0
   

Buddhism: a religion or a philosophy?

 
 
Reply Mon 2 Oct, 2006 05:11 am
Orginally conceived as an antidote to Religion in terms of any reliance upon a God, faith or Theology, to use reason rather than documents, Buddhism is none the less classed as a religion, ordinarily.

My own disposition is to occassionally own up to being a "Quasi Buddhist", sympathetic to the original philosophy but definitely not to the hypocrisy, the established trappings of the institution.

For me "Buddhism" implies above all else a personality description because in practice that is what turns out to be, attractive to a particular type of thoughtful introvert, but not so attractive to a belligerent extrovert.

--- RH.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 2,248 • Replies: 13
No top replies

 
pilgrimshost
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Oct, 2006 04:53 pm
@perplexity,
Would you say that Buddhism is a 'way' in life, kind of what born-again christians would say about their faith, these christians would also say it isnt a religion on this basis. Hypocracy is rife, though it shouldnt reflect on its principals. The question is what is the criteria for it to be a religion, in that case is it just what you follow in life as your purpose or devotion, which could be anything-thus god really could be a dj!
perplexity
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Oct, 2006 06:02 pm
@pilgrimshost,
pilgrimshost wrote:
Would you say that Buddhism is a 'way' in life, kind of what born-again christians would say about their faith, these christians would also say it isnt a religion on this basis.


What is commonly known as "The Way" is a central theme of Buddhism, but hardly akin to the evangelism of a head strong Christian.

pilgrimshost wrote:
Hypocracy is rife, though it shouldnt reflect on its principals.


The trouble with that is that the principle is supposed to be that action is the principle.

pilgrimshost wrote:

The question is what is the criteria for it to be a religion, in that case is it just what you follow in life as your purpose or devotion, which could be anything-thus god really could be a dj!


One has to go with the normal usage of Buddhism as a "religion", but as a bone of contention I would rather it be known as a philosophy. That to me is the more accurate description, if only because Buddhism was originally conceived as a practical alternative to praying to an apparently deaf God to relieve the suffering.

-- RH.
pilgrimshost
 
  2  
Reply Sun 8 Oct, 2006 06:18 pm
@perplexity,
'They' did a experiment in the US and researched the effects of prayer on hospital paticiants and supprisingly they faired better than the stooges. Is it possible that jesus's teachings and buddhas' have simularities, in the respect that they may have both craked some sort of spiritual secret which can be incorperated with humans or something?
perplexity
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Oct, 2006 06:35 pm
@pilgrimshost,
pilgrimshost wrote:
'They' did a experiment in the US and researched the effects of prayer on hospital paticiants and supprisingly they faired better than the stooges. Is it possible that jesus's teachings and buddhas' have simularities, in the respect that they may have both craked some sort of spiritual secret which can be incorperated with humans or something?


Practical experiment has also confirmed that meditation physically affects the brain, a hard and fast example indeed of the fact that the mind creates.

I have seen speculation to the effect that Jesus acquired much of his individual version of wisdom from a visit to a Buddhist culture.

--- RH.
pilgrimshost
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Oct, 2006 06:41 pm
@perplexity,
Intreging as it may be, they also say theres evidence for him to have visitd kashmir and it is also (with some supposed evidence) that his tomb is there also!
0 Replies
 
perplexity
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Oct, 2006 06:49 pm
@perplexity,
There are all sorts of stories.

One of them is How Jesus Came to Japan

and guess what:

Tomb of Jesus in Japan

--- RH.
pilgrimshost
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Oct, 2006 06:54 pm
@perplexity,
Crazy, but ive heard stranger, like the egyptions had trade routes to australia (archeological evidence does exist) so then it would seem possible, but is it?
perplexity
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Oct, 2006 07:10 pm
@pilgrimshost,
pilgrimshost wrote:
(archeological evidence does exist) so then it would seem possible, but is it?


The problem then is that It is logically impossible to know the past.

--- RH
pilgrimshost
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Oct, 2006 07:48 pm
@perplexity,
That is so true, I read the link on japan,amazing. But try telling born -againers that!
0 Replies
 
ninja pirate
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Jun, 2007 07:12 pm
@pilgrimshost,
pilgrimshost wrote:
'They' did a experiment in the US and researched the effects of prayer on hospital paticiants and supprisingly they faired better than the stooges. Is it possible that jesus's teachings and buddhas' have simularities, in the respect that they may have both craked some sort of spiritual secret which can be incorperated with humans or something?



