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Know any more good contronyms

 
 
Reply Tue 19 Mar, 2013 02:24 pm
A term that has two opposite meanings or nearly so

http://www.dailywritingtips.com/75-contronyms-words-with-contradictory-meanings/

For instance "seed" means either to sew 'em or remove 'em. I've often wondered whether your friendly local distributor of "seeded" grapes isn't hoping the potential misunderstanding might get him a slight boost in sales
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Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 2,140 • Replies: 32

 
boomerang
 
  3  
Reply Tue 19 Mar, 2013 06:23 pm
@dalehileman,
A handicap in golf gives you and advantage.

Apology can be an admission of fault or a defense of thought.

Cleave can mean to split apart or to join together.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Mar, 2013 08:08 pm
@dalehileman,
How about 'moot', Dale? And it ain't even in the list. Smile
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Mar, 2013 09:49 am
@JTT,
Thanks guys. Yes I'm sure the list is hardly replete
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Wed 20 Mar, 2013 11:52 am
Quite can either mean barely or very.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Mar, 2013 11:57 am
@contrex,
I wonder why the prescriptivists haven't been all over these. Any ideas, C?
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Mar, 2013 11:58 am
@boomerang,
Quote:
Cleave can mean to split apart or to join together.
Esp good one Boom. It's not everyday……….
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Mar, 2013 12:00 pm
@JTT,
Quote:
How about 'moot'
Another goodn' JTT
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Mar, 2013 12:06 pm
@contrex,
Quote:
Quite can either mean barely or very.
Okay, though I'd disagree with "barely" there is that notable diff, like "somewhat" or "notably"
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Mar, 2013 12:07 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

I wonder why the prescriptivists haven't been all over these. Any ideas, C?


Because they are cowards?
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Mar, 2013 12:12 pm
@JTT,
Quote:
the prescriptivists
Wow JTT, for the sake of your Average Clod (me) you'll have to elaborate

Is it the contronymic who's pescriptivistic
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Mar, 2013 12:21 pm
Maltara in The Economist is good on this:

"The subtleties of corporate English"

Quote:
Stakeholder is one that gets bandied around a lot at my office. Usually it seems to mean anyone who can derail the project, but it's never clear who is a stakeholder and who isn't, although I reckon a stakeholder always adds more work than he contributes. I was amused to find that Wiktionary rates it as a contronym now, since its original meaning was someone who held the stakes of a bet (in escrow) and so in a sense held no interest or control over the outcome - the opposite of what it means now.

I am generally a descriptivist, but when a word has two opposite meanings, I stop using it. The ultimate example is factoid: when coined, it meant something that seems plausible but is not a fact (the suffix -oid denoting looks like but isn't, as in asteroid or android for star-like rock or man-like machine respectively) but nowadays it generally means 'little fact'. So when someone says 'that's a neat little factoid' the statement is utterly ambiguous, though at least the speaker has all their bases covered.


https://www.economist.com/user/1733564/comments

JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Mar, 2013 12:36 pm
@contrex,
Quote:
Because they are cowards?


They certainly are that.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Mar, 2013 12:38 pm
@contrex,
Wow thanks Con, you're really into this stuff

I'm still wondering however why we should be under attack buy the prescriptivist moreso than de-
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Mar, 2013 12:40 pm
@dalehileman,
Quote:
Is it the contronymic who's pescriptivistic?


You'll have to make your question clearer, Dale.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Mar, 2013 02:56 pm
@JTT,
Quote:
question clearer, Dale.
Sorry JTT, being facetious. See my #…..013 above; why the contronymic shouldn't descriptivistic

See #……..987 by Con above
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Mar, 2013 03:00 pm
@dalehileman,
Do you mean this, Dale?

Quote:
I am generally a descriptivist, but when a word has two opposite meanings, I stop using it.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Mar, 2013 03:19 pm
@JTT,
Quote:
Do you mean this, Dale?


Quote:
Quote:
I am generally a descriptivist, but when a word has two opposite meanings, I stop using it.
yes, in apparent answer to your

Quote:
I wonder why the prescriptivists haven't been all over these. Any ideas, C?


Just wondering how the de- or pre- apply to the con. Not critical issue
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Mar, 2013 03:28 pm
@dalehileman,
Quote:
Just wondering how the de- or pre- apply to the con.


Sorry, Dale, but I'm still not following you.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Mar, 2013 03:34 pm
@JTT,
Sorry JTT, and forgive me for not first Googling the subject but I was wondering why you're wondering

Quote:
Quote:
I wonder why the prescriptivists haven't been all over these.


In other words why a prescriptivist should object to contronyms
 

 
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