Reply Fri 27 Jan, 2012 05:20 pm
Lets try this again.(Didnt last long the past attempt)

One person post a word or phrase and the next person try to give its etymological roots. Then, that person posts another word or phrase and so on snd so on).Course, we can divert of theres a disagreement on a word but the first person who posted has his or her word that must be etymologigized
Wanna try?

My forst is a phrase:


"Give em the whole nine yards"

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Type: Discussion • Score: 8 • Views: 2,471 • Replies: 31
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boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jan, 2012 05:24 pm
@farmerman,
I just learned this a couple of weeks ago!

9 yards was the length of an ammunition belt.
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jan, 2012 05:24 pm
@boomerang,
You gotta post one now for the game to go on

Cycloptichorn
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jan, 2012 05:27 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Oh. Okay.... I haven't really prepared so I hope this one counts...

What does it mean to "mark twain"?
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jan, 2012 05:27 pm
@boomerang,
Ammo belt of what, ya goota be specific (PS youre only half done, post a word or phrase or Ill have ta do it) .
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jan, 2012 05:28 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Cycloptichorn wrote:

You gotta post one now for the game to go on

Cycloptichorn


you gotta post one now for the game to go on, is a phrase made popular in early 2012 by a2k poster cycloptichorn, it means, to post a phrase to advance the game

a stitch in time saves nine

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boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jan, 2012 05:29 pm
@farmerman,
Gosh, I don't remember. We were at Pearl Harbor and my brother pointed out a big gun and told us that's where the phrase came from.

I shouldn't be so quick to jump in! Sorry.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jan, 2012 05:39 pm
@boomerang,
We have

"The whole nine yards as a belt of ammo for a specific gun" what was it.BUT boomer is 100% correct (I only learned of it the other day boomer)
Now we have


A STITCH IN TIME SAVES NINE"- I have not a clue and Im not gonna go to a lookup srevice just yet.
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jan, 2012 05:41 pm
@farmerman,
what, nobody is gonna mark the twain?

what if we hit water less than two fathoms deep?
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jan, 2012 05:44 pm
@farmerman,
I think that one's pretty straightforward -- if you mend something with one stitch when it has just started to tear/ unravel, then you save the nine more stitches you'd need to make if you leave it for too long.

Think of say the seam of a glove, at the wrist, that's coming unstitched -- if you get it when there is just one stitch that's come out, you're done. If you wait, then it'll keep popping out stitches until you have to do more stitches to fix it.

Um, as for the next one.... I gotta think a bit. (If my explanation is rejected then I'm off the hook.)
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jan, 2012 05:44 pm
@farmerman,
Quote:
A STITCH IN TIME SAVES NINE"- I have not a clue and Im not gonna go to a lookup srevice just yet.


This is a early English phrase touting the benefits of preventative maintenance - the rhyming construction is a dead giveaway, there are lots of phrases from back then which use such a construction.

Here's one: Dog Days of Summer

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jan, 2012 05:44 pm
@Rockhead,
ya gotta wait yer turn-we have "A stitch in time" then we can do Sam
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jan, 2012 05:49 pm
@farmerman,
this game is kinda wacky and disorganized, eh?

mebbe you should appoint an arbiter.

I suggest spendius...
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jan, 2012 05:55 pm
@Rockhead,
yeh its getting there. No maybe johnboy. I believe spendi would be trying to change the subject every two minutes.

OK, last time, solve one then POSE ONE


MArk tWain is at six fathoms and it happens to be a pen name of some guy who wrote some funny ****.

HIGHBALL!
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jan, 2012 06:20 pm
@farmerman,
six fathoms is mighty deep for the big muddy...

http://boatsafe.com/nauticalknowhow/marktwain.htm

this is the same story that the gentleman driving the paddlewheeler outta Hannibal told me and some friends a few years back...
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  2  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 11:39 am
What a great game! Like its author it's slightly disorganized and chaotic...keep it like that!
0 Replies
 
Strauss
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 12:08 pm
Cycloptichorn wrote:
Here's one: Dog Days of Summer


Has it something to do with Sir Yuse and Saint Roch?
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 03:20 pm
@Strauss,
period of time that the sun is in Sirius "The dog star" it usually has a legendary connotation of the time when dogs go mad in the streets

goober peas
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 03:28 pm
@farmerman,
Goober comes from gubertorial, like "Ol' Bob was a pretty good goober, but he just couldn't keep his hands out of the cash register.
0 Replies
 
Strauss
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 03:30 pm
@farmerman,
So, it boils down to what it is worth: peanuts!
0 Replies
 
 

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