Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 10:42 am
Mr. B and I are working on a project where we are re-purposing some old doors and windows into a storage area in our basement.

We were driving by a house that is being deconstructed and noticed a big window in their debris pile so we stopped to take a look -- it turned out to be a Dutch door. The next day Mr. B went to the construction site to ask about it and they gave it to him.

Now I'm thinking I would really like to use it as a front door since it would make dog control much easier when someone comes knocking. Mr. B says he's heard they can be problematic as exterior doors because of the stress on the hinges.

Has anyone here had a Dutch door as an exterior door? How big a problem was it? Is there something special you can do to minimize the problem? Should I just give up my goal of using this door as a front door?

The door looks just like this one:

http://media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/236x/22/72/dc/2272dc414945daef4b8f87c4555064c9.jpg
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 10:49 am
@boomerang,
Interesting idea, Boomer. I'd obviously try to keep your original door frame in place.

Weatherstripping might be a bit more problematic but not an insurmountable problem.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  2  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 10:51 am
@boomerang,
You can mitigate the stresses by replacing all the short hinge screws with long ones that reach the framing members.
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 10:59 am
@JTT,
I'm glad the door was free because it sounds like the hinges and installation could be expensive!

We are eventually going to have to redo our entrance area. Maybe we need to put the door on the back burner until we get to that construction project...
Foofie
 
  2  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 11:11 am
Back in the '50's their was a family sit-com, the name I don't remember, where there was a Dutch door in the back. It allowed the woman of the house to speak to a neighbor, or someone at the back of the house. But, I never thought of a Dutch door as a front door. In my mind, I would wonder if it would be considered easier to jimmy, and would therefore attract a burglar? Plus, would a Dutch door, in the front, make for problems if one ever wanted to sell the house?
JTT
 
  3  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 11:18 am
@boomerang,
Quote:
I'm glad the door was free because it sounds like the hinges and installation could be expensive!


I don't know why that should be. Unless the door is a 2'-8" and you have a 3'-0"
frame now.

The ideal would be that the door has to be trimmed/planed a wee bit to fit: easier than adding to the door, tho' that's not impossible, specially if you're painting.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 11:20 am
@Foofie,
Good points, Foofie.

Are you thinking of Mr Ed? Smile
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  3  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 11:23 am
@boomerang,
There are hinges and great sturdy hinges, and I haven't priced them lately but I wouldn't be put off by that. Agree with JTT on the long screws/framing.

I presume there would also be good locks. That's a problem with doors with lites that are breakable - which is why I might put a lock in an odd place.
Lordyaswas
 
  3  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 11:37 am
@boomerang,
In the UK, these are called Stable Doors.

If you search that on google and then choose images, you'll probably see that most of them are exterior doors, front and back.

A deadlock on the bottom half would provide security for that bottom half whilst the top was open. If you live in a dodgy area, maybe a deadlock on both halves for when you shut up shop at night.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  2  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 12:05 pm
If you need something to fill the need until your front entrance is redone, this might solve the problem as well as it did ours.


It is a self storing storm and screen door with a plexiglass window on top. When you lower the window, it pulls a screen into place. I like it because we can also open the window to talk with solicitors without opening the door for the dogs to escape. It also gives a bit more security than a full screen door that can be easily cut open and has the feel of a dutch door with the additional benefit of a screen that doesn't have to be swapped out with the change in seasons.

http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/productImages/400/6c/6cdaff06-6c0e-4ab4-9b48-5f860c6a78f1_400.jpg


http://www.homedepot.com/p/Andersen-2500-Series-New-36-in-White-Aluminum-Self-Storing-Storm-Door-with-Nickel-Hardware-HD2SSN36WH/203207917
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 12:10 pm
@Foofie,
I've never thought much about where a Dutch door belongs but for us to have it on the front would be really practical. Our front door isn't visible from the street and our house is a Tudor-esque cottage so I think architecturally speaking, it would fit in.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 12:13 pm
@ossobuco,
The whole front of our house is doors in place of windows. If someone wanted to break in it would be super easy so I'm not really worried about it from a security standpoint.
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 12:18 pm
@Butrflynet,
That's pretty cool!
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 12:24 pm
@boomerang,
Great - I was guessing you weren't worried about that. Our old craftsman bungalow of many years was loaded with windows. But also we were on a street that had people always going by, not very likely re burglary. No problemo for 25 years there. Oh, and sometimes there was a raucous dog. Not to mention the pit bull next door, who was probably a disincentive as well, as was his owner.
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 12:30 pm
@ossobuco,
We don't have a door bell. We have a dog bell. Our dogs are big and can be very loud. Someone would have to be crazy to come in here uninvited.

Old houses weren't built with security in mind, were they? I'm not a burglar but I could break into this house in about 30 seconds.
Lordyaswas
 
  3  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 12:35 pm
Friends of ours have a Great Dane, and soon after getting him, installed a stable door between the hallway and the kitchen, as he used to just stroll in and help himself to whatever was on the worktop.

Now he just rests his head on the bottom half and looks doleful.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 12:38 pm
@Lordyaswas,
There are people who shouldn't own a dog.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 12:47 pm
@boomerang,
The "Dutch doors" are called here Klöntür, which can be translated to "chatting door".
In the Netherlands, the only "Dutch doors" are to be found at horse stables, but they are quite common here - modern ones qualify for highest insurance levels. (I've once lift in an apartment above a jewellery shop - the complete house was technically a 'tresor' ... with a Dutch door as entrance door.

This one is from a pharmacy ...

http://i1334.photobucket.com/albums/w641/Walter_Hinteler/d_zps6e301412.jpg

... the following models from catalogues of local carpenters

http://i1334.photobucket.com/albums/w641/Walter_Hinteler/a_zpsa7074bcc.jpghttp://i1334.photobucket.com/albums/w641/Walter_Hinteler/b_zpsf23bfc78.jpghttp://i1334.photobucket.com/albums/w641/Walter_Hinteler/c_zps9718fb65.jpg
chai2
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 12:54 pm
Just my 2 cents....

When we bought our house, it had a dutch door leading from the kitchen, and it was a royal pain in the ass.

It was one of the first things we replaced.
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Thu 19 Jun, 2014 12:58 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
The pediment over that white door is outrageously cool! Do you know what material that is?
0 Replies
 
 

 
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