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. . . in an unsentimental and practical way

 
 
Setanta
 
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 03:04 am
I was recently re-reading a P. D. James novel (she is the author of a series of very popular detective novels) and i was struck by a line from one of her characters that i had not recalled. (So what if it's genre fiction, wisdom is where you find it.)

The character says that if mankind does not learn to love one another in an unsentimental and practical way, they will destroy themselves. What do you think about that proposition, goys and birls?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 13 • Views: 3,227 • Replies: 56
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dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 03:46 am
do i have to love you?

nope its not gonna happen

0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 03:53 am
You got that right . . .

That's the point of saying "in an unsentimental and practical way," Digger.
roger
 
  2  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 04:10 am
@Setanta,
Well then, I admit I don't know what love "in an unsentimental and practical way" means. I'll keep an eye out for her stuff though, and give it a try.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 04:32 am
@roger,
Well, i think you would enjoy her stuff. She's responsible for the Adam Dalgleish mysteries you might have seen on television.

By unsentimental and practical, the author is saying love which is not romantic, and which concerns itself with the useful and the possible. You know, that "love thy neighbor as thyself" sort of thing?
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 05:05 am
@Setanta,
I have been thinking about that for some time, Set. "Greater love has no man/woman, than he lay down his life for a friend." I really don't think that means dying; I think it means a willingness to consider the needs of others first.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 05:53 am
Long time no see Miss Lettybettyhettygettymarycustislee . . . do you think that a failure to act in this matter dooms us all?
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 06:08 am
@Setanta,
I think, Set, that doom does not necessarily mean death and destruction, but the failure of each individual to see inside another's soul. Make sense?
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 06:18 am
Have you been playin' the peepin' Tom into people's souls again, Miss Letty?
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 06:31 am
@Setanta,
Well, Set, I didn't look at Lady Godiva, but I interpret "soul" as a feeling just as most black musicians do. So, Irish, when you look past the exterior or fail to do so, that is self destruction and in doing so, we not only "doom" ourselves, but others as well.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 07:06 am
@Setanta,
can't argue with the sentiment
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 11:00 am
Anything PD James says I tend to agree with wholeheartedly and unconditionally. There's one fine writer, nemmind the subject matter.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 02:32 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

I was recently re-reading a P. D. James novel (she is the author of a series of very popular detective novels) and i was struck by a line from one of her characters that i had not recalled. (So what if it's genre fiction, wisdom is where you find it.)

The character says that if mankind does not learn to love one another in an unsentimental and practical way, they will destroy themselves. What do you think about that proposition, goys and birls?


The statement seems to believe that mankind will destroy itself if it does not follow this advice. I think it is a zero sum game. Only one side gets destroyed, not mankind itself.

Plus, too few people in different societies could even effect this advice, in my opinion. I believe this advice may already apply within some ethnic/nationality groups, but outside the ethnic/nationality groups the "others" are not afforded such concerns.

Saying we will all be losers, because mankind will be destroyed, is just a sales pitch, in my opinion.

The advice is already reflected in the lives of many a saint, I believe; however, how much of mankind can be a saint?

dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 03:52 pm
@Foofie,
Quote:
how much of mankind can be a saint?
well, there's me and setanta and merry andrew and djjd and of course St Gus for a start.
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 04:05 pm
@dyslexia,
'Preciate your puttin' me in such fine company, dys.
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 04:06 pm
@Merry Andrew,
Merry Andrew wrote:

'Preciate your puttin' me in such fine company, dys.
I still have you on ignore shithead.
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 04:25 pm
@dyslexia,
I notice there are no women represented in your very short list... what are you saying, exactly, dys-head?
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 04:34 pm
@Mame,
I have no intention of lowering the status of women by putting them in the same category as meself, setanta, merry andrew, djjd or gus. the women remain on pedestals far above our heads.
LionTamerX
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 04:49 pm
@dyslexia,
Quote:
@Mame,
I have no intention of lowering the status of women by putting them in the same category as meself, setanta, merry andrew, djjd or gus. the women remain on pedestals far above our heads.


Well played, you old unsentimental, practical fool.
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Dec, 2009 04:49 pm
@dyslexia,
testify
 

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