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The Possible Affect of Politically Expedient Prosecution

 
 
giujohn
 
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 04:10 pm
If the BPD officers are convicted this will be the precedent set.

1.) Criminals may flee from a police officer without fear of pursuit.
2.)Criminals under arrest may mitigate charges by always crying that they are in need of medical attention.
3.) Officers will not investigate possible crimes in progress based on probable cause and will only act after the fact when there are witnesses willing to testifiy and/or photographic evidence., and the arrest can be effected by warrant.
4.)Officers will require an EMT at ALL arrests, before, during, and after.
5.) Crime will increase dramatically.
6.) The public will be endangered.
7.) Taxpayes will shoulder the burden.
8.) Bleeding heart liberal will have a nice warm feeeling inside (at first...until they are a victim of a violent crime).
9.) Criminals will rejoice.
10.) More riots will ensue...after all "it's just property"
11.) Shortage of police caused by drop in applicants.
12.) Military will have to police the streets.

Welcome to your new dystopian society.
 
roger
 
  4  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 05:20 pm
@giujohn,
giujohn wrote:

1.) Criminals may flee from a police officer without fear of pursuit.


You mean suspects, don't you? And, without fear of being shot down, instead of pursuit?
giujohn
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 05:31 pm
@roger,
Quote:

You mean suspects, don't you?

No, I mean criminals...like Freddie Gray:

March 20, 2015: Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance
March 13, 2015: Malicious destruction of property, second-degree assault
January 20, 2015: Fourth-degree burglary, trespassing
January 14, 2015: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance, possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute
December 31, 2014: Possession of narcotics with intent to distribute
December 14, 2014: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance
August 31, 2014: Illegal gambling, trespassing
January 25, 2014: Possession of marijuana
September 28, 2013: Distribution of narcotics, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance, second-degree assault, second-degree escape
April 13, 2012: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance, violation of probation
July 16, 2008: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance, possession with intent to distribute
March 28, 2008: Unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance
March 14, 2008: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to manufacture and distribute
February 11, 2008: Unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance, possession of a controlled dangerous substance
August 29, 2007: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute, violation of probation
August 28, 2007: Possession of marijuana
August 23, 2007: False statement to a peace officer, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance
July 16, 2007: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance (2 counts)

You see, if a police officer sees a know drug dealer in a high crime area where drugs are slod open air, and when a known offender sees police and runs, THATS PROBABLE CAUSE TO SUSPECT A CRIME. AND WHEN HE RUNS THATS FLEEING/RESISTING ARREST
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 05:42 pm
@giujohn,
giujohn wrote:

If the BPD officers are convicted


they will have been found guilty.

___________

Police training will be reviewed, if that is not already underway. **

Police in other countries are able to arrest people without killing them.


____


** at least one group of American police was recently in Toronto, discussing how to work in multicultural communities
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 05:42 pm
@giujohn,
giujohn wrote:

Quote:

You mean suspects, don't you?

No, I mean criminals...like Freddie Gray:



that is no excuse
0 Replies
 
giujohn
 
  2  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 06:03 pm
@ehBeth,
Quote:
giujohn wrote:


If the BPD officers are convicted




Quote:
they will have been found guilty.


Well no ****.
Quote:
Police training will be reviewed, if that is not already underway.


If any of these cops are convicted of an illegal arrest for chasing a known drug dealer who runs at the sight of police in an area where drugs are sold, you wont have to retrain the cops...they will just ignore it in the future...they would have to be crazy to get involved anymore...result: criminals will take over.

ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 06:16 pm
@giujohn,
giujohn wrote:
you wont have to retrain the cops...they will just ignore it in the future...


sounds like a poorly trained group

first-world countries manage to police their communities without the death rate seen in the US

_____

a little reading was useful here - some whack sites out there for sure but still

What America’s police departments don’t want you to know

Quote:

According to the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report, in 2013 there were 461 “justifiable homicides” by police — defined as “the killing of a felon by a law enforcement officer in the line of duty.” In all but three of these reported killings, officers used firearms.


The true number of fatal police shootings is surely much higher, however, because many law enforcement agencies do not report to the FBI database. Attempts by journalists to compile more complete data by collating local news reports have resulted in estimates as high as 1,000 police killings a year. There is no way to know how many victims, like Brown, were unarmed.


By contrast, there were no fatal police shootings in Great Britain last year. Not one. In Germany, there have been eight police killings over the past two years. In Canada — a country with its own frontier ethos and no great aversion to firearms — police shootings average about a dozen a year.

Liberals and conservatives alike should be outraged at the frequency with which police in this country use deadly force. There is no greater power that we entrust to the state than the license to take life. To put it mildly, misuse of this power is at odds with any notion of limited government.

