Gala
 
Reply Mon 24 Aug, 2009 07:46 am
Even though I'm grown up I enjoy reading YA fiction. I just picked up a good one the other day called:

24 Girls In 7 Days by Alex Bradley.

It's a hoot, I highly recommend it for anyone looking for a fun , light read. The writer has an acid tongue. Great fun!

Anybody here read YA fiction?

It brings me back to my teen years with some perspective: when I was going through it it was torture, but as an adult, it seems real and worthy of a lot of the angst we all went through...
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engineer
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Aug, 2009 07:56 am
@Gala,
I enjoyed "The Adventures of Fan Boy and Goth Girl" though I think most of it went over my teen-ager's head. I just got "The Graveyard Book" and my children (9-15) loved it. It's targeted to a slightly younger audience than YA, but it won the Newberry and the Hugo (?!).
Gala
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Aug, 2009 08:00 am
@engineer,
I've written those down, thanks for posting them.

Here's another one that's a hoot that your kid might like: Son Of The Mob by Gordan Korman. If your kid doesn't like it, you will
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Aug, 2009 08:19 am
some of my recent faves

http://dvirlovesbooks.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/the_graveyard_book_uk.jpg

http://a7.vox.com/6a00c2252d77b88e1d00e398d04f070004-500pi

http://www.sd68.k12.il.us/schools/orchard/lmc/Book%20Covers/evil_genius.jpg

http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/images/n50/n252382.jpg

http://www.booksofwonder.com/images/144941.dd.jpg

http://osterhoutteens.files.wordpress.com/2009/04/hunger.jpg

Gala
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Aug, 2009 11:16 am
@djjd62,
the graveyard book reappears again. thanks for posting them, i've written them down and will investigate...
0 Replies
 
Gala
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Sep, 2009 09:46 am
I just finished a really good one called: An Abuundance Of Katherines by John Green. So funny and well written, I recommend it.

0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Sep, 2009 10:06 am
I read everything my daughter does for school. She is in the fifth grade so a bit younger than the teen age group. I had thoroughly enjoyed her summer reading. I read the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson " seeing you like laughs, there is great humor in the book, but a predictable ending. About a girl moving from China to New York.

I read Number the Stars. Great first introduction into Holocaust. It takes place in Nazi controlled Denmark about a girl whose best friend is Jewish and helping her family escape.

And the last was Julie and the Wolves. Takes place in Alaska about a 13 year old girl who escapes from a young forced marriage and lives alone and how she survives several months in the wild.
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Sep, 2009 10:18 am
reading along, I remember reading a series of books when I was in elementary school (i was a library rat) called the boxcar children.

I know it was aimed at younger kids, but did anyone else read them?
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Sep, 2009 10:20 am
@Rockhead,
My daughter loves these. I've read them - now in 5th grade she is getting just a bit too old for them. But my younger - 1st grader has started. We read one together over the summer (for a more advanced reading summer assignment),
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Sep, 2009 10:45 am
Gala, I love YA fiction! I get free advanced copies from a local bookstore after they are done reading them. I teach middle school, so we get freebies.

Most of the books I've recently read are at school and I am home sick today. I'll try to find the ones I really liked.

A book about a rural girl and a city girl on a student exchange with each other.
http://blogs.kcls.org/newbery/Faith%20Hope%20and%20Ivy%20June.jpg

About young folks in love (he loves her, she loves someone else, etc)
http://www.harpercollins.com/harperimages/isbn/large/2/9780061128462.jpg

About a monster fighting troupe disguised as pizza shop employees
http://media.us.macmillan.com/jackets/258H/9780312373795.jpg

Two kids sent to their grandmother's house in Great Britain discover secrets of the past
http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/images/n51/n257467.jpg

Another about kids at a granparent's place - this time they discover an other worldy game
http://images.barnesandnoble.com/images/7460000/7469418.jpg

