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Michele Obama & Racial Segregation At Princeton University/ U of Alabama in 2013 Sororities

 
 
Miller
 
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2013 08:00 pm
The recent 2013 investigations into alleged discrimination against Afro-American women by sororities at the University of Alabama brings to mind the racial discrimination experiences of Michele Obama as an undergraduate at Princeton University.

Michelle Obama's College Roommate Wanted All-White Dorm
by dawnt .
There has been much ado about Michelle Obama's college thesis in which she described feeling like an outsider at Princeton -- a black person first, a student second. I understand how she could have felt that way, especially twenty five years ago. After reading a poignant article about Michelle Obama's first college roommate, I have new insight into the environment that made her feel like a second class student during her college years.

More after the fold...
.
When Michelle Obama's roommate, born and raised in the South, arrived at Princeton, she was shocked to find herself assigned to share a dorm with a black student. So shocked, in fact, that she called her mother to help her implore the school to move her into another dorm.

The girl's mother was also shocked and angry. She called the grandmother who suggested the situation was serious enough to warrant pulling the girl out of Princeton altogether.

This was a girl raised by a struggling single mother and against all odds was able to attend Princeton, and her own family felt that she should forgo an ivy league education rather than be subjected to rooming with a black student. I cannot fathom this level of prejudice, but this the account told by the roommate and her family.

When told about the dorm assignment, her mother "stormed down to the campus housing office and demanding Donnelly be moved":

I was horrified...

I told them we weren't used to living with black people — Catherine is from the South. They probably thought I was crazy.

Growing up, Michelle Obama's roommate was taught not just that blacks were inferior but also that they should be feared:

Her mother and grandmother filled her head with racist stereotypes, portraying African-Americans as prone to crime, uneducated and, at times, people to be feared.

[Her mother], 71, explains that she was raised to think that way. She recalls hearing her grandfather, a sheriff in the North Carolina mountains, brag about running black visitors out of the county before nightfall. And Brown's parents held on to the n-word like a family heirloom.

As I read the story, I came to a paragraph that talked about the mother's feelings today. She says that now she believes it is fine for blacks and whites to room together. She has grown and shed her prejudice, and it makes me smile. Then I read further and feel like I've been kicked in the gut:

Where I draw the line is interracial marriage. That I can't quite deal with.

She goes on to describe her feelings towards blacks today, saying:

African-Americans don't take enough responsibility. Bill Cosby says the same thing. Get off your rear end and work hard and improve yourself.

I cannot imagine what that must have been like, what it must be like for black Americans. Sure, I sympathize, I have the picture in my mind, but that feeling deep down -- I'm not sure that I can really know what that's like without walking in those shoes. It pains me deep in my soul just to know it, to think about it.

The roommate goes on to describe a quasi-segregation at Princeton in those days:

Donnelly was surprised to find something familiar – segregation – alive and well on a prestigious campus in the Northeast. The university's private eating clubs, host to frat-style parties, were largely white. The social scene for many minority students, including Obama, revolved around an activity building called the Third World Center.

What struck me about the article was the gradations by which each generation's view of blacks changed. The grandmother held onto the most prejudices. The mother says that blacks are "resentful" but says she understands why they are. The daughter, Michelle Obama's roommate says that she laments missed opportunities to make black friends.

Ironically, during the same semester that this white roommate was trying to get rid of her black roommate, she was also coming out as a lesbian and learning what it was like to be discriminated against based on who you are.

But it was the mother who spoke of the the ultimate irony of what happened so many years ago:

We thought this is so ironic. [Obama] could be the first lady, and here we wanted to get my child out of her influence.

Obama's roommate says that Obama likely never knew about the "behind the scenes maneuvering." Yeah right. Does she seriously think that you can live with another person 24/7 and not know that they are prejudiced against you? Does she think Michelle Obama could not see it in her eyes?

By the second semester, Michelle Obama's roommate was able to move to another room.
.
Originally posted to dawnt on Tue Apr 15, 2008 at 06:55 AM PDT
 
Miller
 
  0  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2013 08:02 pm
@Miller,
Source: dailykos.com
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2013 08:14 pm
@Miller,
Twenty-five years ago was 1988 and that seems damn late for that amount of racism to exist.