I'm not sure that Jesus and Gotama had so much in common. Jesus was all about redemption of the soul and whatnot, while the Buddha preached the doctrine of non-self, that is, the absence of a self or soul. The general teachings of Christianity and Buddhism are incompatible. Christianity: repent to save your soul; Buddhism: reject the idea of a self to escape samsara (wheel of rebirth). Buddhism has always stricken me as a rather cynical religion, given that their intent is basically to die and stay dead. Though, I shouldn't make the mistake of calling them annihilationists, provided that they do not believe there is any 'self' being annihilated. I believe the focus of Buddhism rests on the remainder of one's life after becoming enlightened. I mean, what would life be like without existential suffering?
boagie
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Jun, 2007 07:19 am
@ninja pirate,
Originally Posted by pilgrimshost http://www.philosophyforum.com/forum/images/buttons/viewpost.gif
'They' did a experiment in the US and researched the effects of prayer on hospital paticiants and supprisingly they faired better than the stooges. Is it possible that jesus's teachings and buddhas' have simularities, in the respect that they may have both craked some sort of spiritual secret which can be incorperated with humans or something.

This is no doubt a fraud,at the very least selective information,please post said scientific findings of miracle/s.Please qualify this above statement---a poll taken of believers?:p pssssssst,I have a spiritual secret for you.
pmd
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Jun, 2007 08:53 am
@boagie,
Jesus in Japan wrote:
666 x 666 x 666 x 666 x 666 x 666 x 666 = 6667 = 58,119,196,856,185,328,256
and
58 + 119 + 196 + 856 + 185 + 328 + 256 = 1998


Tomb of Jesus in Japan wrote:
Indeed, when we disregard myths, religions, fanatical doctrines, biased interpretations, emotions etc, and concentrate on facts, we have to accept the fact that Christ died on the cross and came back to life after nearly 3 days. No one disputes that - there were many witnesses at the time. But to die and come back after 3 days is only possible if the consciousness continues to exist unharmed when the physical body is fully dead. Hence, by dying and consciously coming back to life Christ has demonstrated the immortality of consciousness. He tried to inspire people to review their materialistic attitude. His message hasn't lost any of its relevance today.


perplexity wrote:
The problem then is that It is logically impossible to know the past .
This, it would seem, merely offers revisionist historians exactly what they want: a chance to claim their versions of history are at least as valid as the accepted mainstream version of history. While I would agree that it is logically impossible to know the past in the absolute philosophical sense of knowing, I do not think this means we should open up speculation and treat those speculations as equal to evidence.

Now, I admit to drawing out the two quotes that I considered the most absurd from those two articles. The first, because numerology is absolutely hysterical. The second, because it is certainly more theology than philosophy, especially since it refers to an orthodox Christian understanding of the Gospels as an "unbiased account," and particularly one that is devoid of "mythology."

Having read both articles, I find them less "amazing" than "contrived." Numerology aside, both rely on evidence acquired in post-Christian Japan (meaning that local Shinto beliefs already had time to mingle with Christian beliefs). The adding of the Japanese currency denominations and apocalyptic undertones to both articles reminds me of a series of "THE APOCALYPSE IS COMING: The TRUE Meaning of Revelation"-style pamphlets from the '80s, which using similar evidences, attempted to draw up the scheme for the end of the world while refraining to give the actual date and time. Usually, the Soviet Union was one Beast and NATO was the other. It was trippy stuff and makes for good novels.

Now, as for Buddhism. There are two ways to define religion. One, from my old philosophy of religion professor, was the belief in an Ultimate Reality, be it God, the Tao, Brahma, or whatever. Perhaps some debate on this could be offered as to whether Buddhism believes in an Ultimate Reality. I would think it does. The second definition I offer is that a religion is essentially similar to metaphysics: it is a rational enquiry into the underlying and fundamental nature of reality, however, religion includes the authority of the past along with reason, and usually treats it as superior to reason. Buddhism does fall into this second category.
0 Replies
 
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2011 04:49 pm
@perplexity,
If we think of "religion" in the sense of re-ligare (to re-connect, as with a ligament), then buddhism is a religion but most other so-called religions are not; they're just mythologies taken too seriously.
With buddhism--at least the meditative kind--we do not connect with the ground of our being, we realize our selfless nature, that we were never separate from the ground. We suffer because of the illusion of egoness.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » Buddhism: a religion or a philosophy?
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 11/28/2021 at 03:53:04