A very smart girl with a sling shot has a mystery to discover
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_Zrhu8t15yy8/Snna5jr1cwI/AAAAAAAABMA/hZhksO7h2lA/s400/1emily+the+strange.jpg

About coping with another's suicide
http://bookshelvesofdoom.blogs.com/.a/6a00d8345169e469e201053657e8ee970c-320wi

About a young witch and her pictsies - by one of my favorite authors
http://www.e-steve.co.uk/Jo/Discworld/Images/A%20Hat%20Full%20of%20Sky.jpg
0 Replies
 
Gala
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Sep, 2009 11:24 am
Wow, thanks for your responses--

Linkat, I like the younger age fiction too. If you want another Holocaust story for your 5th grader, there's the real life story called Hanna's Suitcase about a Japanese school teacher who decides to teach her students about the Holocaust and in the process gets sent this suitcase from WWII. The story revolves around her trying to locate Hanna-- what a tear jerker.

I'm such a Luddite, I don't know how to post an image here, so here's the link:

http://www.seedsofunfolding.org/issues/11_07/Hannas-Suitcase.jpg

Little K, that is, like, one of the best perks of your job, getting those books. Thanks for posting all your preferences, I'm putting them on my list.



0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Sep, 2009 01:54 pm
@djjd62,
I was not impressed with Hunger Games.

Early on, it showed promise as social criticism. (Our armed forces could be considered child sacrifices with the poor disproportionately represented.)

It quickly devolved into cheap action thrills, though. I find quite enough real-world pathos, without having to read about children murdering each other in a cage match.

Plus, too many coincidences for the outcome to be plausible.
Gala
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Sep, 2009 05:20 am
@djjd62,
I tutor English and used The Graveyard Book for their reading skills to read aloud. I found it to be too grim, unfortunately, and abandoned it.

I think if I were the age the book is written for I would find it interesting, but as an adult it's too fantastic.
Gala
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Oct, 2009 07:03 am
I just read another really good one this weekend-- Dairy Queen by Catherine Murdoch. although I am a little dismayed to ahve just found out she's the sister of Elizabeth Gilbert who wrote the ridiculous Eat, Pray, Love.
0 Replies
 
Gala
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Nov, 2009 07:13 am
The Princess Diaries. What a hoot. I never saw the movie and don't intend to.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Nov, 2009 07:41 am
Tomorrow when the war began: 8 book series
Quote:
Set in the current day and told through the highly readable journal of Ellie Linton, the very Australian daughter of sheep farmers, the seven books of the "Tomorrow" series are the story of how a group of Australian teenagers respond to the surprise invasion of their country.


http://lisamello.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/tomorrow-when-the-war-began.jpg
Quote:

The Tomorrow series, while best known in Australia, has also found success in other countries. In Sweden, the first title " Tomorrow, When the War Began " was selected as the world’s most likely book to inspire young people to read, prompting 100,000 free copies to be released for distribution among Swedish young people. The Third Day, the Frost, won the Buxtehude Bulle, a German award, regarded as one of the world’s most coveted prizes for young peoples’ books.


I couldnt put it down. read the over about a week.
Some of the action takes place not far from my home.


Gala
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Nov, 2009 11:27 am
@dadpad,
Unfortunately, it's not in the catalogue at the library.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Nov, 2009 11:30 am
@dadpad,
i've heard a lot of good things about the series, i'll have to check them out
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Nov, 2009 11:33 am
@DrewDad,
i got it as audiobook, sometimes that makes a different, to me anyway about how i feel about a book

i tried for a long time to get into the harry potter books, but couldn't, then i got the audiobooks read by stephen fry and never looked back

i've got the sequel to the hunger games, catching fire, in my audio library, i'll let you know what i think of it (it could be a while, i've got a lot of audio ahead of it)
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Nov, 2009 11:35 am
@Gala,
Gala wrote:
I think if I were the age the book is written for I would find it interesting, but as an adult it's too fantastic.


i hope this never happens to me, i'm 46 and hope to never grow up
 

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