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Are you aimless?

 
 
Reply Thu 24 May, 2012 08:48 am
I just realized today that I don't know what my ultimate purpose in life is.

Do you have an ultimate purpose in life, and if so, how did you come about discovering it?
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Type: Question • Score: 10 • Views: 6,020 • Replies: 57
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JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 May, 2012 09:51 am
@Val Killmore,
Little by little. Now it's too late. Drunk

Just kidding. Actually I've achieved at long last a state of relative aimlessness which is just delicious--but that's only after retirement and financial security. I don't think I had much of a chance of securing this state of mind when I was young, financially insecure and with an unstable identity (not to mention a love life).
Oh! and regular meditation helps...definitely.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  2  
Reply Thu 24 May, 2012 10:48 am
@Val Killmore,
Quote:
Do you have an ultimate purpose in life, and if so, how did you come about discovering it?
One thing, is not to be terribly concerned about ultimate purposes
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 May, 2012 11:18 am
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:
One thing, is not to be terribly concerned about ultimate purposes


Agreed 100%.
0 Replies
 
Val Killmore
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 May, 2012 11:27 am
@dalehileman,
Ya, I suppose, but a purpose does simplify life a bit more.

Aimlessness gets me into trouble all the time.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 May, 2012 02:42 pm
@Val Killmore,
Quote:
a purpose does simplify life a bit more
I’m
not so sure. The humanoid has a habit of sticking to an unsatisfying course for fear of ridicule should he back off
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 May, 2012 02:49 am
Hitler, Stalin and Pol Pot had 'purposes'. OK so did Albert Schweitzer I suppose. He wasn't a ball of fire at parties from what I heard.

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Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 May, 2012 02:59 am
@Val Killmore,
Quote:
a purpose does simplify life a bit more.


Quite the opposite, in my opinion. Having such a purpose imposes standards of achievement that are not always easily met. That only complicates things. One finds oneself striving to achieve something which may turn out not to be achievable. That hardly simplifies one's life. Life is simplified by accepting it on its own terms with no pre-conceived notions or lofty goals.

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Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Fri 25 May, 2012 03:04 am
The only purposes in life which i can consider to be worthwhile are to be a "good" man who tries to do no harm, and to be just and considerate of others. Not too much, though . . . angels are a bore.
Val Killmore
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 May, 2012 10:00 am
@dalehileman,
Quote:
I’m
not so sure. The humanoid has a habit of sticking to an unsatisfying course for fear of ridicule should he back off


I see what you mean there. Then, what you are indirectly saying is to say happiness is the key to life.

Which means to say, find the truth and beauty in life, which of course brings happiness.

That's a good purpose, finding the truth and beauty in life.
Idea
Smile
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Fri 25 May, 2012 10:12 am
@Val Killmore,
Happiness is, and has always been, the key. The only question remaining is "what brings happiness?" I would suggest that getting what you want and what you work for does not bring hapiness. It only brings a desire for more. What brings hapiness isn't getting what you want; it's being grateful for what you've got.
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dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 May, 2012 10:16 am
@Val Killmore,
Quote:
That's a good purpose, finding the truth and beauty in life.
Well put Val
That is, if you don’t encounter excessive anxiety in the process, trying to determine what’s beautiful or true
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JLNobody
 
  2  
Reply Fri 25 May, 2012 03:47 pm
@Setanta,
And demons are exciting? Wink

By the way, I have the clear sense that you ARE a "good man who does no (serious) harm. But your principal virtue is seen in the effort you make to provide us with laboriously researched, carefully considered, and useful historical posts. That alone shows your lack of anti-sociability.
(I'm confident that Snood agrees)
0 Replies
 
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 May, 2012 04:01 pm
@Val Killmore,
That is SO true, Val. And it's the principal reason to get a good higher education. It respresents and prepares one for the creation of a satisfying life, something that cannot come from financial wealth alone. People who appreciate good philosophy and art are people who have greater capacity for the enjoyment and appreciation of their (inevitably brief) lives.
If they can also participate in the production of truth and the creation of beauty so much the better.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 May, 2012 06:23 pm
@JLNobody,
Quote:
If they can also participate in the production of truth and the creation of beauty so much the better.
It can. But it can also emphasize the hopelessness of it all
JLNobody
 
  2  
Reply Fri 25 May, 2012 08:35 pm
@dalehileman,
I should say that the very process of attempting to generate insights and beauty is sufficient for the good life. No need to achieve absolute Truth or perfect beauty. Indeed, ideals can be great obstacles to a good reality (real life).
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Fri 25 May, 2012 10:32 pm
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:

Quote:
If they can also participate in the production of truth and the creation of beauty so much the better.
It can. But it can also emphasize the hopelessness of it all


"Hopelessness" is a subjective personal judgement. What may be emblematic of hopelessness to one, may well be a thrilling, hopeful challenge to another.
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 May, 2012 10:34 pm
@JLNobody,
Absolutely true, JL. Only saints achieve anything even approaching perfection. And in order to be canonized a saint, one has to die first, preferably a martyr. What's the point?
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  2  
Reply Fri 25 May, 2012 11:15 pm
I suppose I could be considered aimless. I do check out the sights on a new piece, but after the initial shakedown, I'm more into point shooting.

I suppose David will disagree, but that's about par for the course.
0 Replies
 
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 May, 2012 11:50 pm
@Val Killmore,
Quote:
Becoming is the denial of Being

J. Krishnamurti
 

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