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Ever heard Charlie Chaplin speak?

 
 
Reply Fri 9 Sep, 2011 02:44 am
 
Frank Apisa
 
  4  
Reply Sat 10 Sep, 2011 09:45 am
@Robert Gentel,
Hey!

Just stopped by to see how things were going over here...and came across this post of yours. We haven’t talked in a long while.

Unfortunately, Charlie's character, like so many other posters on boards like this and contributors to letters to the editor...offer "Let's all unite and blah, blah, blah” as a “solution” to our myriad problems.

But "Let's all unite" is not a solution at all. At best, it is a hope...a wish...a dream; at worst, the stuff of which delusions are made.

Can’t tell the future, Robert, but my money would be on: We are not going to unite in common cause for anything in this country, in fact, more than likely we will fracture even further—and for smaller, more petty reasons.

We divide into "us" than "them" at the drop of a hat.

Here in New Jersey, the people from the southern part of the state seem almost to hate the people from the northern part...and the people in the northern part return that sentiment in full measure.

Nope, even with the science fiction notion of a common enemy—danger from aliens from another place or time—to unite us, we seem incapable or unwilling to do it.

Maybe it is for the better. Balkanization seems to be in the making…and the Balkanization of the United States might be the best thing for all of us.

Hope things are good with you.
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Sep, 2011 09:55 am
Interesting sentiments but I don't see them as much more than words for most. Many take talk a good game but push comes to shove they cave.
for money, for standing in a community or the world or other reasons such as cowardice but cave they do.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Sep, 2011 05:45 pm
@Frank Apisa,
Hiya Frank!
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 09:32 am
Yeah, I've heard Charlie Chaplin speak. Lots of times. Every time he opened his mouth to speak, you realized just how lucky he was that he could make a successful career out of not speaking.

Chaplin reissued The Gold Rush, his 1925 silent classic, in the 1940s with a recorded score (by him) and with the intertitles replaced with a spoken narration (his, of course). The narration was terrible -- in some places it injected a heavy dash of pathos (Chaplin's true metier) where it wasn't needed, and it generally wasn't nearly as funny as the original intertitles. It is a tribute to his rare genius that, even after being abused by its creator, The Gold Rush is still a great movie.

But that was Chaplin. He was a total control freak, a Victorian sentimentalist, and a complete political naif. His speech at the end of The Great Dictator is, without question, the worst thing about that movie. Indeed, it's one of the worst endings in movie history. In general, the problem in The Great Dictator is that it's a political satire made by someone who knew nothing about satire.
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 11:42 am
@Frank Apisa,
Frank Apisa wrote:
Just stopped by to see how things were going over here...and came across this post of yours. We haven’t talked in a long while.


Yeah, you missed my conversion to Christianity and all.

Quote:
Unfortunately, Charlie's character, like so many other posters on boards like this and contributors to letters to the editor...offer "Let's all unite and blah, blah, blah” as a “solution” to our myriad problems.

But "Let's all unite" is not a solution at all. At best, it is a hope...a wish...a dream; at worst, the stuff of which delusions are made.


I agree, and was thinking about it this weekend, how it's so very lovely and all but so very... naive. But it then occurred to me that it is not politics but art, and that there should be given dramatic license to them, and political poetry should be evaluated on more than just the political level.

But yeah, I agree, it's a lot of generally beautiful sentiments, I didn't post it for it's political content, mainly because I think this might be the first time I've seen him speak.
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 12:20 pm
@Robert Gentel,
The films having Chaplin's voice are in BOLD ---BBB

Image Entertainment - First National and United Artists Films
restored by David Shepard and Roy Export - 1990's

A collection of the Chaplin films restored and remastered by David Shepard and his associates during the 1990's. These films were from United Artists, First National and Britain Films. Available in the U.S., this now out-of-print collection was unique, because the films were returned to their original theatrical release versions, including all the scenes Chaplin had removed during the 1940's thru the 70's. Chaplin felt the deleted scenes didn't suit a modern day audience.

