4
   

Is the Scarlet Letter Being Misinterpreted at School?

 
 
Reply Sun 27 Nov, 2011 06:41 pm
In English, we learned that the book was published to show that we shouldn't blindly judge others... however, in our US History class, we were told Hawthorne published it to prove that "sins have consequences". I know this isn't the best source, but Wikipedia said it was similar to Adam and Eve, which goes along with our history class. But like I said before, our English class keeps saying the book is saying we shouldn't judge others because we don't know all the circumstances of the situation. What do you think?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 4 • Views: 1,514 • Replies: 7
No top replies

 
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Sun 27 Nov, 2011 07:03 pm
@mouthofrandom,
Can't there be more than one interpretation?
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Nov, 2011 07:15 pm
@mouthofrandom,
I'm really curious as to why you'd be discussing this book in history class.

I'm with jespah, there is more than one way to read the book. "An American Tragedy" is another great example of two-fold interpretation.
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2011 02:36 pm
@mouthofrandom,
I always thought it was a lot more about hypocrisy, guilt and the wages of sin (but not Hester's). I think both of your classes are selling it short. Have you read the book? I know I really didn't get all of it when I read it in ninth grade. I read it again as an adult, then called my old English teacher to tell her I finally understood.
George
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2011 02:49 pm
@engineer,
engineer wrote:
. . . I read it again as an adult, then called my old English teacher to tell her
I finally understood.
Kewl
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2011 03:18 pm
@mouthofrandom,
I've read this book several times and love it.

Unless you speak directly to the author or perhaps read an intrepretation about the book by the author - can you really know what the author was meaning 100%.

I can see both being applicable and not necessarily conflicting. "Sin" or doing wrong does have consequences and it certainly shows this in the book - also not judging others makes sense as you can see as you get to know the characters and understand them - it isn't so black and white.

Maybe one class is focusing on one aspect of it, while the other is focusing on another. I always thought it was showing how historical we have treated people that committed a sin, but perhaps we should learn from this and look deeper at the situation. I mean poor Hester being married to that grumpy old man that treated her so horribly - how could you blame him - her hubby wasn't so innocent himself.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2011 03:19 pm
@boomerang,
It is a historical fiction - I could see reading it in history (can't remember if I did - I think I actually read it as part of my middle school history class) - and then again in high school in literature.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  2  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2011 03:20 pm
@engineer,
Definately a book you need to re-read as an adult - I got much more out of it then.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

The best opening lines in literature - Discussion by Robert Gentel
The "N" Word and Classic Literature - Discussion by tsarstepan
Question re. Ethan Frome - Question by jbphilouza
Famous Author - Question by sophocles
Dialect of Bob, Son of Battle - Question by Maggie Tong
What is a good book to read next? - Question by nickadocker
J D Salinger - Discussion by edgarblythe
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Is the Scarlet Letter Being Misinterpreted at School?
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 10/23/2019 at 07:06:04