10
   

Inverse relation between profanity and intelligence

 
 
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Apr, 2013 10:05 am
@izzythepush,
It is idiotic actually.

If it is okay to make the sound "cuff" in public...why on earth would it be considered wrong in any way to make the sound in reverse.

The notion of "bad words" is a greater vulgarity than any of the words.

That, plus the fact that I've got a potty mouth!
0 Replies
 
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Apr, 2013 10:05 am
@Lustig Andrei,
What the **** what????
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Apr, 2013 10:28 am
@Frank Apisa,
Words are not what is obscene - actions are.
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 19 Apr, 2013 11:37 am
@Ragman,
Quote:
Words are not what is obscene - actions are.


When it comes to the US both are mighty obscene, Ragman.

Quote:
Documentary puts U.S. embargo on Cuba in the spotlight
By LAUREN SCRUDATO

New Jersey Herald

[email protected]

NEWTON — Joe Guerriero tells the story of a journalist who could not acquire batteries to recharge her electric wheelchair while in Cuba because of the United States’ embargo against the country, which has been in place since 1960. The woman, a journalist/psychotherapist, had to resort to getting pushed by her husband or wheel herself to get around. This small act of inconvenience is among the many others Guerriero encountered while filming his first feature documentary regarding the embargo, entitled “Curtain of Water.” The premier of the movie is Thursday at Sussex County Community College. The nation’s ongoing embargo against Cuba 53 years after the Cuban revolution inspired Guerriero, an adjunct professor at SCCC, to produce a documentary addressing the opposing views on the topic. Guerriero, who also directed the film, has made 11 trips to Cuba over the last 14 years and has witnessed the impact of the embargo firsthand. According to Guerriero, “Curtain of Water,” or “Telõn de Aqua,” is timely because the public consciousness about the topic is rising. Last week, Cuban President Raul Castro assumed the presidency of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States in a demonstration of regional unity against U.S. efforts to isolate the communist government through the 50-year-old economic embargo, according to the Associated Press. Newly-sworn-in Secretary of State John Kerry has shown some openness to relaxing the tough U.S. stance on Cuba and Defense Secretary hopeful Chuck Hagel has called the U.S. embargo against the communist-run island “nonsensical” and anachronistic, the Associated Press also reported. The United States sanctioned the embargo, the prohibition of trade and business, against Cuba in 1960. “I was surprised by how many of my students didn’t even know what the embargo is,” Guerriero said. Guerriero, an adjunct professor at SCCC for the last seven years and a photographer for three decades, became interested in Cuban culture in 1999 during a photography workshop that focused on telling stories through photographs and documentaries. Through the workshop, Guerriero worked on a project regarding Chinatown Havana. David Alan Harvey, a photographer for National Geographic, initiated the first permitted educational photography workshop in Cuba in 1999, which Guerriero attended. The trip led to 11 more solo visits with a production license in hand to Cuba from 1999 until 2013 and included other various small projects. One dealt with the Santeria religion, which resulted in a book entitled “Babalawo: Father of Mysteries.” Guerriero’s trips to Cuba allowed him to witness the impact of the embargo firsthand. Over the course of two and a half years Guerriero interviewed 21 individuals from both Cuba and the United States, 15 of whom are featured in the film. When Guerriero first developed the idea for his film, he wanted it to demonstrate an activist’s point of view (he opposes the embargo), but upon further thought, he decided to keep the film balanced and investigate both sides. “I want people to watch it and decide for themselves,” Guerriero said. Guerriero focused on getting the perspective of local residents such as farmers, jewelers and carpenters who are both pro and anti-embargo. Another pro embargo source was Bicence Echerry, a well-known Cuban writer. He also spoke with officials and organizations in the U.S. such as Sandra Levinson, the director at the Center for Cuban Studies as well as members of Pastors for Peace. According to Guerriero, Pastors for Peace is a group of volunteers who collect donations around the country and have sent medical and educational supplies to Cuba every year since 1992. Their cause is illegal because they break the embargo terms, he said. Editing the film was a challenge for him. He found it difficult to maintain his focus because he had a wealth of multimedia that told stimulating stories of the daily lives of average Cubans. Guerriero’s wife, Diana, who is a teacher in Newton, aided Guerriero in his project by being the “fuel in my engine,” according to Guerriero. He described times when he wanted to call it quits but she pulled him back and made sure he continued to pursue his goal. Guerriero also credits his brother-in-law for focusing his vision as well as editor Drew Oberholtzer, who has worked for National Geographic and HBO, for polishing the rough cut. Guerriero said the main obstacles while producing his film were caused by the laws regarding the embargo. During one of his trips to Cuba, his camera was stolen right off the back of his chair in a cafe and he had no way to legally purchase another one because of embargo restrictions. He also had trouble getting Cuban locals to speak with him about anything related to politics. Guerriero funded the documentary through a Kickstarter campaign where he raised $9,000 that all went toward production costs and post-film editing. He said he does not anticipate making any money off his documentary, but, if he did, he would make a donation to the Center for Cuban Studies in New York City. Guerriero’s students at SCCC will be attending the premiere on Thursday and, he said, they are now very interested in the topic. The premiere is open to the public. “They (Cubans) have become stronger because of the embargo and have learned to deal with it,” Guerriero said. “But they wish it would go away.” Guerriero will be traveling back to Cuba this May to conduct a 10-day general photography workshop. Information about the trip can be found at joeg.com.

