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natural rights and the market system

 
 
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 09:14 pm
I was studying the works of John Locke, the Free Market system, and the inner mechanics that enables the economy we have today. There are many examples like habeas corpus that are mentioned in the news, and this certainly extends to constitutional rights ie gun laws (to be current). What are your thoughts?
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 1,605 • Replies: 6
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JLNobody
 
  2  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 10:30 pm
@jwjohnwong1,
I don't accept notions of "natural (read: absolute) rights"; all rights are man-made attempts to develop (read: construct) civilizations on the basis of our historically developed values and social systems that work both for human suvival and growth.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2013 11:54 pm
@jwjohnwong1,
jwjohnwong1 wrote:
I was studying the works of John Locke, the Free Market system, and the inner mechanics that enables the economy we have today. There are many examples like habeas corpus that are mentioned in the news, and this certainly extends to constitutional rights ie gun laws (to be current). What are your thoughts?
The Founders of the Constitution were very LIBERTY-ORIENTED
and thay were very fond of the free-market system contemplated by John Locke.
Thay knew that personal freedom
and the jurisdiction of government r INVERSELY proportional;
i.e., a good government is one of weak & feeble jurisdiction!





David
Razzleg
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Feb, 2013 12:24 am
@JLNobody,
JLNobody wrote:

I don't accept notions of "natural (read: absolute) rights"; all rights are man-made attempts to develop (read: construct) civilizations on the basis of our historically developed values and social systems that work both for human survival and growth.


Locke would not disagree with you. His term "natural" was not intended to contrast with "man-made", but with "divine". The verbiage is a matter of historical context, not dictionary definitions. i.e., In Locke's view: "Rights" are "natural" given a common, humane recognition of similarity, and a similarity of our desires (a similarity deep enough to call mutual) -- thus cooperation is preferable to combat. Locke used the term "social contract" back in 1689 -- by "natural right" he did not mean anti-historical, "absolute" right. He meant the opposite: agreements set on a natural balance.

jwjohnwong1 wrote:

I was studying the works of John Locke, the Free Market system, and the inner mechanics that enables the economy we have today. There are many examples like habeas corpus that are mentioned in the news, and this certainly extends to constitutional rights ie gun laws (to be current). What are your thoughts?


I find your "question" confusing --what is it exactly? You throw out a name, some vague terms, some legal statutes, and suggest that there may be a connection. Do you think there is a connection? What you have provided thus far cannot elicit a rational answer?

PS: habeas corpus has nothing to do with the free market or gun control. It has to do with trial law.
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Razzleg
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Feb, 2013 02:51 am
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:

jwjohnwong1 wrote:
I was studying the works of John Locke, the Free Market system, and the inner mechanics that enables the economy we have today. There are many examples like habeas corpus that are mentioned in the news, and this certainly extends to constitutional rights ie gun laws (to be current). What are your thoughts?
The Founders of the Constitution were very LIBERTY-ORIENTED
and thay were very fond of the free-market system contemplated by John Locke.
Thay knew that personal freedom
and the jurisdiction of government r INVERSELY proportional;

i.e., a good government is one of weak & feeble jurisdiction!

David


When you say "John Locke" i think you mean "Adam Smith", or maybe -- on the outside -- you might mean "John Stuart Mill". Early liberalism, the original movement that started the ball rolling on laissez-faire economics (without recourse to John Locke's work, and, in fact, in contrast to most of it,) knew that such was only possible in a governmentally regulated economic environment.

Amongst our American fore-fathers there were some who were federalists and some that were anti-federalists... the federalists won, at least in so far as the Constitution is only enforce-able in the wake of a strong federal (v. multiple state) gov.

You are welcome to your view of things, but your history is weak.
Razzleg
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Feb, 2013 02:59 am
@Razzleg,
Man, i've thought it for a long time, but it has been sorely evidenced in this thread: some history of philosophy classes are sorely needed around here. i mean, even a quick wiki-read-and-report would be better than the confident, ignorant rants constantly made available in this so-called Φ forum.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Feb, 2013 03:02 am
@Razzleg,
Even though I seldom look into the philosophy threads, I can recognize that.
0 Replies
 
 

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