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Smuggling Money out of the Country?

 
 
MrIVI
 
Reply Sun 27 Feb, 2011 06:41 pm
I'm a screenwriter, and I'm looking into what options would seem like good ideas for smuggling money out of the country. I have a character that needs to attempts an escape from the country with millions of dollars and little time to plan. What would seem like good possibilities? I'm not sure how doable bank transfers are. He has about two million in cash. If he took two million to the bank attempted to deposit it and transfer it to an off shore account I'm almost certain that would be put on a lengthy waiting period. And since in a few days he will be officially a fugitive, I suspect the transfer would get flagged and stopped. So what about just mailing cash out of the country? What are other good possibilities? Ultimately, I want the guy to get caught but I want to make it look like a good try not just a completely idiotic stunt.
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Type: Question • Score: 7 • Views: 8,745 • Replies: 20
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parados
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Feb, 2011 07:30 pm
@MrIVI,
I'm pretty sure he could send it to someone in Nigeria by Western Union.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Feb, 2011 07:40 pm
@MrIVI,
Maybe he could cram it into a large stuffed toy and mail it to a (make believe) baby somewhere?
0 Replies
 
Fido
 
  0  
Reply Sun 27 Feb, 2011 07:46 pm
@MrIVI,
Get some one to sell you empty boxes from Abroad and wire them payments through a bank... I am a better screenwriter than you and I have never written a screen play... Need a story???
MrIVI
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Feb, 2011 08:03 pm
@Fido,
This is an interesting solution!
But still I'm pretty certain any wire transfer of funds over 20 grand is held for 4-5 days and approved some sort of government agency. Remember though in like 2 days this guy's going to officially be a fugitive. And I don't know how possible it would be for him to wire it from a false identity that would withstand close-inspection. Maybe I should actually go talk to my local bank?
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Feb, 2011 07:45 am
@MrIVI,
Your crimminal is no master because he sufferes from a lack of planning which reveals a want of intelligence... Too late, he should find only a good hiding place, and get out with a bag of loot... A man with money is a man in danger, but a man with hidden cash has a chance; unless some one should consider that a bird in the hand is worth a pipe dream any day... The ideal situation is to lay down a false trail, and go no where... Hide in plain sight... False documents... Cash for everything... No routine... No friends... Low key... A room in a house... No utilities bills... And hopfully, no money in need of laundering as that presnts other problem....

As dangerous as it might be; if one had to get out and hopefully have some cash at the end of the day, then cut a deal with the Chinese, or with the Russians... The Russians are purely dangerous, and we made them that way... The Chinese is this country have a largely cash economy... No Chinese man I know would ever go outside of his community for a loan of a large sum, and much is done with a handshake... Honor still counts for something with some people, but a man with no honor, a crook, a thief, a fraud has no appeal to make for honor... A better story would be about trying to get money out of such bankers as a man on the run might have to resort to...
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Feb, 2011 07:57 am
any bank transactions involving cash above $10,000 have to be reported to the feds, last I heard.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Feb, 2011 12:55 pm
@MontereyJack,
True, but this is cash. I bet the rule does apply to Western Union, etc., though.
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Feb, 2011 12:57 pm
Man, I think A2K should get credit in your screenplays, with the number of ideas that you are getting from us.

Cycloptichorn
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 03:36 am
@Cycloptichorn,
one word


Diamonds.
BillRM
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 06:22 am
@MrIVI,
Try having your main character finding someone willing to convert the cash for him into untracable cryptocurrency and even at this early state of it development this currency can be then reconverted to normal world currency anywhere on the planet.

The last I hear one bitcoin is worth roughly one US dollar.



BitcoinFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Bitcoin
Developer(s) Satoshi Nakamoto, Gavin Andresen
Initial release February 4, 2ing009 (2009-02-04)
Stable release 0.3.20.01 / February 22, 2011; 7 days ago (2011-02-22)
Development status Beta
Written in C++
Operating system Windows, Linux, Mac OS X
Size 5.2 MiB - 9.7 MiB
Type Electronic money
License MIT License
Website bitcoin.org

Bitcoin is a digital currency created in 2009 by Satoshi Nakamoto. The name also refers to the open source software he designed that uses it, and the peer-to-peer network that it forms. Unlike most currencies, bitcoin does not rely on trusting any central issuer. Bitcoin uses a distributed database spread across nodes of a peer-to-peer network to journal transactions, and uses cryptography in order to provide basic security functions, such as ensuring that bitcoins can only be spent by the person who owns them, and never more than once.

Bitcoin's design allows for anonymous ownership and transfers of value. Bitcoins can be saved on a personal computer in the form of a wallet file or, kept with a third party wallet service, and in either case, can be sent over the Internet to anyone with a Bitcoin address. Bitcoin's peer-to-peer topology and lack of central administration make it infeasible for any governmental authority, or anyone else, to manipulate the value of bitcoins or induce inflation by producing more of them.

Bitcoin is one of the first implementations of a concept called cryptocurrency, first described in 1998 by Wei Dai on the cypherpunks mailing list.

Contents [hide]
1 Overview
2 Technical
2.1 Addresses
2.2 Transactions
2.3 Block-chain
2.4 Generating bitcoins
2.5 Transaction fees
3 Economics
3.1 Monetary differences
3.2 Outcome
4 See also
5 References
6 External links

OverviewBitcoin relies on the transfer of amounts between public accounts using public key cryptography. All transactions are public and stored in a distributed database. In order to prevent double-spending, the network implements some kind of a distributed time server, using the idea of chained proofs of work. Therefore, the whole history of transactions has to be stored inside the database, and in order to reduce the size of this storage, a Merkle tree is used.

Technical
Bitcoin software running under Windows 7Bitcoin is a peer-to-peer implementation of Wei Dai's b-money proposal and Nick Szabo's Bitgold proposal. The principles of the system are described in Satoshi Nakamoto's 2008 Bitcoin whitepaper.[1]

AddressesAny person participating in the bitcoin network has a wallet containing an arbitrary number of cryptographic keypairs. The public keys, or bitcoin addresses, act as the sending or receiving endpoints for all payments. Their corresponding private keys authorize payments from that user only. Addresses contain no information about their owner and are generally anonymous.[2] Addresses in human-readable form are strings of random numbers and letters around 33 characters in length, of the form 1rYK1YzEGa59pI314159KUF2Za4jAYYTd. Bitcoin users can own multiple addresses, and in fact can generate new ones without any limit, as generating a new address is relatively instantaneous, simply equivalent to generating a public/private key pair, and requires no contact with any nodes of the network. Creating single-purpose/single-use addresses can help preserve a user's anonymity.

TransactionsBitcoins contain the current owner's public key (address). When user A transfers some to user B, A relinquishes ownership on them by adding B’s public key (address) to those coins and signing them with his own private key.[3] He then broadcasts these bitcoins in an appropriate message, the transaction, on the peer-to-peer network. The rest of the network nodes validate the cryptographic signatures and the amounts of the transaction before accepting it.

Block-chain
The main chain (black) consists of the longest series of blocks from the genesis block (green) to the current block. Orphan blocks (grey) exist outside of the main chain.Any transaction broadcasted to other nodes does not become immediately official until acknowledged in a collectively-maintained timestamped-list of all known transactions, the block chain. This acknowledgment is based on a proof-of-work system to prevent double spending and counterfeiting.

In particular, each generating node collects all unacknowledged transactions it knows of in a candidate block, a file which among others[4], contains the cryptographic hash of the previous valid-block known to that node. It then tries to produce a cryptographic hash of that block with certain characteristics, an effort that requires a predictable amount of repetitious trial and error. When a node finds such a solution, it announces it to the rest of the network. Peers receiving the new solved-block validate it before accepting it, adding it to the chain.

