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Songs That Tell Stories NUMBER TWO

 
 
Reply Thu 28 Nov, 2002 09:08 pm
The last songs to appear in the first thread are RAMSES II IS DEAD MY LOVE and GHOST RIDERS IN THE SKY.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 3 • Views: 13,663 • Replies: 106
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Nov, 2002 09:17 pm
BE CAREFUL OF STONES THAT YOU THROW written by Bonnie Dodd

A tongue can accuse and carry bad news
The seeds of distrust it will sow
But unless you've made no mistakes in your life
Be careful of stones that you throw

A neighbor was passing my garden one time
She stopped and I knew right away
That it was gossip not flowers she had on her mind
And this is what my neighbor had to say

"That girl from down the street should be run from our midst
She drinks and she talks quite a lot
She knows not to speak to my child or to me"
My neighbor then smiled and I thought:

A tongue can accuse and carry bad news
The seeds of distrust it will sow
But unless you've made no mistakes in your life
Be careful of stones that you throw

A car speeded by and the screaming of brakes
A sound that made my blood chill
For my neighbor's one child had been pulled from the path
And saved by a girl lying still

The child was unhurt and my neighbor cried out:
"Oh who was that brave girl so sweet?"
I covered the crushed broken body and said:
"THe bad girl who lived down the street."

A tongue can accuse and carry bad news
The seeds of distrust it will sow
But unless you've made no mistakes in your life
Be careful of stones that you throw
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Nov, 2002 09:37 pm
SIMPLE TWIST OF FATE by Bob Dylan

They sat together in the park
As the evening sky grew dark
She looked at him and he felt a spark
Tingle to his bones
It was then that he felt alone
And wished that he'd gone straight
And watched out for a simple twist of fate

They walked along by the old canal
A little confused I remember well
They stopped into a strange hotel
With a neon burning bright
He felt the heat of the night
Hit him like a freight
Train moving with a simple twist of fate

A saxophone someplace far off played
As she was walking along by the arcade
As the light bust through a beat-up shade
Where he was walking up
She dropped a coin into the cup
Of a blind man at the gate
And forgot about a simple twist of fate

He woke up The room was bare
He didn't see her anywhere
He told himself he didn't care
Pushed the window open wide
Felt an emptiness inside
To which he just could not relate
Brought on by a simple twist of fate

He hears the ticking of the clocks
And walks along with a parrot that talks
Hunts her down by the waterfront docks
Where the sailors all come in
Maybe she'll pick him out again
How long must he wait
One more time for a simple twist of fate

People tell me it's a sin
To know and feel too much within
I still believe she was my twin
But I lost the ring
She was born in spring
But I was born too late
Blame it on a simple twist of fate
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Dec, 2002 07:02 pm
MY SON CALLS ANOTHER MAN DADDY

Tonight my head is bowed in sorrow
I cant keep the tears from my eyes
My son calls another man daddy
The right to his love Ive been denied

My son calls another man daddy
Hell never know my name or my face
God only knows how it hurts me
For another to be in my place

Each night I laid there in prison
I pictured a future so bright
He was my one ray of sunshine
That shone through the darkness of the night

Chorus

Today his mother shares a new love
She just couldnt stand the disgrace
My son calls another man daddy
And longs for the love he cant replace
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Dec, 2002 07:11 pm
He Never Got Enough Love ~ Lucinda Williams

His mama ran off when he was just a kid
So he never really knew her at all
Just a picture of a girl in a sad blue dress
Hanging beside a cross on the wall
His daddy used to drive those eighteen wheelers
Now he drives the bottle deep into the night
He was always saying son, you're just no good
You'll never do anything right
He never got enough love in all his life
He wasn't brought up right he never got enough love
The screams and the bruises and the broken bottles
These were things he understood
From busted chairs to a broken heart
He got away as soon as he could
When he was just eighteen he got his very own gun
Shot a kid near a liquor store one night
He was all mixed up he never understood why
He was only lookin' to prove his daddy right
He never got enough love in all his life
He wasn't brought up right he never got enough love
He never got enough love in all his life
He wasn't brought up right he never got enough love
0 Replies
 