In the see-saw of versions the latest and current Warner Bros. Chaplin Collection has once again deleted the footage that was included in this 1990's remastering.

The Warner Bros. versions have the better sound and film quality, but the Shepard versions have scenes in the actual films available now only in this collection. The films that received the most editing were the pre-sound era films, which included films like The Kid and Pay Day. All the films before City Lights were true silent films (no soundtrack on the actual released films). All the films from City Lights onward had a soundtrack composed by Chaplin. This is why the pre-City Lights films have the most versions, because Chaplin was not dealing with a pre-recorded sound track. And that is why Shepard and Roy Export had the option to re-create the original silent versions of these early films. So now, there are in some case, two editions of these early works.

These out-of-print films are still available at Amazon, as used or occasionally still new, factory sealed editions. The most collectable are the Charlie Chaplin First National Collection and The Kid and A Dog's Life . Please note, many bootleg versions are showing up on the market. SEE the COVERS BELOW and be careful who you buy from. (Note: This collection is only available on DVD.)

This rare DVD contains six of the First National Films and the bonus feature 'Nice and Friendly', with Lord and Lady Mountbatten and Jackie Coogan. It also includes scenes now deleted from the current Chaplin Collection.

Films included: 'Shoulder Arms', 'Sunnyside', 'A Day's Pleasure', 'The Idle Class', 'Pay Day' and 'The Pilgrim'.

The best part about this collection is seeing the films in nearly their full original theatrical release versions.

The films did have film speeds corrected, but there was no budget to rescore the music, so the music was adjusted to fit the restored film and is not the smoothest. But a great collection to have for the rare film edits not available on any of the new collections.

Beware: Many bootleg versions on the market. Must look like this cover from Image Entertainment CBS/FOX USA release.

The Kid and A Dog's Life
Charlie Chaplin in The Kid and A Dog's Life
Image Entertainment - collectable
with Edna Purviance and Jackie Coogan as The Kid

This is becoming a collector's item for fans who want to see the original 1921 version of 'The Kid', which is not available in the new Chaplin Collection series. This version is the best one for seeing more of Edna Purviance's scenes and more of the story about the child's parents.

It is still available, but getting rare. 'The Kid' and 'First National Collection' are the most valuable from this set of films. 'A Dog's Life' co-stars Edna Purviance and Sydney Chaplin.

Beware: Many bootleg versions are on the market. Must look like this cover with 'A Dog's Life' from Image Entertainment CBS/FOX USA release.


The Gold Rush
Charlie Chaplin in The Gold Rush
Image Entertainment
with Georgia Hale and Mack Swain

1942 version with the intertitle removed and Chaplin speaking the narrative. It was also is the edition re-edited with scenes like the ending changed.

For most fans the original 1925 silent version is the favorite. Both 1925 and 1942 versions are now included in the new Chaplin Collection DVD set from Warner Home Video.

Includes an interview with Lita Grey Chaplin, original scenario called 'The Lucky Strike - A Play in Two Scenes', and production photos.


The Circus
Charlie Chaplin in The Circus - 1928
Image Entertainment
with Merna Kennedy and Harry Crocker

A very popular film for many Chaplin fans, even if it wasn't very popular with Chaplin. Has the favorite funhouse scenes that includes the house of mirrors and Chaplin on the high wire, which he learned how to walk from Henry Bergman. This film opens like the original silent version. Chaplin created music in the late 60's, early 70's for this film. Film was originally shown with live music, like all the Chaplin films before 'City Lights'.

Includes the extras: the deleted 1970's reissued title and credits with Chaplin singing 'Swing Little Girl', and film footage with Chaplin, Kennedy and Crocker at a cafe with David Shepard narrative. Set sketches by Charles D. Hall and daily production reports.

