7
   

Romance novels, #@$%

 
 
olla86
 
  0  
Reply Wed 26 Aug, 2009 07:20 am
I am agree.I just finished to read Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier, it is intresting and weakening novel!

____________________
LIFE IS GOOD!
Gala
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Aug, 2009 07:51 am
@Green Witch,
I recently purchased 3 Harlequin novels for .25 cents apiece for a 27 yr. old Phd student from S. Korea. He hired me to tutor him in English and he requested romance novels-- come to find out, as I had him read from them aloud, the Harlequins do not meet much of a standard for good writing. The sentences get strung out and confusing, so in the long-run they wouldn't be much help to him to learn English.

What I like about the historical romances, as you've said, the women always have grit and they defy the rules of society. They've got balls. Unlike, say, Jane Austen's Emma, where she adhered to all the rules and did a lot of fretting in between before her romantic aspirations worked out.

In the Christian authors approach the women are always in a "helping" profession; secretary, librairian, elementary school teacher. They're never power houses of personality except when it comes to, what else, running the home. Sure, the good Christian husband ends up changing the diapers, but that's about as advanced as it gets.

I'd definitley put James Patterson under trash. Talk about formulaic writing. I stopped reading his novels a while ago because the greusome level rose with every new book.

I agree with you about reading for knowledge and pleasure and not to impress. Amen to that.

Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Aug, 2009 08:01 am
@Gala,
I've worked with ESL students for years. I prefer to use good children's literature like Roald Dahl, Madeleine L'Engle and EB White. They still have adult accessible humor and themes in their books, but the text is simple well-written English. Plus, I don't get bored hearing the stories over and over. I'm not sure I would comfortable hearing some romance novels read out-loud in a public space. I blush easily.
Gala
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Aug, 2009 08:31 am
@Green Witch,
It was one-on-one in a room with a closed door. Because most of the tutoring was geared toward conversation, he'd only read from one page, like the introduction, nothing revealing at all.

The reality for most ESL students, especially the ones from Asia is how much they crave contact with people but the cultural differences make them hesitant. They're concerned about being offensive, as a result, they keep to themselves and get lonely.

The guy I tutored struggled mostly with feeling alienated, which I can understand, even as a native I often feel like an alien myself.

I'd thought about using childrens literature, thanks for mentioning it. As it turns out, the fellow I tutored left for school in NY today, but his brother, who lives in Waashington, asked if I would tutor him. So I may use some of those books.
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Aug, 2009 08:48 am
@Gala,
Just one last none romantic thought since you mentioned conversation - I also like to use plays with ESL students. I take one role and my student takes another. They feel confident because the words are in front of them and it helps them to understand how the language flows between two people.

I agree about the Asian cultural barriers and making friends. Most are very shy in social situations, especially the men. Asian women often find girlfriends at work or school, but the men seem to have a hard time creating any bonds that do not involve introductions via family members. I tried to get one 26 year old Chinese man together with one of my Chinese female students and he suggested I contact his mother to arrange a meeting between his mom and the girl first. His mother still lived in Hong Kong.
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Wed 26 Aug, 2009 09:07 am
I pulled the book to my breast and felt it swell with desire. "Read me" it whispered as it stroked my hair. I gasped as I felt the pages flutter lower, ever lower, against my warm skin. Temptation surged trough me as I ran my hand down the stiff spine and over the soft cover.

"Stop" I pleaded. "We have to wait" I sobbed. "The oven timer is pinging and I can't bear to ruin the cupcakes I baked for the orphan's picnic" I panted as I pushed the book away from me.

mismi
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Aug, 2009 09:47 am
@boomerang,
Now that was a good read. WHEW! All stirred up I am.
0 Replies
 
Gala
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Aug, 2009 09:52 am
@Green Witch,
Thanks for the information about reading plays, another good idea.

The men are shy, but in Asia they've been raised to be deferred to. Women are subservient, no matter what.

At one point when the Korean fellow was reading from the intro to the Harlequin the word alpha-male came up. I explained it to him and added that upon occasion some women who are strong and take initiative are considered alpha female.

He point to me and said "alpha-female", which cracked me up. He was willing to be in the presence and be taught by a strong American female. However, when he articulated the kind of woman he wanted marry her role would be squarely rooted in the kitchen and the home.







0 Replies
 
Gala
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Aug, 2009 09:55 am
@boomerang,
Such admirable restraint and sacrifice on your part...
0 Replies
 
Francis
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Aug, 2009 09:58 am
@boomerang,
Are you starting a new career, Boom?
0 Replies
 
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Aug, 2009 10:03 am
@boomerang,
yummmm...cupcakes.
0 Replies
 
Gala
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Aug, 2009 10:45 am
@olla86,
Daphne Du Maurier writes romance? Tell all...
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 08/19/2019 at 11:19:39