Eventually, the block-chain contains the cryptographic ownership history of all coins from their creator-address to their current owner-address.[5] Therefore, if a user attempts to reuse coins he had already spent, the network will reject the transaction.

Generating bitcoinsThe Bitcoin network creates and distributes a batch of new bitcoins approximately six times per hour at random to somebody running the software with the "generate coins" option selected. Any user can potentially receive a batch by running it, or an equivalent program specialized for the equipment the user owns. Generating bitcoins is often referred to as "mining", a term analogous to gold mining.[1] The probability that a given user will receive a batch depends on the computing power he contributes to the network relative to the computing power of all nodes combined.[6] The amount of bitcoins created per batch is never more than 50 BTC, and the awards are programmed to decrease over time down to zero, such that no more than 21 million will ever exist.[2] As this payout decreases, the motive for users to run nodes is expected to change to earning transaction fees.

All generating nodes of the network are competing to be the first to find a solution to a cryptographic problem about their candidate-block, a problem that requires repetitious trial and error. When a node finds such a valid solution, it announces it to the rest of the network and claims a new batch of bitcoins. Peers receiving the new solved-block validate it before accepting it, adding it to the chain. Nodes can employ their CPUs using the standard client or use other software to take advantage of their GPUs.[2][7][8] Users can also generate bitcoins collectively.[9]

So that one block gets generated every ten minutes, each node separately readjusts the difficulty of the problem it tries to solve every two weeks according to any changes of the collective CPU-power of the peer-to-peer network.[citation needed]

Transaction feesBecause nodes have no obligation to include transactions in the blocks they generate, Bitcoin senders may voluntarily pay a transaction fee. Doing so will speed up the transaction and provide incentive for users to run nodes, especially as the difficulty of generating bitcoins increases or the reward per block amount decreases over time. Nodes collect the transaction fees associated with all transactions included in their candidate block.[2]

EconomicsBitcoin
ISO 4217 Code none[10]; BTC used colloquially[11]
User(s) Supranational, Internet-based
Inflation Approximately predetermined[1]
Central bank None; decentralized, distributed
The Bitcoin economy is still small relative to long-since established economies and the software is still in the beta stage of development. But real goods and services, such as used cars and freelance software development contracts, are now being traded. Bitcoins are accepted for both online services and tangible goods.[12] The Electronic Frontier Foundation and Singularity Institute accept bitcoin donations.[13][14] Traders exchange regular currency (including US dollars, Russian rubles, and Japanese yen) for bitcoins through exchange sites.[15][self-published source?][16] Anyone can view the block-chain and observe transactions in real-time. Various services facilitate such monitoring.[17][18]

Monetary differences
Total Bitcoin supply over time.As opposed to conventional fiat currency, the bitcoin differs in that no overseer can control the value due to its decentralized nature,[19] mitigating possible instability caused by central banks. There is a limited controlled inflation hardcoded in the Bitcoin software, but it is predictable and known to all parties in advance.[1] Inflation cannot therefore be centrally manipulated to effect redistribution of value from general users.

Transfers are facilitated directly without the use of a financial processor between nodes. This type of transaction makes chargebacks impossible. The Bitcoin client broadcasts the transaction to surrounding nodes who propagate the payment across the network. Corrupted or invalid transactions are rejected by honest clients. Transactions are mostly free, however a fee may be paid to other nodes to prioritize transaction processing.[1]

The total number of bitcoins tends to 21 million over time. The money supply grows as a geometric series every 4 years; by 2013 half of the total supply will have been generated, and by 2017, 3/4 will have been generated. As it approaches that mark the value of bitcoins will likely begin to experience price deflation (increase in real value) due to the lack of new introduction. Bitcoins, however, are divisible to eight decimal places (giving 2.1 x 1015 total units), removing practical limitations to downward price adjustments in a deflationary environment.[2] Rather than relying on the incentive of newly created bitcoins to record transactions into blocks, nodes in this period are expected to depend on their ability to competitively collect transaction fees to process transactions.[1]

