9
   

Saw: counter rotating blade technology

 
 
Reply Sun 14 Jun, 2009 01:49 pm
Saw a commercial for a saw that cuts almost everything. The main exception was concrete and marble, but the saw can be outfitted with diamond blades for that.
https://www.dualsaw.com/templates/tvgoods/omnidualsaw/806/images/order-dual-saw.jpg
It utilizes two blades, spinning counter to each other. I could not tell if it cuts through the thickness of a 2x4. The objects they were cutting seemed relatively thin. They cut metal, copper, pvc. Even an egg. The saw cut halfway through the egg without making a mess. Anybody ever see one in person?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 9 • Views: 8,709 • Replies: 44
No top replies

 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Jun, 2009 02:16 pm
@edgarblythe,
First I ever heard of it. Interesting, but I still subscribe to the KISS school of thought when it comes to tools. Lets see if Bosche or Dewalt jumps on the idea before we buy into it.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Jun, 2009 02:19 pm
They drove a big nail in the end of a pole and cut it off with the saw, then, in the same motion went on to cut all those other things. Very exciting to a guy that uses saws for so many purposes.
Reyn
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Jun, 2009 05:29 pm
@edgarblythe,
Watching someone use tools well is better than watching sports, for me, teehee!
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Jun, 2009 05:31 pm
@Reyn,
ain't that the truth!
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Jun, 2009 06:40 pm
@edgarblythe,
This tool was featured on _Pitchmen_ a few episodes ago. It seemed like the real deal to me.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Jun, 2009 07:02 pm
@edgarblythe,
Remember the "Rotozip"? I went and bought one based on the TV INFOMERCIALS. I used it a few times and took that POS back. It has none of the attributes that the ad seems to hawk. Its very unstable and the only way to punch cut wood is to make a frame around which the blade travels. The only thing I can see about this saw is that Ill bet it makes one hell of a thick kerf.Its like a table saw and a radial arm saw in one.
Like Rog said, if a big time tool mfr jumos on it, maybe its worth a second look.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Jun, 2009 07:40 pm
The infomercial shows them cutting plywood, starting at the middle and cutting backwards and forwards, and no splinters.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Jun, 2009 07:44 pm
@edgarblythe,
so they plunge cut to get started?. So what's the advantage?
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Jun, 2009 08:06 pm
@farmerman,
In some instances plunge cutting could be a boon, if the final cut does not run to the edge. They were cutting the diamod plate metal, corrugated metal - You name it. Don't get me wrong. I don't have nearly $200 to chance losing, but I was impressed with their video. We cut lots of Hardyplank at work, and the blades get dull very quickly. We have never found a satisfactory tool for cutting that stuff.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Jun, 2009 08:10 pm
It utilizes lubricating sticks for some jobs.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Jun, 2009 04:30 am
@edgarblythe,
I dont know but Ive never used a rotary saw blade for cutting OUT stock. The kerf it leaves is a big round one that you have to address by stopping short of the marker lines and then finishing with something like a sawzall or a good saber saw. Ill have to se the infomercial.
Theres another tool which is a vibrating plate that can be used for stuff like tile trimming or grout cutting. Its the "Multi Tool and it only costs like 349 bucks. IMHO th multitool is another rotozip.

Cobalt , a Chinese outfit, is making a number of specialty power tools that are surprisingly, not too bad. (Usually Chinese metallurgy is really bad, so I have to reserve any final judgements until the new Cobalt air compressor station I bought , and the tools that come with it, breaks.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Jun, 2009 04:47 am
Home Depot and Lowe's have been selling some tools that actually work for surprisingly low prices. I bought a ten inch glide chop saw for $200. So far, it does nice work.
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Jun, 2009 07:32 am
I can cut without tearout, too, if I use some sacrificial scrap.

I wonder:
1. What precautions did they not show on the infomercial?
2. Are they using the stock blades, or are they using the fancy blades on the easy cuts?
3. How many takes did they make before they found a keeper?

What is the point of a counter-rotating blade? It's not like I have a huge amount of torque from my circular saw.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Jun, 2009 07:37 am
@DrewDad,
OK, I get the point of the counter-rotating blades - when you perform a plunge cut, the saw won't try to take off across the room.

The quality of the cut seems to depend on their blades, though, not the saw itself.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Jun, 2009 09:57 am
@farmerman,
rotozip
on the evolutionary chain it was akin to a dodo
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Jun, 2009 10:32 am
@panzade,
Its only purpose for being was to extract money from unsuspecting tool junkies. It waas the tool world equivalent of that old hot dog electrocution machine that was ultimately banned for being a "deadly appliance"
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Jun, 2009 12:08 pm
https://www.dualsaw.com/
I don't know if I am allowed to post a link to the infomrcial, but here it is for now.
0 Replies
 
Intrepid
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Jun, 2009 01:12 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

Its only purpose for being was to extract money from unsuspecting tool junkies. It waas the tool world equivalent of that old hot dog electrocution machine that was ultimately banned for being a "deadly appliance"


You and Panzade do not seem to appreciate the RotoZip.

I have one and, although, I have not used it much I found it useful for certain jobs. It does require a certain amount of skill to use it properly.

I would be interested to know if either or both of you own one or are just going by hearsay.

Regarding the topic of this thread. I watched the video and was not particularly impressed since the saw is very small. It does, however, (like the Rotozip) probably has a place for certain jobs.

I would think that the kerf would be large due to the two blades. It also appears that plunge cuts are required since one of the blades is spinning backwards and would create an unsafe situation if used the same as a regular circular saw.

I never trust stuff that is only sold over the internet and on TV. Why aren't they in stores?

It does seem that the blades are what the tool is all about and I wonder about availability for replacement.
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Jun, 2009 01:20 pm
has to be a gear of some sort to make the second blade reverse. (weak spot?)

prolly a good reason they don't show thick stock cuts...
 

Related Topics

Craftsman Tablesaw Vibration - Question by CDobyns
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Saw: counter rotating blade technology
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 07/13/2020 at 10:23:11