JoanneDorel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Dec, 2002 07:50 pm
Artist Jim Croce

Song Time In A Bottle

If I could save Time in a bottle
The first thing that I'd like to do
Is to save every day
Til Eternity passes away
Just to spend them with you

If I could make days last forever
If words could make wishes come true
I'd save every day like a treasure and then,
Again, I would spend them with you

CHORUS:

But there never seems to be enough time
To do the things you want to do
Once you find them
I've looked around enough to know
That you're the one I want to go
Through time with

If I had a box just for wishes
And dreams that had never come true
The box would be empty
Except for the memory
Of how they were answered by you
0 Replies
 
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Dec, 2002 11:52 pm
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A Better Place to Be by Harry Chapin

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

It was an early morning bar room,
And the place just opened up.
And the little man come in so fast and
Started at his cup.
And the broad who served the whisky
She was a big old friendly girl.
And she tried to fight her empty nights
By smilin' at the world.

And she said "Hey Bub, It's been awhile
Since you been around.
Where the hell you been hidin' ?
And why you look so down ?"

But the little man just sat there like he'd never heard a sound.

The waitress she gave out a cough,
And acting not the least put off,
She spoke once again.

She said, "I don't want to bother you,
Consider it's understood.
I know I'm not no beauty queen,
But I sure can listen good."

And the little man took his drink in his hand
And he raised it to his lips.
He took a couple of sips.
And he told the waitress this story.

"I am the midnight watchman down at Miller's Tool and Die.
And I watch the metal rusting, and I watch the time go by.
A week ago at the diner I stopped to get a bite.
And this here lovely lady she sat two seats from my right.
And Lord, Lord, Lord she was alright.

"Oh she was so damned beautiful that she'd warm a winter's frost.
But she was long past lonely, and well nigh unto lost.
Now I'm not much of a mover, or a pick-em-up easy guy,
But I decided to glide on over, and give her one good try.
And Lord, Lord, Lord she was worth a try.

"Tongued-tied like a school boy, I stammered out some words.
But it did not really matter much, 'cause I don't think she heard.
She just looked clear on through me to a space back in my head.
And it shamed me into silence, as quietly she said,
'If you want me to come with you, then that's all right with me.
Cause I know I'm going nowhere, and anywhere's a better place to be.
Anywhere's a better place to be.'

"I drove her to my boarding house, and I took her up to my room.
And I went to turn on the only light to brighten up the gloom.
But she said, 'Please leave the light off, Oh I don't mind the dark.'
And as her clothes all tumbled 'round her, I could hear my heart.
The moonlight shown upon her as she lay back in my bed.
It was the kind of scene I only had imagined in my head.
I just could not believe it, to think that she was real.
And as I tried to tell her she said 'Shhh.. I know just how you feel.
And if you want to come here with me, then that's all right with me.
'Cause I've been oh so lonely, lovin' someone is a better way to be.
anywhere's a better way to be.'

"The morning come so swiftly but I held her in my arms.
But she slept like a baby, snug and safe from harm.
I did not want to share her with the world or break the mood,
So before she woke I went out and brought us both some food.

"I came back with my paper bag, to find out she was gone.
She'd left a six word letter saying 'It's time that I moved on.'"

The waitress took a bar rag, and she wiped it across her eyes.
And as she spoke her voice came out as something like a sigh.
She said "I wish that I was beautiful, or that you were halfway blind.
And I wish I weren't so dog-gone fat, I wish that you were mine.
And I wish that you'd come with me, when I leave for home.
For we both know all about emptiness, and livin' all alone."

And the little man,
Looked at the empty glass in his hand.
And he smiled a crooked grin,
He said, " I guess I'm out of gin.
And know we both have been so lonely.
And if you want me to come with you, then that's all right with me.
'Cause I know I'm goin' nowhere and anywhere's a better place to be."
0 Replies
 
BillW
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Dec, 2002 12:02 am
Gilligan's Island Theme Song

Just sit right back and you'll hear a tale,
A tale of a fateful trip
That started from this tropic port,
Aboard this tiny Ship.
The mate was a mighty sailin' man,
The Skipper brave and sure,
Five passengers set sail that day
For a three hour tour.