OutcomePossible failure scenarios for Bitcoin include a currency devaluation, a declining user base, or a global governmental crackdown on the software. However, it may not be possible to "ban all crypto-cash like Bitcoin."[20] The decentralization and anonymity embodied by Bitcoin appears to be a reaction to the U.S. government's prosecution of digital currency companies like e-gold and Liberty Dollar.[21] In an Irish Times investigative article Danny O'Brien reported "When I show people this Bitcoin economy, they ask: 'Is this legal?' They ask: 'Is it a con?' I imagine there are lawyers and economists struggling to answer both questions. I suspect you will be able to add lawmakers to that list shortly."[20]

In February 2011, the coverage at Slashdot and the subsequent Slashdot effect affected the value of the bitcoin and the availability of some related sites.[22][23][citation needed]

See also Business and economics portal
Free software portal
Numismatics portal
Anonymous internet banking
Crypto-anarchy
DigiCash
eCache
GoldMoney
Hashcash
Pecunix
Ripple monetary system
Yodelbank
References^ a b c d e f Nakamoto, Satoshi (24 May 2009). Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System. http://www.bitcoin.org/sites/default/files/bitcoin.pdf. Retrieved 14 December 2010.
^ a b c d e Nathan Willis (2010-11-10). "Bitcoin: Virtual money created by CPU cycles". LWN.net. http://lwn.net/Articles/414452/.
^ https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Transactions
^ "Bitcoin Wiki: Block Hashing Algorithm". http://www.bitcoin.org/wiki/doku.php?id=block_hashing_algorithm.
^ "Bitcoin Block Explorer". http://blockexplorer.com/.
^ Luongo, Thomas (2010-07-23). "The FED’s Real Monetary Problem". LewRockwell.com. http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig6/luongo7.1.1.html. Retrieved 2010-10-12.
^ DiabloMiner, OpenCL miner for BitCoin
^ poclbm, Python OpenCL bitcoin miner
^ Bitcoin Pooled Mining
^ "Current currency & funds code list". SNV-SIX Interbank Clearing. http://www.currency-iso.org/iso_index/iso_tables/iso_tables_a1.htm. Retrieved 10 February 2010.
^ Bitcoin website. Main page, FAQ, and (extensively) Trade page all use the abbreviation "BTC".
^ "Bitcoin Trade". Bitcoin.org. http://www.bitcoin.org/trade. Retrieved 22 December 2010.
^ EFF Bitcoin donation page
^ SIAI donation page
^ Bitcoin Charts
^ Thomas, Keir (2010-10-10). "Could the Wikileaks Scandal Lead to New Virtual Currency?". PC World. http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/213230/could_the_wikileaks_scandal_lead_to_new_virtual_currency.html. Retrieved 2010-10-10.
^ bitcoinwatch.com
^ bitcoinmonitor.com
^ Bitcoin FAQ
^ a b O'Brien, Danny (26 November 2010). "Imagine your computer as a wallet full of Bitcoins". The Irish Times. http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/finance/2010/1126/1224284180416.html. Retrieved 19 December 2010.
^ Herpel, Mark (6 December 2010). "2011 Observations on the Digital Currency Industry". SSRN (Article for DGC magazine Jan2011). http://ssrn.com/abstract=1721076. Retrieved 19 December 2010.
^ Online-Only Currency Bitcoin Reaches Dollar Parity via Slashdot.
^ Bitcoin Charts
External linksOfficial website
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 07:33 am
@roger,
Quote:
True, but this is cash. I bet the rule does apply to Western Union, etc., though.