Let alone 2013.
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2013 08:15 pm
@BillRM,
It truly does.
hawkeye10
 
  -4  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2013 08:23 pm
@BillRM,
in 1977 they started bussing in blacks from the other side of town to my high school, up till then we had well over 2000 students and not more than a dozen blacks. the move did not go over well, but race was only part of the reason.....up till then we had only token poor people too (outside of some of the farm kids..ie hard working families who would never stoop to taking welfare). the wealthy rapidly abandoned the school system after that. those last couple of years there I saw a lot of black people but I doubt I ever talked to one, and most if them were in the stupid track so I did not have them in my classes. they staked out there own corner of the cafeteria, there was no mixing but in the lunch line.I get the quote.
Miller
 
  0  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2013 08:32 pm
@Miller,
Jesse Jackson speaks on segregation in University of Alabama greek system, suggests picketing sorority houses

By Stephen Dethrage
on September 14, 2013 at 10:20 PM, updated September 15, 2013 at 12:52 PM

TUSCALOOSA, Alabama –The Rev. Jesse Jackson Saturday compared the public outrage following accusations of racism in some University of Alabama sororities to the civil rights movement that swept through the state and nation 50 years ago.

Speaking mostly to members of the university’s student newspaper, the Crimson White, Jackson addressed allegations of advisers and alumnae in some sororities blocking black women from being recruited because of theirrace.

The CW broke the story of the alleged segregation Wednesday and has since drawn nationwide attention to Tuscaloosa as national media outlets including CNN and the New York Times report on the issue.

"Gender or racial segregation is abhorrent to an intelligent, civilized people," Jackson said. "You might take a sorority and start picketing there."

Jackson said that kind of sustained effort could keep the issue at the center of the public attention and help push toward change. It might convince a sorority member who disagreed with the racial make-up of her sisters to leave her chapter, he said, and it might draw more protesters and picketers until the cause of Greek desegregation became too big to ignore.

He used the university's football team, the No. 1 ranked Crimson Tide, to point out the absurdity of systemic segregation. Head Coach Nick Saban, Jackson said, would never limit his recruiting capabilities to only white players. It would hinder his ability to have the most talented team possible.

In the same way, Jackson said, sororities that are traditionally white-only hurt themselves by prohibiting qualified women from joining their ranks. It also keeps their members from cultural exposure in a richly diverse world.

"When they leave here, they're not going into an all-white world," Jackson said.

Jackson said the issue was only one part of a war being waged to shape Alabama's identity, as progressive minds work to overcome the state's shortcomings past and present. He said the state would have to decide which way they would be looking as they move into the future—in the rear-view mirror at Alabama's racially charged past or through the windshield at inclusivity and progressive thought.

In the end, Jackson said, either a tradition that he called abhorrent will prevail or progress will. Jackson said it fell to the young generation to change the status quo in the same way that Jackson's generation, the generation of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Birmingham's Fred Shuttlesworth, fought for change 50 years ago.

"What's at stake here is your future, not the traditions of their past," Jackson said.
blog.al.com/tuscaloosa
















































BillRM
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2013 08:46 pm
@Miller,
Both Jackson and Sharpton are race baiters so with them getting involved it is a bad sign as far as getting to the truth of the matter is concern.
hawkeye10
 
  -4  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2013 09:20 pm
@BillRM,
the japanese are incredibly racist yet most judge them both intelligent and civilized

BillRM
 
  -3  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2013 09:37 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
the japanese are incredibly racist yet most judge them both intelligent and civilized


The Chinese, the Vietnamese and other such people that was overrun from the 1920s to the 1940s by them might to this day disagree with you.

People have long memories about the rape of Nanking and the forcing of local women into comfort women for the Japanese army by the tens of thousands

Or Japanese soldiers enjoying a contest to see how many people can be beheaded with one sword for that matter.