A three hour tour. [ sound of thunder: crack! ]

The weather started getting rough,
The tiny ship was tossed.
If not for the courage of the fearless crew,
The Minnow would be lost.

The Minnow would be lost.

The ship's aground on the shore of this
Uncharted desert isle
With Gilligan, the Skipper too,
The Millionaire and his wife,
A movie star, the Professor and Mary Ann,
All Here on Gilligan's Isle!

So this is the tale of our castways,
They're here for a long, long time
They'll have to make the best of things,
It's an uphill climb.

The first mate and his Skipper too,
Will do their very best,
To make the others comfortable,
In their tropic island nest.

No phones! No lights! No motor cars!
Not a single luxury,
Like Robinson C-ru-soe, it's primitive as can be.
So join us here each week my freinds,
You're sure to get a smile,
From seven stranded castways,
Here on "Gilligan's Isle."
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Dec, 2002 05:59 am
Always like that one, Bill. Almost as much as the BALLAD OF JED CLAMPETT.
0 Replies
 
JoanneDorel
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Dec, 2002 08:40 am
WHERE'S MY APPLE PIE?
(Words and Music by Joan Baez)

Been sitting on old park benches
Brother, hasn't it been fun?
But you remember me from the trenches
I fought in World War One
Yes, you saw us off at the troop train
Smiling a brave goodbye
But where were you when we came home
To claim our apple pie

Oh where's our apple pie, my friends?
Where's our apple pie?
We've walked and wheeled from the battlefield
Now where's our apple pie?

World War Two was a favorite
God was surely on our side
The teenage kids enlisted with
The blessings of their daddys' pride
Well the wars may change but not so the glaze
In the young boys' eyes
When they cry out for their mamas
In the hours before they die

Oh where's our apple pie, my friends?
Where's our apple pie?
We've walked and wheeled from the battlefield
Now where's our apple pie?

I volunteered for the last one
And I don't want to moralize
But somehow I thought we deserved the best
For the way we threw away our lives
For we all believed in something
I know it wasn't very clear
But I know it wasn't rats in a hospital room
And a broken-down wheelchair

Oh where's our apple pie, my friends?
Where's our apple pie?
We've walked and wheeled from the battlefield
Now where's our apple pie?

Yes, Johnny finally got his gun
Before he got his apple pie
Now he hasn't got a hand to eat it with
But still he doesn't want to die
Because he prefers to go on fighting
And let his baby brother know
When the next time around the call goes out
It's "Hell no, we won't go!"

There'll be no World War Three, my friends
There'll be no World War Three
We've walked and wheeled from the battlefield
There'll be no World War Three
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Dec, 2002 09:48 pm
Most of us know Marty Robbins' song "El Paso". Less well known is another song, to the same tune, he recorded later telling the story of Feelena, the Mexican girl for whose love the cowboy lost his life.

Out in New Mexico, many long years ago
There in a shack on the desert, one night in a storm
Amid streaks of lightnin' and loud desert thunder
To a young Mexican couple, a baby was born;
Just as the baby cried, thunder and lightnin' died
Moon gave it's light to the world and the stars did the same
Mother and Father, both proud of the daughter
That heaven had sent them, Feleena was this baby's [D] name.

When she was seventeen, bothered by crazy dreams
She ran away from the shack and left them to roam
Father and Mother, both asked one another
What made her run away, what made Feleena leave home;
Tired of the desert nights, fartherly grieved to strife
She ran away late one night in the moon's golden gleam
She didn't know where she'd go, but she'd get there
And she would find happiness, if she would follow her dream.

After she ran away, she went to Sante Fe
And in the year that she stayed there, she learned about life
In just a little while, she learned that with a smile
She could have pretty clothes, she could be any man's wife;
Rich men romanced her, they dined and they danced her
She understood men and she treated them all just the same
A form that was fine and rare, dark shining glossy hair
Lovely to look at Feleena was this woman's name.

