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Survey/interview questions for Gerontology

 
 
Reply Tue 5 Nov, 2013 05:59 pm
I need responses from one person in the age group of 14–20 and one person from the age group of 45–60. Or at least close to those ages. I am writing a paper to compare and contrast the answers. Any help would be appreciated.

Do you think age is a good indicator of how old someone is? Please explain your
answer.
.
Do you think older people are more alike than younger people are? Why do you think that?
.
Would you say that, for most people, old age is a wonderful time? Please explain
your answer.
.
Respond to this statement: “If people live long enough, they will probably become
senile.” Tell me the basis for your response.
.
Do you feel young people are more productive than older people? Would you
elaborate on that?
.
Would you say that older workers are more likely than younger workers to resist
change? On what is your answer based?
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jespah
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Nov, 2013 07:47 pm
@kcudykcul,
Sure, I'll bite. I fit into your 45-60 group. I'm kind of curious as to what you define as "old age". When I was a kid, 60 was old. Right now, I'd say 90 is.

kcudykcul wrote:
I need responses from one person in the age group of 14–20 and one person from the age group of 45–60. Or at least close to those ages. I am writing a paper to compare and contrast the answers. Any help would be appreciated.

Do you think age is a good indicator of how old someone is? Please explain your answer.


Most of the time, but see above. Our definition of old has changed. Some of that has to do with our own personal aging process, but it also has to do with overall public health, and life expectancy. Plus we see more older people these days, just in general.

kcudykcul wrote:
Do you think older people are more alike than younger people are? Why do you think that?


Not a chance. "Older people" is an enormous group. If you decided, let's say, that anyone 50 and up would be considered to be a part of this group of "older people", that shoves me into the same category as, for example, Nancy Reagan. I ran a 5K the day before yesterday. I doubt she'll be running again any time soon.

kcudykcul wrote:
Would you say that, for most people, old age is a wonderful time? Please explain your answer.


Same as above; this is a painfully over-generalized statement. Healthy people tend to be happier. Big shocker there, I know. People with a modicum of wealth (e. g. enough to pay their bills) are happier, too. Get a 20 year old sick with cancer and make her $100,000 in debt and she'll be miserable. Get a 90 year old healthy with all bills paid and a decent surplus to allow for generosity and charitable giving and you're likely to get a happy person out of that. There's more to life than those two things but I don't have all night to explain this.

kcudykcul wrote:
Respond to this statement: “If people live long enough, they will probably become senile.” Tell me the basis for your response.


They will, by definition. Alzheimer's and similar afflictions rise as a percentage of the population in a pretty direct correlation to calendar age. E. g. of the 5.2 million Americans with Alzheimer's, all but 200,000 of them are over the age of 65. See: http://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_facts_and_figures.asp
That same page says 1 in 3 seniors dies of Alzheimer's or another dementia.

kcudykcul wrote:
Do you feel young people are more productive than older people? Would you elaborate on that?


Not necessarily. Concentration issues and squirrel-chasing can reduce anyone's productivity, but having grey hairs doesn't automatically confer more responsible tendencies, either.

kcudykcul wrote:
Would you say that older workers are more likely than younger workers to resist change? On what is your answer based?


Ha, nope. As I've said before, these are incredibly, mind-bogglingly generalized statements. Individuals differ, and your mileage is guaranteed to vary.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 5 Nov, 2013 09:05 pm
@kcudykcul,
Incidentally, if you're looking at the 45-60 age group, know that it's not a group that most would consider as a elderly or gerontology group. However, aged 60 (and up) would be.
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