You would loss that bet as it even apply to car dealerships.
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 06:00 pm
@dadpad,
dadpad wrote:

one word


Diamonds.
If you had a million dollars to get out of the country the premium you would pay to get it through an existing channel would likely leave you with only ten percent... If you wanted more, you would have to convince some one there was much more to be had from the same place down the line... But just as likely, the one with the means would end up with the cash, and the one without the plan would lose life and money without a trace... No person should have more cash than they can defend, and to have more is an invitation to destruction...Better to take a blood bath and then swim with the sharks... Why would anyone trust in the kindness of strangers if another alternative presented itself??? In short; there is simply no fast way that is also safe to transport illegal money... As soon as some one knows the money is there a clock starts ticking on ones life... It is a place certain where time is money... The more time you have, the more you might end up with...
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 07:41 pm
@BillRM,
Yess Bill. That's why I am willing to bet the rule does apply to Western Union.
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 08:49 pm
All monetary transaction of over $10,000 cash are supposed to be reported.
Whether there would be a response within 2 days is hard to say.

$2 million in cash is about 8 sq feet and weighs about 44 lbs.

One possibility is to divide it into small packages that are sent FED EX or UPS to hotels in Canada or more likely Mexico. Send the package to be held for hotel guest of a certain name. Send packages to 4 or 5 hotels in a city. Get a room at each hotel when you arrive and collect the packages. You risk losing some of the packages in transit if inspected. You also risk getting arrested when collecting the packages or at least questioned by state authorities if they decide to use the packages as bait to see why you are shipping money.
BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 09:17 pm
@parados,
Have your hero go to a bar in NYC where third world diplomats from the UN are known to hang out and then bribe one of them to carry the money out of the country in a diplomatic pouch.

Fido
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 07:32 am
@BillRM,
BillRM wrote:

Have your hero go to a bar in NYC where third world diplomats from the UN are known to hang out and then bribe one of them to carry the money out of the country in a diplomatic pouch.


Why not hire a hit man or blow your own brains out... Cash is dangerous, and the more easy it is the more death it would draw...
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 10:54 am
@Fido,
Quote:
Why not hire a hit man or blow your own brains out... Cash is dangerous, and the more easy it is the more death it would draw...


?????????????????????????????????????????????????????
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  2  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 11:34 am
@MrIVI,
MrIVI wrote:
So what about just mailing cash out of the country? What are other good possibilities? Ultimately, I want the guy to get caught but I want to make it look like a good try not just a completely idiotic stunt.


You could try just having him try to fly it out. You can usually only bring $10K (or equivalent) into a country when you travel and you can use the airport scene dramatically (at least more so than a random postal inspection scene).
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Fri 4 Mar, 2011 11:40 am
@Robert Gentel,
Robert Gentel wrote:

MrIVI wrote:
So what about just mailing cash out of the country? What are other good possibilities? Ultimately, I want the guy to get caught but I want to make it look like a good try not just a completely idiotic stunt.


You could try just having him try to fly it out. You can usually only bring $10K (or equivalent) into a country when you travel and you can use the airport scene dramatically (at least more so than a random postal inspection scene).
The story is a bad one which cannot be improved upon by the making of the impossible probable... Criminal are amoral, or immoral; but unless intelligent have nothing to recommend them to our attention... Who are these characters??? Are we to give them an hour of or lives when their lives are not worth a minute of our attention??? Why are the anti-heroes of Greek drama great??? Is it because a light was shone upon them; or because without light they were as great??? It is to the great that we turn our attention, and where is the greatness in this criminal???

He suffers from lack of intelligence... His failure is not in doubt, but of course... Even when the survival of the fittest is rejected, or not at all certain, the failure of the dumasses is a given... What you need is a story, from top to bottom... One true thing... Isn't that what Hemingway said in a movable feast... Fiction is an approach to truth just as fantasy is the escape from truth... To tell the truth; your crimminal doesn't have the sense to get the loot let alone hang on to it...It is not a flaw of character but of conception...
0 Replies
 
 

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