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KFC Pulls "Racist" Australian TV spot

 
 
shewolfnm
 
  3  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:07 am
@dlowan,
dlowan wrote:

Well, I think PC is often just forcing folk to think a bit,


I read your entire post.. but.. i wanted to pull that statement and use it out of context just a bit..

What is happening is that people are not thinking. They are constantly black listing thousands of things in order to make our society appear 'normal' and to shoo racism under the carpet like a dirty little secret.

Small sayings like" sit indian style" are now black listed terms and something a family COULD sue a school teacher for saying.
To sit indian style is -
http://epcdn.net/ups/d88/2260851839.jpg
It is a simple description of how to sit and it came about from photos of Eastern Indian and American Indian's posture and positions.

but. saying that now? Is racist and supposedly ignorant.

These little things are popping up everywhere as if everyone is looking for an excuse to yell the racism card. ( People are going to kill me for saying that. So what)

The problem is that everyone can take offense to almost everything if they look hard enough. This new PC rule is enforcing the thought process and behaviours that feed into that racist mentality. LOOK for something to be offended about! thats how you behave in this society. And no one sees how badly we are shooting ourselves in the foot with this mentality.

</rant>
dadpad
 
  2  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:08 am
sorry shewolf you cant make that advert.
crickets are black.
dadpad
 
  2  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:12 am
@dadpad,
....except for mole crickets and them cave crickets they aint black but they're blind so ya cant use them cause they disabled.
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  2  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:12 am
@Eorl,
I think pulling the ad is a calculated move. Outrage over an ad is a flash-in-the-pan. Pulling the ad makes more of a splash. (If I may mix my metaphors...)
shewolfnm
 
  2  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:16 am
@ebrown p,
ebrown p wrote:


look at what happened...

1. An American company (whose sole purpose is to make money selling food) makes an ad.
2. Some people (apparently in the US) take offense at the ad and say so publicly.
3. The company pulls the ad.

Why is any part of this process wrong?


Its not.
In fact reacting that way makes sense.... But, Australia isnt america..


ebrown p wrote:

Profit making companies are supposed to respond to their audience. Why wouldn't they pull an ad that many of their customers found offensive? Their job is not to stand firm against social change... their goal is to make their customers happy.


But, this ad is not meant for America.
This ad is meant for australia

so why is it that what one society deems inappropriate can dictate what another country sees?
I understand your point. I really do.

But isnt this imposing someone elses morals, values and ethics onto someone else? the someones in this case being societies..
Why should Australia now have to be subjected to censorship that is acceptable in another country but not their own? Why should they be required to think like the US and shun that commercial?



shewolfnm
 
  2  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:20 am
@DrewDad,
aiiiyyee....

Bingo. we have a winner.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:21 am
@ebrown p,
i understand why the noose is a powerful symbol, and it should have been the headline worthy story it was, but the punching incident was a race related story and none of the major voices of the black community (sharpton and jackson) had anything to say about it, if the roles had been reversed and a white male professor had punched a black coworker, they'd have been all over it

racism can and does work both ways, you either acknowledge it all or we find some way to just get over it all

0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  2  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:25 am
@Diest TKO,
Diest TKO wrote:
I remember last year seeing a series of KFC ads that seemed to have only Asian people in them. I was confused, but then I remembered how much I love fried chickens!

Isn't KFC huge in Japan, especially around Christmas?

http://www.travelblog.org/Asia/Japan/Hiroshima/Hiroshima/blog-230261.html

Quote:
So that's Christmas for another year. Although, in Japan, 'Christmas' was very unlike the Christmas back home. My host sister went to school to study (yes, school, on Christmas day), my host parents were working. I was like, what a bunch of Grinches! But fair enough, Christmas just isn't a big deal here. They do have some Christmas customs though - apparently eating KFC is one of these. On Christmas Eve, we drove past a KFC takeout place, and there was a line so long that it went out of the shop and all the way onto the street. So I wasn't completely surprised when, for tea tonight, there was a familiar looking red and white box containing pieces of 'original recipe' chicken on the table. Merry Christmas, indeed.

After tea we had a very beautifully decorated German Christmas cake, which, before eating, we all said 'itadakimasu!' Talk about a multi-cultural Christmas - American takeout, German cake, and Japanese set phrases. Weird...
dadpad
 
  4  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:26 am
@shewolfnm,
dont forget chicken meat is white and chicken is another word for coward so... logically black crickets eating white chicken meat is justa metaphor for black supremacy.

even black chickens are white inside.
0 Replies
 
ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:28 am
@shewolfnm,
Shewolf...

Do you really want to stop people from talking about racism?

Look, as long as we are talking about racism in society and race issues there are going to be things we disagree on. There will be things that you think are racist, and there will be things that I think are racist.

So let's talk.