I realize that the great majority of police officers never fire their weapons in the line of duty. Most cops perform capably and honorably in a stressful, dangerous job; 27 were killed in 2013, according to the FBI. Easy availability of guns means that U.S. police officers — unlike their counterparts in Britain, Japan or other countries where there is appropriate gun control — must keep in mind the possibility that almost any suspect might be packing heat.

But any way you look at it, something is wrong. Perhaps the training given officers is inadequate. Perhaps the procedures they follow are wrong. Perhaps an “us vs. them” mentality estranges some police departments from the communities they are sworn to protect.


Whatever the reason, it is hard to escape the conclusion that police in this country are much too quick to shoot. We’ve seen the heartbreaking results most recently in the fatal shooting of 28-year-old Akai Gurley, an unarmed man who was suspected of no crime, in the stairwell of a Brooklyn housing project, and the killing of 12-year-old Tamir Rice, who was waving a toy gun around a park in Cleveland.



Quote:
Burghart and others who have attempted to count and analyze police shootings shouldn’t have to do the FBI’s job. All law enforcement agencies should be required to report all uses of deadly force to the bureau, using a standardized format that allows comparisons and analysis.

Police departments that have nothing to hide should be eager to cooperate.



http://fivethirtyeight.com/datalab/another-much-higher-count-of-police-homicides/
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 06:43 pm
Canada is at about 25% of the US police homicide rate

that's still too high

http://theindependent.ca/2015/04/14/stop-the-killing-fatal-police-shootings-in-canada/

Quote:
Canadian police kill more people in one year than UK police kill in 10, despite our countries having homicide rates in the same ballpark. This seems to be the result of different approaches to policing; in particular, most police officers in the UK do not carry guns. The typical British ‘bobby’ is expected to carry out her duties armed only with speed cuffs, a baton, and tear gas or pepper spray. Firearms are restricted to special units whose members have lots of experience and special training. If police in Canada were to adopt this approach, a lot of unnecessary tragedies could be averted.

But you may ask: If UK police do not carry guns, doesn’t that place them greater risk? Apparently not. Not a single British police officer has been murdered on the job since 2012.


<snip>



The British invented modern policing in the early 19th century, establishing the ‘Peelian Principles’ of policing by consent. One of those principles is “to use only the minimum degree of physical force which is necessary on any particular occasion for achieving a police objective“. British police seem to adhere more closely to these principles than Canadian police do. Perhaps we should look at them as a model for reform.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 06:52 pm
@giujohn,

giujohn wrote:

Quote:

You mean suspects, don't you?

No, I mean criminals...like Freddie Gray:

March 20, 2015: Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance
March 13, 2015: Malicious destruction of property, second-degree assault
January 20, 2015: Fourth-degree burglary, trespassing
January 14, 2015: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance, possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute
December 31, 2014: Possession of narcotics with intent to distribute
December 14, 2014: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance
August 31, 2014: Illegal gambling, trespassing
January 25, 2014: Possession of marijuana
September 28, 2013: Distribution of narcotics, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance, second-degree assault, second-degree escape
April 13, 2012: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance, violation of probation
July 16, 2008: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance, possession with intent to distribute
March 28, 2008: Unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance
March 14, 2008: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to manufacture and distribute
February 11, 2008: Unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance, possession of a controlled dangerous substance
August 29, 2007: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute, violation of probation
August 28, 2007: Possession of marijuana
August 23, 2007: False statement to a peace officer, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance
July 16, 2007: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance (2 counts)

You see, if a police officer sees a know drug dealer in a high crime area where drugs are slod open air, and when a known offender sees police and runs, THATS PROBABLE CAUSE TO SUSPECT A CRIME. AND WHEN HE RUNS THATS FLEEING/RESISTING ARREST


He was a fugitive with an outstanding warrant is what you are saying. That does make a lot of difference. Otherwise, he has a prior history which might lead one to suspect a crime. Not quite the same thing.
giujohn
 
  0  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 07:17 pm
@ehBeth,
Number of Police officers in England:130,000
Deaths at the hands of English police 1990-present: 1500
Number of assualts on on English police last year: about 20,000, 1 every 30 minutes.

Number of police in the U.S. : Over 1 million
Number of assaults on American police: 58000...IN THE LAST 10 YEARS.
American police death rate, past 10 years: 1 every 60 hours
0 Replies
 
giujohn
 
  0  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 07:30 pm
@roger,
Quote:

He was a fugitive with an outstanding warrant is what you are saying. That does make a lot of difference. Otherwise, he has a prior history which might lead one to suspect a crime.