City Lights

Charlie Chaplin in City Lights - 1931
Image Entertainment
with Virginia Cherrill

One of Chaplin's most popular movies about a tramp, a drunk and a blind flower girl. This DVD has both the original 1931 Chaplin-recorded film score and Carl Davis' digital recording of the same music. This was the earliest recorded soundtrack of all of Chaplin's films.

Includes an interview with Carl Davis, production and publicity information.

Note: Carl Davis' City Lights recording is available on CD, and is included in the Limited Edition City Lights 3-disc set. The Royal Festival Hall in London also has a store where is it available. See the Charlie Chaplin Festival article for more details.

Modern Times

Charlie Chaplin in Modern Times - 1936
Image Entertainment
with Paulette Goddard

Chaplin's last silent film, released in 1936. It was Paulette Goddard's first starring role and made her a star. It is about Charlie's battle in the machine world, strikes and unemployment, and the 'The Gamin' who join him in the battle.

Modern Times' theme music is well known as the melody for 'Smile'. Includes original story notes, shooting log and production reports.

The Great Dictator

Charlie Chaplin in The Great Dictator - 1940
Image Entertainment
with Paulette Goddard and Jack Oakie

Chaplin's first talking film about a Jewish barber who happens to look like the dictator Hynkel. With Jack Oakie as Benzino Napaloni. Made before WWII, it was Chaplin's first talking picture.

Includes a deleted barbershop scene from Sunnyside, Fox Movietone Newsreel about Hitler, original story notes, drafts of scripts and production records and more.


Monsieur Verdoux
Charlie Chaplin in Monsieur Verdoux - 1947
Image Entertainment
with Martha Raye and Marilyn Nash

Monsieur Verdoux was Chaplin's dark comedy about a out-of-work French bank clerk who leads a life as a 'bluebeard'. He marries and murders his 'wives' for money to help out his real wife and son.

Includes sketches of sets, production photos and records and original segments of the script with changes suggested by the Breen Office. (The censors of Chaplin's day.)

Limelight

Charlie Chaplin in Limelight - 1952
Image Entertainment
with Clare Bloom, Sydney Chaplin and Buster Keaton

Chaplin's last America film created at the Chaplin Film Studio. This film has several of Chaplin's own children in roles including a supporting role played by Charlie's son, Sydney Chaplin. Plus Chaplin's half-brother, Wheeler Dryden, playing the part of the doctor.

The story is about an aging clown, Calvero, who helps a young ballerina Terry rise to fame.

Includes deleted footage after the premiere, the 1919 original flea circus routine and working text from the novel upon which this film is based.


A King of New York

A King of New York - 1957
Image Entertainment
with Dawn Addams and Michael Chaplin

King of New York was the last film starring Chaplin. It is about an exiled King who travels to New York and America's commercialized society.

It was created in Britian and is not one of Chaplin's popular films. Extras includes film footage of Chaplin conducting for the King of New York score.


A Woman of Paris - 1923
Image Entertainment
with Edna Purviance and Adolphe Menjou

'A Woman of Paris' was Chaplin's first drama and first Untied Artists Film. (Chaplin co-founded United Artists.) This is Edna Purviance's first starring role and her last film under Chaplin's direction. The film broke new ground and was critically acclaimed in 1923. Our research so far is showing that the film played in theaters much longer than popularly reported, and was more favored by the public than has been described in Chaplin literature.

It is actually a very good silent film that should be in any silent film collection.

Learn more from this excellent article on the film: 'A Woman of Paris'.

A King of New York

Charlie Chaplin Boxed Set - 2000
Image Entertainment
with The Gold Rush, City Lights, The Great Dictator, Modern Times

0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 12:29 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Not sure what the video is about as my system admin has blocked YouTube videos but The Great Dictator is a talkie. So my answer would be an indirect yes.
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 12:41 pm
@tsarstepan,
It's some climatic speech, sounds like it was at the end.