Fine, you and I agree that banning the term "sitting indian style" is silly-- although there was a teacher in a community that found this term upsetting, it would be professionally irresponsible for her to use it (but that is another story).

But what about the term "Queer"? This word originally meant "odd" or "unnatural" and began to be used for homosexual. A word with negative connotations being used to refer to a group of human beings is particularly offensive.

In the seventies and eighties the word "Queer" has basically be drummed out of common use. As a kid I remember playing "Smear the queer" a phrase that my kids don't even know.

Was getting rid of terms like "queer" and "colored" a bad thing?

Discussing these things is part of an inclusive society. Each group in society should have a voice, and some of them will have opinions that you don't agree with... but that's life.

As far as banning words... I am a free speech zealot. Anyone has the right to say whatever they want. But, of course, I have just as much of a right to criticize them. By having these discussions society evolves an understanding of what offensive or not (and these standards are always changing). Of course, in professional situations... and particularly in the classroom... people need to be especially sensitive.

It seems to me that you are trying to shut them up (not the other way round).
ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:31 am
@shewolfnm,
Quote:


But isnt this imposing someone elses morals, values and ethics onto someone else? the someones in this case being societies..
Why should Australia now have to be subjected to censorship that is acceptable in another country but not their own? Why should they be required to think like the US and shun that commercial?


1. KFC is an American company.

2. This has nothing to do with censorship. People who objected to the ad were exercising free speech. The company pulling their own ad was making a business decision.

0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:43 am
@dlowan,
It has been a long-standing joke among Yankees that so many Southerners affect the title of Colonel. It's a rather outdated stereotype, though. However, it did at one time have a very plausible historical basis. Kentucky, for example, was settled in the teeth of vigorous Amerindian opposition, which was fueled and funded by the English at Detroit. (Detroit should have been American territory, but the English refused to evacuate the post, and it was one of their first targets when the War of 1812--known to the English as the American War--began.) At the time of the War of 1812, the English also instigated the Amerindians of the American southeast, and in 1813, the settlers in Tennessee fought the Creek War. The officer who commanded those forces was Andrew Jackson. Jackson became a national hero when he routed an army of English veterans of the Napoleonic Wars at New Orleans in January, 1815, when the war had actually already ended.

After the Creek War, Andy Jackson rewarded his followers by organizing a state militia in Tennessee and making these men officers. That humbug American "hero" David Crockett, who was in fact AWOL (absent without leave) for most of the war, was made a Major in the militia. Isaac Brock, and Englishman who has become a great Canadian hero, began the War of 1812 by taking Detroit back from the Americans. His principle Amerindian ally was Tecumseh, a Shawnee leader who had attempted to organize aboriginal resistance to white settlement. There was a massacre of prisoners at Detroit by Indians, whom Tecumseh could not control. Nevertheless, Tecumseh (who is also a Canadian hero) became the devil incarnate for Americans, and as he had plagued the settlers in Kentucky, Kentucky volunteers flocked to the banner of "Mad Anthony" Wayne, a Revolutionary War veteran who took Detroit back, and chased the English and Tecumseh with the Indian allies into Upper Canada (Ontario). Tecumseh was killed at the battle of the Thames River near present-day London, Ontario.

After these wars, Andrew Jackson went into politics, as did so many veterans (including the totally clueless "Davey" Crockett--Crockett hated and did not use the name "Davey," until he became a popular figure, and then he used the name to attempt to further his quixotic political career). In the 1824 election, there was only one political party, the Democratic-Republicans, then usually known as the Republicans (and no relation to the modern Republicans), and the two vote winners were Jackson and John Quincy Adams, son of the second President. The deal was the Jackson would be President and Adams Vice President. However, as they tied in the electoral college, the election was thrown into the House of Representatives, where the Speaker, Henry Clay, swung to the vote to Adams, because he despised Jackson, and commented that he didn't think that slaughtering a few thousand Englishmen at New Orleans qualified a man to be the chief magistrate.

Jackson was infuriated, for obvious reasons, so taking the great American dictum of don't get mad, get even, he created the world's first modern political party, the Democratic Party. It was an amalgam of disillusioned Democratic-Republicans and frontier settlers, and he organized it around the militia officers who had profited from his patronage after the Creek War. The party was organized from the ground up, in military fashion, with war leaders, precinct leaders, county leaders and state organizations. He absolutely buried Adams in the 1828 election. He accomplished it because of his well-organized political party machine.

After the Creek War, the territories of Alabama and Mississippi were open to settlement, and the English were forced out of Florida. Most of the new settlers in these territories came from Tennessee, just as Tennessee and Kentucky had been settled from Virginia. Local militia officers became the community and political leaders. Of course, when a man reached the pinnacle of his career in the militia, he attained the rank of Colonel. When he retired from active public life, he was replaced by another militia officer promoted to Colonel, but retained the title as a courtesy. So it was literally true that the South abounded in Colonels, who were all men of standing and influence in their respective communities. There was no parallel structure in the North. The veterans of the Shawnee Wars and the War of 1812 in Canada from Kentucky took a similar route, and that state was soon oversupplied with Colonels.