One more time...He is a known drug dealer in an area known for open air drug sales and when he spotted the police he ran...ergo the police officer had probable cause to suspect him of a crime and when he fled he was resisting arrest. So the prosecuter claiming an unlawful arrest is doing so for polictical expediancy...SHE DID IT TO FORSTALL ANOTHER RIOT THIS WEEKEND. The ONLY thing the cops did wrong was not follow procedure in belting him in his seat. And if he was combative, doing so in that small area would probably got a cop hurt. As for not calling the EMTs, cops arent Drs. Can you imagine if the cops had to call an EMT EVERYTIME an arrestee complained he was in pain? What utter bullshit.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 07:54 pm
@roger,
roger wrote:

He was a fugitive with an outstanding warrant is what you are saying.


do you have anything about an outstanding warrant? I've been trying to find something but nada so far.

I keep coming up against stuff like this

http://www.businessinsider.com/prosecutor-says-no-reason-to-arrest-freddie-gray-2015-5

http://www.businessinsider.com/did-police-have-a-right-to-stop-freddie-gray-2015-4
giujohn
 
  0  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 08:12 pm
@ehBeth,
Quote:
Attempts by journalists to compile more complete data by collating local news reports have resulted in estimates as high as 1,000 police killings a year
The figure of over 1000 killings is from a face book page whose creator is anonymous. The page states that there has been about 400 killings so far this year. A check of those listed on this page, 1/1/15-date is significanly less then half that number and some are traffic acccidents involving a police car.
WHAT BULLSHIT
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 08:27 pm
@giujohn,
giujohn wrote:
The ONLY thing the cops did wrong was not follow procedure in belting him in his seat.

The rule requiring a seat belt was put in place only nine days before, and the department had done little to inform officers of the new rule.
giujohn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 09:12 pm
@oralloy,
Good point my friend...I had heard that and forgot it. Thanks for bringing it up.
0 Replies
 
giujohn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 09:37 pm

The police initially stopped Gray because he "fled unprovoked upon noticing police presence," according to charging documents written by officer Garrett Miller and cited by The Baltimore Sun.

He said the incident occurred in a high-crime area, and officers suspected Gray's involvement in criminal activity.

Freddie Gray was arrested outside the Gilmore Homes housing project in the Sandtown neighborhood.


A Supreme Court case from 2000, Illinois v. Wardlow

The ruling in that case found that cops have a right to stop people for fleeing at the sight of officers as long as other suspicious factors are at play — like a high-crime area.

"Headlong flight — wherever it occurs — is the consummate act of evasion: it is not necessarily indicative of wrongdoing, but it is certainly suggestive of such," Chief Justice William Rehnquist wrote for the majority.


So it seems that the prosecuter whole case is based on what she claims is an illegal arrest. IT WAS NOT.
She then asserts the police were responsible for his death because they did not call the EMTS. It is a well established fact that offenders will routinely lie and say they are hurt so as to mitigate their charges. The police officer can not call the EMTs when there is no obvious cause to believe the person is in distress. That was done when he was found to be unresponsive.
Not belted in? The basis for a criminal charge??? BULLSHIT.
These officers were given up as a sacrifice to satisfy the likes of Al Sharpton and those who scream no justice no peace. What they really mean is if they dont get the justice they want there will be more riots and cops killed.
It's time for every police officer in this country to worry about protecting themseves from race baiters, the letftist press, and liberal politicians, and forget about protecting the public.
RABEL222
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 11:13 pm
@giujohn,
Its about time that the police were investigated by a group of citizens that were not controlled by the police that are being investigated. Too damn many police shootings that were unnecessary. If someone runs from the cops that shouldent be a shooting offense. That is being judge, jury, and executioner. And after conversing with you and the fact you claim to have been a policeman I also think they should all have a mental evaluation.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 11:55 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:
Police in other countries are able to arrest people without killing them.
I just looked it up again: here, in (all) Germany, the police used e.g. their weapons in 10,879 times, 10,789 times against animals and "other things", 100 times against persons (out of those shots, 41 were warn shots). Eight people were killed by police in 2013, six in 2014.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 11:59 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:

roger wrote:

He was a fugitive with an outstanding warrant is what you are saying.


do you have anything about an outstanding warrant? I've been trying to find something but nada so far.


Not a thing. I was trying to point out to gui they didn't even have cause to pursue. A past history of crime would not give them such cause, unless they did have such a warrant.
0 Replies
 
RABEL222
 
  0  
Reply Tue 5 May, 2015 01:53 pm
@roger,
Quote:
He was a fugitive with an outstanding warrant is what you are saying. That does make a lot of difference. O


So the cop knew this person and knew he had a warrant for his arrest and that he was a fugitive? That sounds a lot like an excuse after the fact to cover his, the cops, ass.
 

 
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