Looks like I'm the only one around that has seen as little Chaplin as I have. I'm not that into movies but if there's a netflix-streamable film of his that is good I'd love a recommendation.
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 12:52 pm
@Robert Gentel,
I remembered that Netflix was supposed to work in Central America starting today without needing to use things like a US VPN, so I looked to see what was there and it looks like none are. I probably don't care enough about it to try harder so I don't want to waste anyone's time with recommendations.
joefromchicago
 
  3  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 01:32 pm
@Robert Gentel,
The Gold Rush appears to be available on Netflix-on-demand, but it's the 1942 re-release version. Some viewer comments:

Quote:
I only put one star on this movie because I urge everybody to RENT THE BONUS DISC first. All the first disc has on it is the 1942 'talkie' version that in my opinion ruins the movie. I was quite surprised that Chaplin did not only let this happen but also contributed to it by writing and voicing the 'descriptive dialogue' himself. Please rent the bonus disc. I don't know what the people at Warner Bros. were thinking when they put the remake of the movie on the first disc. It is rather quite sad.


Quote:
I know it's been said on here already, but I must also chime in. The original 1925 silent version on the Bonus Disc is the REAL, ORIGINAL (not to mention SUPERIOR) version of the film. The 1942 re-release version is a travesty of needlessly chopping up a great film, proving that even geniuses like Chaplin in his heyday aren't above making some missteps. Why the Chaplin Estate continues to preserve this version as the "official" version of The Gold Rush is beyond me; even if Charlie himself preferred it, anybody with the slightest sense of film preservation will tell you otherwise.


Quote:
Rent the Bonus Material disc--not this one. This disc was released in 1942 with sound. Instead of reading cards you'll hear Chaplain narrating instead, which is really annoying. It takes away much of the humor and all of the magic of seeing an old silent film. The Bonus Material disc has the original film.


Quote:
GRRRRR. (fist shake)This version made me so angry. i almost cried. WHY! did charles do that voice over? WHY! What was he thinking? DAMN, i love him so hard. But there is no reason for this massive error in taste and judgement. It even repeats physical actions in words. IS IT A NARRATION FOR THE BLIND? i tried to watch with no sound but there were no cards. i tried to watch in french and that was distracting too. is the other version available from n-----x. I LOVE CHAPLIN! THIS VERSION SUCKS. A CLASSIC WAS DESECRATED WITH THAT REDUNDANT VOICE-OVER. I CANT BELIEVE THAT THIS PRESENTED AS THE PRIMARY VERSION. A desecration of elegant genius by himself as an after-thought. the first one was already a directors cut. bad move.


Heed their warnings: they know from whence they speak.

There are Chaplin shorts and even some full-length movies available on Youtube and other video sites. For instance, The Kid:

tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 01:39 pm
@Robert Gentel,
If you ever get to a DVD rental store:
1. Modern Times (1936)
2. The Great Dictator (1940)
3. City Lights (1931)

I'm more of a Harold Lloyd fan then a Charlie Chaplin fan.
wandeljw
 
  2  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 02:06 pm
@Frank Apisa,
Frank Apisa wrote:

Hey!

Just stopped by to see how things were going over here...and came across this post of yours. We haven’t talked in a long while.

Unfortunately, Charlie's character, like so many other posters on boards like this and contributors to letters to the editor...offer "Let's all unite and blah, blah, blah” as a “solution” to our myriad problems.

But "Let's all unite" is not a solution at all. At best, it is a hope...a wish...a dream; at worst, the stuff of which delusions are made.

Can’t tell the future, Robert, but my money would be on: We are not going to unite in common cause for anything in this country, in fact, more than likely we will fracture even further—and for smaller, more petty reasons.

We divide into "us" than "them" at the drop of a hat.

Here in New Jersey, the people from the southern part of the state seem almost to hate the people from the northern part...and the people in the northern part return that sentiment in full measure.