Quote:
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/59/Contest_To_Cut_Down_100_People.jpg/220px-Contest_To_Cut_Down_100_People.jpg

An article on the "Contest to kill 100 people using a sword" published in the Tokyo Nichi Nichi Shimbun. The headline reads, "'Incredible Record' (in the Contest to Cut Down 100 People) —Mukai 106 – 105 Noda—Both 2nd Lieutenants Go Into Extra Innings".[14]
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Sep, 2013 10:31 am
If I understood this article correctly, Michelle Obama did not really react to the situation. So, rather than lamenting about the less progressive attitudes that some people have about race, I think it is more important to applaud that the recipients of racist "attitudes" can be inured to the situation. No one is going to erase all racist attitudes.

Actually, I would guess that somewhere today there is a female roommate that is trying to have one's room changed, since the roommate is a lesbian. In other words, the willingness to say that another does not meet one's standards, to be one's roommate, need not be based on race.

Interestingly, we do not apply these ethics to birds, since we all know that birds of a feather, flock together.
Foofie
 
  0  
Reply Thu 19 Sep, 2013 12:43 pm
hawkeye10 wrote:

sure, roomate might party too late for me or be a slob, but ya if my roomate is a fag expecting me to facilitate his sex life that might so be a deal breaker for me. I am of the school that we have the right to decide the environment in our own homes regardless of how others live in their own homes, and while I cant dictate how my roomate lives I have the freedom to choose too not live with someone for any reason under the sun.


I tend to agree with you, since if a person is of another race, and one says that one would like to change rooms, few might believe that the room change is motivated by anything other than race. It could be just that the person, of another race, likes to clean his/her toes, while one is having a snack. People today are just too sensitive, in my opinion. And, the liberal culture promulgates a kindergarten type sensitivity, where everyone must be liked, in my opinion. Personally, I believe that degree of sensitivity might be caused by many people feeling that they deserve to be liked, regardless of any offensiveness. We're all so special (read: sarcasm).
hawkeye10
 
  -3  
Reply Thu 19 Sep, 2013 01:20 pm
@Foofie,
I look at it more from a personal freedom angle, the constitutional guarantee of freedom of association includes the freedom to NOT BE around who we choose not to be around, for any reason. I dont have the right to tell you where to go but I most certainly have the right to remove myself from your presence. when the supremes outlawed male only clubs they violated my rights. what we have now is police state enforced demands that we " accept" all genetic groups, the state saying that their political goal of mixing groups trumps my freedom to choose who to be around, which is a. violation of my rights
joefromchicago
 
  6  
Reply Thu 19 Sep, 2013 02:34 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:
those last couple of years there I saw a lot of black people but I doubt I ever talked to one, and most if them were in the stupid track so I did not have them in my classes.

You mean there was a track below the stupid track?
hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 19 Sep, 2013 02:59 pm
@joefromchicago,
did you earn a law degree with such shoddy class participation?
BillRM
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 19 Sep, 2013 03:21 pm
@BillRM,
My two poster here seems to approved of large scale rapes and murders done by the Japanese army in the 1920s to 1945 and the forcing of tens of thousands of women to sexually serviced the solders by voting down my post concerning the matter!!!!!!!

Amazing............
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 19 Sep, 2013 06:53 pm
@BillRM,
your comment is too far afield the topic for me to care. I do care who thinks that they get to decide for me what kind of people I like and who I associate with.
BillRM
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 19 Sep, 2013 07:25 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
your comment is too far afield the topic for me to care.


You was the one who brought up the subject of the Japanese people both being racist and yet held in high regard my friend.

They are not love in Asia to this very day due to how they treated any non-Japaneses as less then human.
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 19 Sep, 2013 10:23 pm
@BillRM,
judging people by genetics and killing/raping/ torturing people based upon race is not the same.
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Sep, 2013 10:35 am
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

the japanese are incredibly racist yet most judge them both intelligent and civilized


How does this relate to the situation at the University of Alabama?
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  0  
Reply Fri 20 Sep, 2013 10:38 am
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:

... Michelle Obama did not really react to the situation.....


Each and every Afro-American in the US does react to the act of discrimination. Whether you see it or not, it's there. Can you visualize an increase in heart rate? Can you "see" in increase in blood pressure?

etc...etc
 

 
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