25
   

Poutine Survey: Who here has eaten it? Who here loves it?

 
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Aug, 2012 03:47 pm
@sozobe,
they don't refer to it as curds - gives a bad picture - even poutine - sounds too much like poo - I don't eat stuff called pou
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  4  
Reply Mon 13 Aug, 2012 05:01 pm
I shall never forget my first poutine -- off a push-cart vendor's push-cart in the Old City of Montreal. In December. Sidewalks hard as iron with black ice. Some snow on the ground here and there. The Cathedral of Notre Dame just down the street. Heaven. Heaven incarnate. Anyone has a bad word to say about poutine, just remember I still have my old .44 magnum in storage on the mainland. Can have it delivered any time and then suit up for travel.
George
 
  5  
Reply Mon 13 Aug, 2012 05:58 pm
Most people think that French Canadians invented poutine. Not so. The
British invented it in the eighteenth century and distributed it free to the
French Canadians. The Brits reckoned it was easier than expulsion.
Lustig Andrei
 
  4  
Reply Mon 13 Aug, 2012 06:48 pm
@George,
I'll let that slide, Geroge. You'd prob'ly put a maledictum on me if I tried to come after you.
George
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Aug, 2012 06:59 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Vere
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Tue 14 Aug, 2012 12:29 am
Poutine was only invented a little over 50 years ago, by sme diner-owner in Sherbrooke, Québec. While i'm sure they get the occasional tourist there, it's hardly a tourist mecca. I suspect the guy came up with it because he thought it would be a good idea. Fifty years later, there are millions of people who agree with him. Personally, i don't go in for the fancy-shmancy versions that silly chefs who can't leave well enough alone come up with. Just give me fresh, hot fries with cheese curds and brown gravy. I'll be happy.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Aug, 2012 06:33 am
@George,
well that explains it - the French are known for good recipes - the British ... not so much.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  2  
Reply Tue 14 Aug, 2012 06:42 am
@Lustig Andrei,
I sneer at your seelly 44 magnum.

Sounds like an elderly ice-cream.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Aug, 2012 10:34 am
@sozobe,
sozobe wrote:
Fresh, squeaky cheese curds are fantastic.


this is the key - the curds shouldn't be more than 24 hours old - they lose their squeak after that

it's kind of like mozzarella - the best is same-day fresh

0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Tue 14 Aug, 2012 10:36 am
@George,
just for my friend George

http://www.backpackfoodie.com/2009/08/22/a-brief-history-of-poutine/

Quote:
Then there’s the Chinese poutine.

Mike had humored us when we asked for poutine, but by the look on his face, my friend Hugues was now pushing his luck. Hugues was describing poutine chinoise, or Chinese poutine.

“You put the cheese on the fries. On the left side, you pour regular gravy, on the right, spaghetti sauce.”

“So poutine chinoise is half Québec poutine, half Italian,” Mike asked, skeptical.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Aug, 2012 10:50 am
@ehBeth,
I'd be quite happy to chow on poutine chinoise. I quite enjoy Italian tomato sauce on fries. Very Happy
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Aug, 2012 11:15 am
@tsarstepan,
I bet you could get some nice fresh curds at Union Square - make your own fresh poutine.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  3  
Reply Tue 14 Aug, 2012 11:31 am
Every time I go to Canada I indulge. I'd love to get it from a food cart but usually have to settle for a chain restaurant in a mall food court.
I know it's bad for you. Maybe that's why it's so tasty.
Setanta
 
  3  
Reply Tue 14 Aug, 2012 11:42 am
@panzade,
Burger King has pretty good poutine . . . Harvey's, which is the Canadian burger chain, also has good poutine. Poutine is one of the holy of holies in fast food. It should be hot, greasy and bad for you. Otherwise, it wouldn't be worth eating.
0 Replies
 
George
 
  4  
Reply Tue 14 Aug, 2012 02:28 pm
I had poutine in Saint-Gabriel-de-Valcartier in 1998.
As soon as I finish digesting it, I'm going to have some more.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Aug, 2012 03:01 pm
@panzade,
Apparently there's some good stuff out on the wet coast. Poutine too.
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Tue 14 Aug, 2012 03:22 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:

Apparently there's some good stuff out on the wet coast. Poutine too.


Which coast is the wettest, Beth? Atlantic or Pacific? Smile
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Aug, 2012 03:24 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Pacific of course! Doesn't everyone know that?
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Aug, 2012 03:26 pm
@ehBeth,
I, of all people, should know that, being as how I'm stuck out here on a very large rock in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.
0 Replies
 
Joeblow
 
  3  
Reply Tue 14 Aug, 2012 03:53 pm
Tomato sauce?! <shivers> A little ketchup would be ok though.

I had some of the good stuff from a chip truck on the weekend. Great french fries. Generous amount of curds. Oodles of hot brown gravy. I added lots of pepper and a smidge of fresh ground salt. The curds were at various stages of melting and each bite was better than the last. Heaven! But, I'm probably good for another year. It does, um...stick to your ribs.

I had fresh cheese curds once that were so good I've been longing for them again for years. They were warm, a touch greasy in the paper bag, and had a little salt and garlic. I could have eaten the entire bag myself, but had to settle with sharesies. Thank you Jennifer.
 

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