Restless in Sante Fe, she had to get away
To any town where the lights had a much brighter glow
One cowboy mentioned the town of El Paso
They never stopped dancin' and money like whiskey did flow;
She bought a one-way, a ticket from Sante Fe
Three days and nights on a stage with a rest now and then
She didn't mind that, she knew she would find that
Her new life would be more exciting than where she had been.

The stage made it's last stop, up there on the mountain top
To let her see all of the lights at the foot of the hill
Her world was brighter and deep down inside her
An uncontrolled beating, her young heart just wouldn't be still;
She got a hotel, a room at the Lily Belle
Quickly she changed to a form-fitting black satin dress
Ev'ry man stopped to stare, at this form fine and rare
Even the women remarked of the charm she possessed.

Dancin' and laughter, was what she was after
And Rosa's Cantina had lights, with love in the gleam
That's what she hunted and that's what she wanted
Rosa's was one place, a nice girl would never be seen;
It was the same way, it was back in Sante Fe
Men would make fools of themselves at the thought of romance
Rosa took heed of, the place was in need of
This kind of excitement, so she paid Feleena to dance.

A year passed and maybe more and then through the swingin' doors
Came a young cowboy so tall and so handsomely dressed
This one was new in town, hadn't been seen around
He was so different, he wasn't like all of the rest;
Feleena danced close to him, then threw a rose to him
Quickly he walked to her table and there he sat down
And in a day or so, wherever folks would go
They'd see this young cowboy, showin' Feelena the town.

Six weeks he went with her, each minute spent with her
But he was insanely jealous of glances she'd give
Inside he was a-hurtin', from all of her flirtin'
That was her nature and that was the way that she lived;
She flirted one night, it started a gun-fight
And after the smoke cleared away, on the floor lay a man
Feleena's young lover, had shot down another
And he had to leave there, so out through the back door he ran.

The next day at five o'clock, she heard a rifle shot
Quickly she ran to the door, that was facin' the pass
She saw her cowboy, her wild-ridin' cowboy
Low in the saddle, her cowboy was ridin' in fast;
She ran to meet him, to kiss and to greet him
He saw her and motioned her back, with a wave of his hand
Bullets were flyin', Feleena was cryin'
As she saw him fall from the saddle and into the sand.

Feleena knelt near him, to hold and to hear him
When she felt the warm blood that flowed from the wound in his side
He raised to kiss her and she heard him whisper
"Never forget me - Faleena it's over, goodbye."
Quickly she grabbed for, the six-gun that he wore
And screamin' in anger and placin' the gun to her breast
Bury us both deep and maybe we'll find peace
And pullin' the trigger, she fell 'cross the dead cowboy's chest.

Out in El Paso, whenever the wind blows
If you listen closely at night, you'll hear in the wind
A woman is cryin', it's not the wind sighin'
Old timer's tell you, Feleena is callin' for him;
You'll hear them talkin' and you'll hear them walkin'
You'll hear them laugh and you'll look, but there's no one around
Don't be alarmed - there is really no harm there
It's only the young cowboy, showin' Feleena the town.

Note. The Drifter, Marty Robbins
Columbia Records CS-9327
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Dec, 2002 09:54 pm
Thanks, George. I have most of Marty's albums (on vinyl). Nobody could match his old west songs. Don't forget the other song, EL PASO CITY, I think it's called. I don't recall the words well enough to post it here.
0 Replies
 
JoanneDorel
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Dec, 2002 10:23 pm
Edgar and George I had the flu so bad when these two were in the top 40 I thought I would die from hearing them so often rather than the flu. Remember when there was not FM and songs only lasted a minute or two? And they played the top 10 every hour.
0 Replies
 
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Dec, 2002 03:30 am
Romeo's Heart-John Farnham

There's no hero in this story
And the ending is so sad
In the ruins of my dreams we lie
I would kill to win you back

I should send you fields of roses
Say I'll always wish you well
But I had cast you as my Juliet
And you have cast me into hell

For those who have been wounded
Where love has missed it's mark
Bow your head and say a prayer
Tonight for Romeo's Heart

In this wine I taste your kisses
With this bread I break my word
I will not die upon this cross for you
All I feel for you is hurt

I know the moon will rise again
But there will be no starlight in my eyes

For those who have been wounded
Where love has missed it's mark
Bow your head and say a prayer
Tonight for Romeo's Heart
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Dec, 2002 07:59 am
Thanks Edgar. I do like these music threads and have enjowed your posts.