If you want to go

First screenings of “Curtain of Water,” or “Telõn de Aqua,” are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7, at Sussex County Community College’s Performing Arts Center. It also will include a photo exhibit of Joe Guerriero’s work during his trips to Cuba. Feb. 17: Film-release party at Anthology Film Archives in Manhattan.



http://cubandemocracy.wordpress.com/2013/02/05/documentary-puts-u-s-embargo-on-cuba-in-the-spotlight/


0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Apr, 2013 02:02 pm
@izzythepush,
You also take away the right to "**** the neighbor's wife".
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Apr, 2013 03:09 pm
@Frank Apisa,
Frank Apisa wrote:

What the **** what????


This whole fuckin' bag of ****.
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Apr, 2013 03:15 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Quote:
Quote:
Re: Frank Apisa (Post 5307282)
Frank Apisa wrote:

What the **** what????


This whole fuckin' bag of ****.


Oh!
0 Replies
 
neologist
 
  2  
Reply Mon 22 Apr, 2013 06:13 pm
I ain't gonna preach to ya. I could care less about words and their sounds when pronounced backwards - upside down, even. And I am well aware that profanity is defined largely by the nuances of history. Years ago, Frank and I may have chanced a stroll along Gropecunt Lane to dally amongst its denizens (or not). If you read the King James version of the Bible, you will find Rabshakah taunting the Jews with the idea they would soon eat their own **** and wash it down with their own piss. (A proposition no doubt more frightening than disgusting to those faced with an army of nearly 200,000.)

In the end, words are merely words. What I have taken exception to, and I think many will agree, is the use of words, particularly profanity, but also other highly charged expression as personal attacks or as a substitute for logical rhetoric.
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 02:53 am
@neologist,
neologist wrote:

Years ago, Frank and I may have chanced a stroll along Gropecunt Lane to dally amongst its denizens (or not). In the end, words are merely words. What I have taken exception to, and I think many will agree, is the use of words, particularly profanity, but also other highly charged expression as personal attacks or as a substitute for logical rhetoric.


I'd like to think we could still do this, Neo. We are two humans with different perspectives...but if we were to meet, a stroll and some chit chat would be in order. All that would certainly be very, very welcome by me...and I would hope, by you.

(Did you make up "Gropecunt Lane?")
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 09:28 am
@Frank Apisa,
Frank Apisa wrote:
neologist wrote:
Years ago, Frank and I may have chanced a stroll along Gropecunt Lane to dally amongst its denizens (or not). In the end, words are merely words. What I have taken exception to, and I think many will agree, is the use of words, particularly profanity, but also other highly charged expression as personal attacks or as a substitute for logical rhetoric.

I'd like to think we could still do this, Neo. We are two humans with different perspectives...but if we were to meet, a stroll and some chit chat would be in order. All that would certainly be very, very welcome by me...and I would hope, by you.

(Did you make up "Gropecunt Lane?")
Nope. Such a street did exist in merry olde England.
Frank Apisa
  Selected Answer
 
  3  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 10:38 am
@neologist,
Quote:
Nope. Such a street did exist in merry olde England.


Wow!

Reminds me of an old supervisor of mine, Solomon Kuntz, in a company where the management was always addressed as Mister...

Used to be lots of fun.

0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 11:08 am
@neologist,
neologist wrote:

Frank Apisa wrote:
(Did you make up "Gropecunt Lane?")
Nope. Such a street did exist in merry olde England.


A lot more than one, it was the name of the medieval redlight district in a lot of cities. Now a few of them are still called Grape Lane.
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 01:30 pm
@izzythepush,
Amazing what one can Google these days
ossobuco
 
  0  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 01:39 pm
@izzythepush,
I always liked Lenny Bruce, the man, and Lenny Bruce, the abuzzer or was it a2ker.
But I haven't read some of his quotes in years.. I'll have to remedy that.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 01:46 pm
@neologist,
Or you could live in England.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 01:52 pm
@neologist,
It's true that resorting to such exclamations can be taken as a lack of ability to word arguments well, but I don't agree with that much of the time. I take most swearing as related to letting out bubbles of frustration because one can. And once in a while swear words are really the only right answer to something.

I was raised in a relatively strict environment. I didn't know what **** meant (and I asked at least two friends) until I was eighteen or nineteen. I remember something called RF when I first went to university; I asked another premed type and he told me straightforwardly that it meant rat function. Liar, I learned later it meant rat ****. I was invited to and went to his wedding, at - of all places, in my point of view, Forest Lawn Cemetary. Not ghoulish, it was a wedding venue, but weird to me then.

Not all that long later I worked in laboratories, later sixties and seventies. All manner of higher ups swore blue streaks from time to time. It was an era of new freedoms of many kinds. Blasphemy was also prevalent, even though plenty of people subscribed to religion. That probably made it more fun for them.

Myself, I was usually on the temperate side of word usage, but the baddies would fly when I was around my cousin, who eschewed words like that as vulgar. They would just come out of my lips on their own, I guess to get her goat - but not on purpose. My brain did it.
neologist
 
  2  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 01:55 pm
@ossobuco,
ossobuco wrote:
. . . but not on purpose. My brain did it.
Hey! That's my excuse, too! Laughing
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  2  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 02:51 pm
@neologist,
Quote:
I ain't gonna preach to ya. I could care less about words and their sounds when pronounced backwards - upside down, even.


You just have, Neo, in a very eloquent fashion.

neologist
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 03:28 pm
@JTT,
Smarty pants! Razz
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 03:30 pm
@izzythepush,
I'll have to admit I didn't know about the grapes
0 Replies
 
 

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