There was once an American Basketball League, as competition for the National Basketball League. It didn't last, but while it did, there was a team in Louisville, Kentucky called the Kentucky Colonels. The institution of militia Colonels being the leading men in their communities was so well entrenched in Kentucky that eventually the Governor was given the power to confer the title on any prominent man, without regard to a military function. I don't know if it were true, but it was claimed that Harlan Sanders was a holder of the honorary title of Colonel, and many Americans still refer to KFC as "Colonel Sanders," as in, "Let's go get something for dinner at Colonel Sanders."
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:44 am
@ebrown p,
ebrown p wrote:
This whining about "political rectitude"-- the idea seems to be that minorities who are upset about something should just shut up.


What a fuckin' idiot. I wasn't whining. Expressing my contempt for your idiotic obsessions doesn't constitute whining. I do sincerely wish that people who manufacture excuses to whine about a non-existent prejudice would shut the **** up, and you head my list.

Creep.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:46 am
@ebrown p,
ebrown p wrote:

DJ,

Are you making the argument that being white (and male and straight) in the United states is a disadvantage?

If you are not making this argument, then I don't think disagree with you (although in that case I don't see your point).

(Setanta... if you would be so kind as to explain to DJ why the noose is a particularly troubling symbol in American history.)



Maybe you can explain to Djjd why punching someone in the face should be less troubling that putting a noose on someone's office door.
snood
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:48 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Certainly Americans associate fried chicken with the "Old South." But it never had, to my knowledge, a racial association. With regard to Kentucky Fried Chicken, my only reaction when it first because a wide-spread and successful enterprise was to wonder why anyone would think that fried chicken from Kentucky in particular was "superior," or exemplary of the best fried chicken. In those days, Harlan Sanders still owned KFC (he's the guy who is represented in the KFC logo), and i later learned his story. He had begun his business selling his product to grocery store owners from the back of his station wagon, and parlayed it through franchising into a major corporation. He sold his business in the 1970s for $76,000,000 US, which is pretty damned good money now, and was an enormous sum more than 30 years ago. And KFC is popular all over the United States, not just in the South; furthermore, it's popular with just about any Americans who are not fanatical vegetarians, without regard to skin color.

Hell, it's popular in Canada, too. But Popeye's is much better, and i suspect has stolen major market share from KFC.


The twelve step meetings I go to occasionally have an "eatin' meetin'"; a potluck followed by a speaker. Not too long ago, I got greeted by one of the local rednecks with "I KNEW you'd be here - there's fried chicken today!"
We only know each other passingly, so it wasn't an aside about familiar food favorites. In this context, there wasn't any ambiguity about the sneering racist insinuation.

I can see where Aussie culture might have a blind spot for this type of thing, of course.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:51 am
@snood,
Did you point out to that clown that he had showed up for the fried chicken, too? When i was in college, all over the North, the American Legion used to have fried chicken dinners as a fund raising event. It was, therefore, devoid of the racial association, since most of the American Legion posts engaging in the activity were in all-white small towns. When, in the 1960s, the American Legion would hold pro-war rallies, we would show up to chant "fried chicken, fried chicken." It didn't really make any sense, but it pissed them off, which was why we did it.
0 Replies
 
ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:56 am
@Setanta,
Quote:

Maybe you can explain to Djjd why punching someone in the face should be less troubling that putting a noose on someone's office door.


The noose is a reference to the practice of lynching in which thousands of predominantly African-American men were brutally killed in the US between the years of 1890 to 1951.

Lynching was a means to keep African-Americans subjugated by instilling fear and trying to take away human dignity.

This is why the noose remains a disgusting symbol of terror and hatred.


dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:57 am
@snood,
Quote:
I can see where Aussie culture might have a blind spot for this type of thing, of course.

Actually no spot at all, at least within my circle of friends.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:59 am
@ebrown p,
I see you have completely failed to address the issue of violent physical assault. I don't need a clown like you to tell me about lynching. Why not stop side-stepping and address the issue of the physical assault to which Djjd referred, and for which he provided a link to an account of the event?

Deluded creep.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 09:01 am
@shewolfnm,
Quote:
But isnt this imposing someone elses morals, values and ethics onto someone else? the someones in this case being societies..
Why should Australia now have to be subjected to censorship that is acceptable in another country but not their own? Why should they be required to think like the US and shun that commercial?


If it WERE racially offensive here, the same bloody morals and ethics would apply!!!

It simply isn't offensive.

Only US context makes it offensive.

It isn't about whether morals and ethics apply, it's about whether something is an offence against them.

It was designed for an audience which would see no reason to think racially about the ad.

 

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