On another thread you cited fragments of two songs I remember only partly, but liked very much.

The first was "Freight train"

Feright train, freight train go'in so fast
Freigh train, freight train go'in so fast
I don't know what train he's on
Won't you tell me where he's gone

The version I recall was sung by a woman, but I don't recall her name - very wistful.


The second was "I'm Movi'n On" sung by Hank Snow.

I can't recall the whole lyric but here's some more of it,

That big eight wheeler rollin' down the track
says your true lovi'n daddy ain't coming back
'cause I'm movin' on. I'll soon be gone.
I warned you twice, now you can settle the price
'cause I'm movin' on

That big loud whislle as it blew and blew
says hello to the southland, I'm coming to you
'cause I'm movin' on, I'm movin' on.
I'm through with you too bad you're blue
I'll just keep movin' on

You switched your engine, now I ain't got time
for a trife'lin woman on my main line
'cause I'm movin' on. You done your daddy wrong.
I'm through with you too bad you're blue
I'll just keep movin' on

Now someday baby when you've had your play
You're go'nna want your daddy but your daddy will say
Keep movi'n on, keep movi'n on
I'm through with you, too bad your blue
Just keep movin' on.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Dec, 2002 07:45 pm
Oxford town Oxford town
Everybody's got their heads bowed down
Sun don't shine above the ground
Hey we're going down to Oxford town
He went down to Oxford town
Guns and clubs followed him down
All because his face was brown
Better get away from Oxford town
Oxford town around the bend
Come to the door he couldn't get in
All because of the color of his skin
What do you think about that my friend
Me and my gal, my gal, son
We got met with a tear gas bomb
Don't even know why we come
Goin back where we come from
Oxford town in the afternoon
Everybody's singing a sorrowful tune
Two men died neath the Mississippi moon
Somebody better investigate soon
0 Replies
 
Booman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Dec, 2002 08:24 pm
before I put my favorite, I want to say lovers of R&B, when they think of the Coasters, probably immediatly think,humor , novelty. But they may have been the most prolific storytellers of my time. Of course the bulk of their writing was done by Lieber and Strobe, I believe. Okay here goes my favorite.
.............."Livin' for the City"-Stevie Wonder

A boy is born, in Hardtimes Mississippi,
Surrounded by, four walls that ain't so pretty'

(sigh) Sad I must begetting old, I've done this song on stage, and now I'm putting lines in the wrong place. But hey it's a great story!
0 Replies
 
Lash Goth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Dec, 2002 09:46 pm
Angel From Montgomery by John Prine

I am an old woman
Named after my mother
My old man is another
Child that's grown old

If dreams were thunder
And lightnin' was desire
This old house would have burnt down
A long time ago

Make me an angel, that flies from Montgomery
Make me a poster, of an old rodeo
Just give me one thing, Lord , that I can hold onto
To believe in this living is just a hard way to go

When I was a young girl
I had me a cowboy
He wasn't much to look at
Just a free ramblin' man

Oh, but that was such a long time
And no matter how I try
Those years they just flow by
Like a broken-down dam

Make me an angel, that flies from Montgomery
Make me a poster, of an old rodeo
Just give me one thing, I can hold onto
To believe in this living is just a hard way to go

There's flies in the kitchen
I can hear all their buzzin'
But I ain't done nothin
Since I woke up today

How the hell can a person
Go to work in the morning
And come home in the evening
And have nothin' to say?

Make me an angel, that flies from Montgomery
Make me a poster of an old rodeo
Just give me one thing I can hold onto
To believe in this living is just a hard way to go
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Dec, 2002 09:54 pm
Booman
I love the Coasters. My favorites are Searchin and Young Blood, but they had many greats. Do you recall when as the Robins they sang Smokey Joe's Cafe?
0 Replies
 
Lash Goth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Dec, 2002 10:50 pm
A very important story about war.