Nope, even with the science fiction notion of a common enemy—danger from aliens from another place or time—to unite us, we seem incapable or unwilling to do it.

Maybe it is for the better. Balkanization seems to be in the making…and the Balkanization of the United States might be the best thing for all of us.

Hope things are good with you.


I wish you would try to be serious. At least once, Frank!

Anyway, there is a funny and true story about Charlie Chaplin. Once when he was visiting Paris, a nightclub was having a Charlie Chaplin look-alike contest. He went to that nightclub and entered the contest. He came in third place.
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 07:55 pm
@tsarstepan,
Unfortunately here in Costa Rica, the DVD rental stores are pretty bad. Usually pirated DVDs and very poor selection (no way they'll have those).
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 07:58 pm
@joefromchicago,
joefromchicago wrote:
The Gold Rush appears to be available on Netflix-on-demand, but it's the 1942 re-release version.


I looked and didn't see it earlier, but Netflix just opened to Costa Rica today and things are weird on Netflix. When I login to my US account from a Costa Rican IP address my queue is down to about 10 titles (from about 100) and it seems a lot less is available to stream from here even though they are now open in this market.

If I want to see that I guess I'll have to use a US IP address. What a pain in the ass content licensing is.
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 09:47 pm
@joefromchicago,
joefromchicago wrote:
There are Chaplin shorts and even some full-length movies available on Youtube and other video sites. For instance, The Kid:


Thanks for that, I've been watching it on one screen while I work in another, and have been enjoying the timeless slapstick. Good stuff!
0 Replies
 
Lambchop
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2011 12:28 am
Quote:
Monsieur Verdoux
Charlie Chaplin in Monsieur Verdoux - 1947
Image Entertainment
with Martha Raye and Marilyn Nash


Actually, Monsieur Verdoux was a "talkie" too.

Quote:
He was a total control freak, a Victorian sentimentalist, and a complete political naif.


I think this is a good description of Chaplin. Of course, his politics were shaped by the fact that he grew up in abject poverty, and it's pretty obvious (even in his early silent films) that he always leaned towards socialism. Guess you can't really blame him.

I sometimes wonder if someone like Chaplin today, growing up in such poverty and with limited formal education, could become the success that Chaplin became.

I'd have to agree though, about the speech in The Great Dictator, that it's an overly self-indulgent moment. Still, to give him credit again, not many people in 1940 (especially here in the US) were taking the Nazi threat very seriously. Chaplin really went out on a limb making this film.

Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2011 12:18 pm
Robert Gentel wrote: Yeah, you missed my conversion to Christianity and all.

Uhh…yeah. Hold ‘em will do that to ya. If you want the cure for that, I suggest Omaha Hi/Lo!
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 14 Sep, 2011 02:43 pm
@Frank Apisa,
I knew that leg would be a hard one to pull.

Nice to see ya around! Have you been playing poker? I hadn't been playing much at all and now that my online bankroll and accounts are frozen (because I am American most sites don't want to let me play due to the legal problems they have stateside) I haven't bothered trying to find a game.
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Sep, 2011 02:55 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Just got back and saw this reply, Robert. Yeah, like you I am blacked out on the Internet. My account at PokerStars is frozen...not a lot in it; I am not an especially good player. But the news seems to be that some US casinos are going to get into the on-line poker business soon.

Looking forward to it!

Actually, I did become an Omaha player. Really love the game more than Hold 'em...although I play Hold 'em in local Firehouse tourneys. (Live, I seem to be a winner more than on-line.)

Gonna try to post a few things here in A2K during the next month.

I've reformed...almost no yelling, screaming, or fire breathing at all in my other forum (Open Salon). And I keep the baiting to a minimum...unless I see someone who enjoys baiting other people.

I'm trying to be reasonable and calm in my posts and threads...which often is a big test of will-power when discussing the two things I discuss most, politics and religion (agnosticism).

Hope all is well with you. Maybe we will have some discussions if I get back to posting.

f.
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