coldjoint
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 21 Jan, 2016 12:13 pm
@fresco,
Quote:
I should perhaps have added

You should have added an answer to my question.
0 Replies
 
McGentrix
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Jan, 2016 01:04 pm
It really should be read in the original Klingon. Far more authentic that way.
coldjoint
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 21 Jan, 2016 01:12 pm
@McGentrix,
Quote:
It really should be read in the original Klingon.

The Koran itself says it is to be interpreted literally. So in any language the results are the same. It obligates devout Muslims to advance Islam anyway they can. That includes terror, intimidation, and all the help it can get from dhimmis and apologists.
fresco
 
  4  
Reply Fri 22 Jan, 2016 01:16 am
@coldjoint,
I did answer your question, but not to your satisfaction.
The reason why Islamaphobes like you are generally on 'ignore' is that you are making exactly the same mistake the Nazi's did with the Jews by using simplistic conspiracy theories. We all know that religious belief systems can be pernicious but so can a simplistic belief in nationalism.
Wake up ! You are a just as much prisoner of your tribalism as the religious fanatics you deride.
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Jan, 2016 08:53 am
@magdo,
magdo wrote:

the benefits of reciting translated Koran


I don't think that the benefits of reciting translated Koran are the same as reciting it in Arabic.

Consider the Hebrew translation of the mourner's Kaddish. From,Anita Diamant: "Saying Kaddish":

"the sound and rhythm of this prayer are so deeply embedded in Jewish hearts and souls, some contemporary liberal Jews do read or recite the Kaddish as a private meditation and find comfort in it".

In my experience,the "sound and rhythm" of the Kaddish can only be truly experienced when this prayer is recited in Hebrew. Even if the individual reciting Kaddish doesn't know Hebrew, the mere reciting of this prayer in Hebrew ( usually out loud) can be a very emotional experience ( one that could never be evoked if Kaddish were recited in English).


fresco
 
  2  
Reply Fri 22 Jan, 2016 09:31 am
@Miller,
Unfortunately magdo ( aka hassanelagouz) is not interested in the psychological or sociological benefits of participating in general in 'original holy text' reading. The timeless/unchanging aspects of such rituals transparently reflect religious promises about an eternal 'after-life' and that is the essence of their 'benefits'. Magdo is merely interested in proselytizing for Islam alone, by asking and answering his own questions thereby adding to his store of celestial brownie points.
0 Replies
 
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Jan, 2016 04:42 pm
It should be apparent from my posts above that I am not unsympathetic to the view that Islam has its own unique problems in coming to terms with the 21st century. However, with a few notable exceptions, most atrocities, like those you cite, are basically internecene (Shia vs Sunni), a violent situation which parallels the historical strife between Protestants and Catholics (probably still simmering in Northern Ireland). The point which you fail to grasp is that many religions and nationalisms can revert to raw tribalism, which is only exacerbated by stereotyping.
During WW1, one manifestation of tribalism in England was the kicking of German dogs walking in the street. That sort of nonsense is where your selective propaganda is taking you.
coldjoint
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 22 Jan, 2016 08:07 pm
@fresco,
Quote:
I am not unsympathetic to the view that Islam has its own unique problems in coming to terms with the 21st century. However, with a few notable exceptions, most atrocities, like those you cite, are basically internecene (Shia vs Sunni), a violent situation which parallels the historical strife between Protestants and Catholics (probably still simmering in Northern Ireland). The point which you fail to grasp is that many religions and nationalisms can revert to raw tribalism, which is only exacerbated by stereotyping.


First, Muslims are coming to terms with nothing. Any legitimate reformers are on kill lists and ignored by our leaders in favor of orgs. like CAIR. And polls show overwhelming support for Sharia in Islamic countries. Plus support for stoning, killing gays, and death for apostasy.


Secondly, there is no, 0, Christian doctrine to justify or support the terror in Ireland. Unlike the Islamic teachings that apply to everyone not considered a true Muslim whether Shia or Shiite.

Third there are people in the Muslim world that only know tribalism. There is no reverting when you have never advanced. So the word stereotyping is just another word to mask the reality of the situation, and silence any discussion in your vail of alledged racism.

Finally the Koran is nothing more than the first edition of Mein Kampf.
0 Replies
 
 

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