ALICE'S RESTAURANT BY ARLO GUTHRIE

This song is called Alice's Restaurant, and it's about Alice, and the
restaurant, but Alice's Restaurant is not the name of the restaurant,
that's just the name of the song, and that's why I called the song Alice's
Restaurant.

You can get anything you want at Alice's Restaurant
You can get anything you want at Alice's Restaurant
Walk right in it's around the back
Just a half a mile from the railroad track
You can get anything you want at Alice's Restaurant

Now it all started two Thanksgivings ago, was on - two years ago on
Thanksgiving, when my friend and I went up to visit Alice at the
restaurant, but Alice doesn't live in the restaurant, she lives in the
church nearby the restaurant, in the bell-tower, with her husband Ray and
Fasha the dog. And livin' in the bell tower like that, they got a lot of
room downstairs where the pews used to be in. Havin' all that room,
seein' as how they took out all the pews, they decided that they didn't
have to take out their garbage for a long time.

We got up there, we found all the garbage in there, and we decided it'd be
a friendly gesture for us to take the garbage down to the city dump. So
we took the half a ton of garbage, put it in the back of a red VW
microbus, took shovels and rakes and implements of destruction and headed
on toward the city dump.

Well we got there and there was a big sign and a chain across across the
dump saying, "Closed on Thanksgiving." And we had never heard of a dump
closed on Thanksgiving before, and with tears in our eyes we drove off
into the sunset looking for another place to put the garbage.

We didn't find one. Until we came to a side road, and off the side of the
side road there was another fifteen foot cliff and at the bottom of the
cliff there was another pile of garbage. And we decided that one big pile
is better than two little piles, and rather than bring that one up we
decided to throw our's down.

That's what we did, and drove back to the church, had a thanksgiving
dinner that couldn't be beat, went to sleep and didn't get up until the
next morning, when we got a phone call from officer Obie. He said, "Kid,
we found your name on an envelope at the bottom of a half a ton of
garbage, and just wanted to know if you had any information about it." And
I said, "Yes, sir, Officer Obie, I cannot tell a lie, I put that envelope
under that garbage."

After speaking to Obie for about fourty-five minutes on the telephone we
finally arrived at the truth of the matter and said that we had to go down
and pick up the garbage, and also had to go down and speak to him at the
police officer's station. So we got in the red VW microbus with the
shovels and rakes and implements of destruction and headed on toward the
police officer's station.

Now friends, there was only one or two things that Obie coulda done at
the police station, and the first was he could have given us a medal for
being so brave and honest on the telephone, which wasn't very likely, and
we didn't expect it, and the other thing was he could have bawled us out
and told us never to be see driving garbage around the vicinity again,
which is what we expected, but when we got to the police officer's station
there was a third possibility that we hadn't even counted upon, and we was
both immediately arrested. Handcuffed. And I said "Obie, I don't think I
can pick up the garbage with these handcuffs on." He said, "Shut up, kid.
Get in the back of the patrol car."

And that's what we did, sat in the back of the patrol car and drove to the
quote Scene of the Crime unquote. I want tell you about the town of
Stockbridge, Massachusets, where this happened here, they got three stop
signs, two police officers, and one police car, but when we got to the
Scene of the Crime there was five police officers and three police cars,
being the biggest crime of the last fifty years, and everybody wanted to
get in the newspaper story about it. And they was using up all kinds of
cop equipment that they had hanging around the police officer's station.
They was taking plaster tire tracks, foot prints, dog smelling prints, and
they took twenty seven eight-by-ten colour glossy photographs with circles
and arrows and a paragraph on the back of each one explaining what each
one was to be used as evidence against us. Took pictures of the approach,
the getaway, the northwest corner the southwest corner and that's not to
mention the aerial photography.

After the ordeal, we went back to the jail. Obie said he was going to put
us in the cell. Said, "Kid, I'm going to put you in the cell, I want your
wallet and your belt." And I said, "Obie, I can understand you wanting my
wallet so I don't have any money to spend in the cell, but what do you
want my belt for?" And he said, "Kid, we don't want any hangings." I
said, "Obie, did you think I was going to hang myself for littering?"
Obie said he was making sure, and friends Obie was, cause he took out the
toilet seat so I couldn't hit myself over the head and drown, and he took
out the toilet paper so I couldn't bend the bars roll out the - roll the
toilet paper out the window, slide down the roll and have an escape. Obie
was making sure, and it was about four or five hours later that Alice
(remember Alice? It's a song about Alice), Alice came by and with a few
nasty words to Obie on the side, bailed us out of jail, and we went back
to the church, had a another thanksgiving dinner that couldn't be beat,
and didn't get up until the next morning, when we all had to go to court.

We walked in, sat down, Obie came in with the twenty seven eight-by-ten
colour glossy pictures with circles and arrows and a paragraph on the back
of each one, sat down. Man came in said, "All rise." We all stood up,
and Obie stood up with the twenty seven eight-by-ten colour glossy
pictures, and the judge walked in sat down with a seeing eye dog, and he
sat down, we sat down. Obie looked at the seeing eye dog, and then at the
twenty seven eight-by-ten colour glossy pictures with circles and arrows
and a paragraph on the back of each one, and looked at the seeing eye dog.
And then at twenty seven eight-by-ten colour glossy pictures with circles
and arrows and a paragraph on the back of each one and began to cry,
'cause Obie came to the realization that it was a typical case of American
blind justice, and there wasn't nothing he could do about it, and the
judge wasn't going to look at the twenty seven eight-by-ten colour glossy
pictures with the circles and arrows and a paragraph on the back of each
one explaining what each one was to be used as evidence against us. And
we was fined $50 and had to pick up the garbage in the snow, but thats not
what I came to tell you about.

Came to talk about the draft.

They got a building down New York City, it's called Whitehall Street,
where you walk in, you get injected, inspected, detected, infected,
neglected and selected. I went down to get my physical examination one
day, and I walked in, I sat down, got good and drunk the night before, so
I looked and felt my best when I went in that morning. `Cause I wanted to
look like the all-American kid from New York City, man I wanted, I wanted
to feel like the all-, I wanted to be the all American kid from New York,
and I walked in, sat down, I was hung down, brung down, hung up, and all
kinds o' mean nasty ugly things. And I waked in and sat down and they gave
me a piece of paper, said, "Kid, see the phsychiatrist, room 604."

And I went up there, I said, "Shrink, I want to kill. I mean, I wanna, I
wanna kill. Kill. I wanna, I wanna see, I wanna see blood and gore and
guts and veins in my teeth. Eat dead burnt bodies. I mean kill, Kill,
KILL, KILL." And I started jumpin up and down yelling, "KILL, KILL," and
he started jumpin up and down with me and we was both jumping up and down
yelling, "KILL, KILL." And the sargent came over, pinned a medal on me,
sent me down the hall, said, "You're our boy."

Didn't feel too good about it.

Proceeded on down the hall gettin more injections, inspections,
detections, neglections and all kinds of stuff that they was doin' to me
at the thing there, and I was there for two hours, three hours, four
hours, I was there for a long time going through all kinds of mean nasty
ugly things and I was just having a tough time there, and they was
inspecting, injecting every single part of me, and they was leaving no
part untouched. Proceeded through, and when I finally came to the see the
last man, I walked in, walked in sat down after a whole big thing there,
and I walked up and said, "What do you want?" He said, "Kid, we only got
one question. Have you ever been arrested?"

And I proceeded to tell him the story of the Alice's Restaurant Massacre,
with full orchestration and five part harmony and stuff like that and all
the phenome... - and he stopped me right there and said, "Kid, did you ever
go to court?"

And I proceeded to tell him the story of the twenty seven eight-by-ten
colour glossy pictures with the circles and arrows and the paragraph on
the back of each one, and he stopped me right there and said, "Kid, I want
you to go and sit down on that bench that says Group W .... NOW kid!!"

And I, I walked over to the, to the bench there, and there is, Group W's
where they put you if you may not be moral enough to join the army after
committing your special crime, and there was all kinds of mean nasty ugly
looking people on the bench there. Mother rapers. Father stabbers. Father
rape
rs! Father rapers sitting right there on the bench next to me! And
they was mean and nasty and ugly and horrible crime-type guys sitting on the
bench next to me. And the meanest, ugliest, nastiest one, the meanest
father raper of them all, was coming over to me and he was mean 'n' ugly
'n' nasty 'n' horrible and all kind of things and he sat down next to me
and said, "Kid, whad'ya get?" I said, "I didn't get nothing, I had to pay
$50 and pick up the garbage." He said, "What were you arrested for, kid?"
And I said, "Littering." And they all moved away from me on the bench
there, and the hairy eyeball and all kinds of mean nasty things, till I
said, "And creating a nuisance." And they all came back, shook my hand,
and we had a great time on the bench, talkin about crime, mother stabbing,
father raping, all kinds of groovy things that we was talking about on the
bench. And everything was fine, we was smoking cigarettes and all kinds of
things, until the Sargeant came over, had some paper in his hand, held it
up and said.

"Kids, this-piece-of-paper's-got-47-words-37-sentences-58-words-we-wanna-
know-details-of-the-crime-time-of-the-crime-and-any-other-kind-of-thing-
you-gotta-say-pertaining-to-and-about-the-crime-I-want-to-know-arresting-
officer's-name-and-any-other-kind-of-thing-you-gotta-say", and talked for
forty-five minutes and nobody understood a word that he said, but we had
fun filling out the forms and playing with the pencils on the bench there,
and I filled out the massacre with the four part harmony, and wrote it
down there, just like it was, and everything was fine and I put down the
pencil, and I turned over the piece of paper, and there, there on the
other side, in the middle of the other side, away from everything else on
the other side, in parentheses, capital letters, quotated, read the
following words:

("KID, HAVE YOU REHABILITATED YOURSELF?")

I went over to the sargent, said, "Sargeant, you got a lot a damn gall to
ask me if I've rehabilitated myself, I mean, I mean, I mean that just, I'm
sittin' here on the bench, I mean I'm sittin here on the Group W bench
'cause you want to know if I'm moral enough join the army, burn women,
kids, houses and villages after bein' a litterbug." He looked at me and
said, "Kid, we don't like your kind, and we're gonna send you fingerprints
off to Washington."

And friends, somewhere in Washington enshrined in some little folder, is a
study in black and white of my fingerprints. And the only reason I'm
singing you this song now is cause you may know somebody in a similar
situation, or you may be in a similar situation, and if your in a
situation like that there's only one thing you can do and that's walk into
the shrink wherever you are ,just walk in say "Shrink, You can get
anything you want, at Alice's restaurant.". And walk out. You know, if
one person, just one person does it they may think he's really sick and
they won't take him. And if two people, two people do it, in harmony,
they may think they're both faggots and they won't take either of them.
And three people do it, three, can you imagine, three people walking in
singin a bar of Alice's Restaurant and walking out. They may think it's an
organization. And can you, can you imagine fifty people a day,I said
fifty people a day walking in singin a bar of Alice's Restaurant and
walking out. And friends they may thinks it's a movement.

And that's what it is , the Alice's Restaurant Anti-Massacre Movement, and
all you got to do to join is sing it the next time it come's around on the
guitar.

With feeling. So we'll wait for it to come around on the guitar, here and
sing it when it does. Here it comes.

You can get anything you want, at Alice's Restaurant
You can get anything you want, at Alice's Restaurant
Walk right in it's around the back
Just a half a mile from the railroad track
You can get anything you want, at Alice's Restaurant

That was horrible. If you want to end war and stuff you got to sing loud.
I've been singing this song now for twenty five minutes. I could sing it
for another twenty five minutes. I'm not proud... or tired.

So we'll wait till it comes around again, and this time with four part
harmony and feeling.

We're just waitin' for it to come around is what we're doing.

All right now.

You can get anything you want, at Alice's Restaurant
Excepting Alice
You can get anything you want, at Alice's Restaurant
Walk right in it's around the back
Just a half a mile from the railroad track
You can get anything you want, at Alice's Restaurant

Da da da da da da da dum
At Alice's Restaurant

OK, IT'S NOT ABOUT WAR OR A RESTAURANT, BUT IT'S STILL VERY IMPORTANT!




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