4
   

Free Aung San Suu Kyi

 
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Nov, 2010 08:02 am
@msolga,
my guess, they're trying to come up with a condition she can't help but break so they can re-arrest her
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Nov, 2010 08:17 am
@djjd62,
I don't know about rearresting her, dj....
I think the problem is that she is not agreeing to the junta's terms of release. (ie they she virtually vanish from public life, stay out of Burmese politics.)

The generals seems desperate for respectability & legitimacy following the very recent election. Rearresting her certainly wouldn't achieve that.
My hunch is that they'd prefer to delay her release, rather than release her, only to place her back in detention again. (again!)
So we have an impasse. I seriously doubt that she will agree to their terms.
It will be very interesting to see what happens tomorrow.
Amazing that one slight, principled woman can strike such fear in the hearts of these military thugs, isn't it?
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Nov, 2010 08:20 am
@msolga,
of course they cold be putting the final touches on the accident she's going have while crossing the street a month or so from now, a totally random accident, not in any way connected to the government, nudge, nudge, wink, wink
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Nov, 2010 08:26 am
@djjd62,
Nah. Smile

I think, it just might be possible, that she's got them in a corner!
Seriously, I think it's more urgent for them that she be released at this point in time, than it is for her.
She's made it clear that she will not be gagged.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Nov, 2010 08:34 am
Then, of course, there are her supporters.
There will be a great deal of anger at the generals if Aung San Suu Kyi is not released .. or rearrested again, following her release from detention ...:


Quote:

Supporters continue wait for Suu Kyi release
Updated 2 hours 23 minutes ago
http://www.abc.net.au/reslib/201011/r672463_4903070.jpg
Anticipation is growing among Aung San Suu Kyi's supporters amid rumours of her release. (Reuters: Soe Zeya Tu)

Burma's opposition party has told supporters gathered outside the house of party leader Aung San Suu Kyi to go home and come back in the morning.

The supporters had gathered outside Ms Suu Kyi's home and the party headquarters amid speculation she was about to be released from detention.

Ten trucks of police were stationed a one-minute drive away from the house where the democracy icon has been held for the best part of the last 20 years, and the route was cleared of traffic.

Ms Suu Kyi was due to be released from house arrest on Saturday.

The speculation she would be freed on Friday started when officials of the military junta entered her home at midday (local time).

Journalists and supporters gathered outside her home, waiting to see her released. Another 800 people gathered at the NLD headquarters.

But as night fell in Burma, the National League for Democracy (NLD) told those gathered to go home and come back on Saturday. ...<cont>


http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/11/12/3065273.htm
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Nov, 2010 08:37 am
@msolga,
unfortunately, when it comes to most things in life i don't see the glass as half full or half empty, i see it as knocked off the table, the glass broken, the drink spilled, and it was the last one in the refrigerator too
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Nov, 2010 08:44 am
@djjd62,
Aw, chin up, dj! Smile
It will be such a moment when she walks free & addresses her followers!
She has been such an important symbol of democracy, of hope, for the poor & the oppressed people of Burma. What an appalling, hard time they've had to endure at the hands of the generals.

0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Nov, 2010 08:04 pm
Waiting, waiting, waiting patiently (well, sort of! Wink ) for the big moment to come.
Quote:
Aung San Suu Kyi keeps her people, and the junta, waiting one more night

Burma's general sign order freeing Aung San Suu Kyi, but democracy activist demands unconditional release
http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Admin/BkFill/Default_image_group/2010/11/12/1289579358101/Supporters-of-Aung-San-Su-006.jpg
Supporters of Aung San Suu Kyi outside the National League for Democracy HQ in Rangoon Supporters of Aung San Suu Kyi gather outside the National League for Democracy headquarters in Rangoon, Burma, waiting for her release. Photograph: AFP/Getty Images

After seven years under house arrest and 15 of the last 21 incarcerated in some form by Burma's military regime, Aung San Suu Kyi today chose one last night of imprisonment so that she might walk truly free.

As speculation over her imminent release reached fever pitch in her home city of Rangoon, word spread that military officials had visited her house and that the order had been signed authorising her immediate release.

Mid-afternoon Burma time, the Guardian understands, the 65-year-old was told she was free to leave the two-storey lakeside villa which the junta had made her prison for most of this decade.

Attached to her release, the military sought to impose strict conditions, understood to be restrictions on where she could travel within Burma, and with whom she could meet.

It was rumoured that Aung San Suu Kyi, Burma's best-known democracy advocate and a Nobel peace laureate, demanded an unconditional release and insisted on negotiating her unfettered freedom with military officials before she would set foot outside her door.

From early morning in Rangoon, expectation had grown that Aung San Suu Kyi's release was imminent and could come, with truly Burmese unpredictability, a single day before the 13 November, the day her sentence was due to end....<cont>


http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/nov/12/burma-aung-san-suu-kyi-release-delay
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Nov, 2010 05:27 am
Surprised

Oh I do hope this information is correct!

At last!!!!

Very Happy

From the Guardian's live coverage of Aung San Suu Kyi's release:


Quote:
11.09am: The BBC's Adam Mynott says Aung San Suu Kyi has been released. She is standing on a box outside her house, waving at the crowd, trying to quieten them so she can speak.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/nov/13/aung-san-suu-kyi-burma
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Nov, 2010 05:36 am
@msolga,
Yes!!!!!!

Quote:

Burma releases Aung San Suu Kyi

http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/49925000/jpg/_49925896_010635891-1.jpg
Supporters of Aung San Suu Kyi in Rangoon (13 November 2010) Ms Suu Kyi's supporters gathered at her home in anticipation of her release

The military authorities in Burma have released the pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi.

She has appeared in front of a crowd of her supporters who rushed to her house in Rangoon when nearby barricades were removed by the security forces.

The Nobel Peace Prize winner has been detained for 15 of the past 21 years.

Earlier, Ms Suu Kyi's lawyer warned that she was highly unlikely to accept a conditional release if it excluded her from political activity.

The government has restricted her travel and freedom to associate during previous brief spells of liberty, and demanded she quit politics.

She was originally due to be released from house arrest last year, but a case involving an American who swam across Inya Lake to her home, claiming he was on a mission to save her, prompted the latest detention.

Last Sunday, the political party supported by the military government won the country's first election in 20 years. The ballot was widely condemned.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-11749661
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Nov, 2010 07:53 am
Quote:
BBC VIDEO:13 November 2010 Last updated at 12:45 GMT

The military authorities in Burma have released the pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi.

From the scene, the BBC's John Simpson describes the emotional and powerful moments as she addressed the crowds.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-11749742
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Nov, 2010 08:10 am
@msolga,
A week after they win the fake election? After years stating she is no longer interested in politics. I'm happy for her on a personal level but the general Burmese population is still massively oppressed.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Nov, 2010 08:35 am
@hingehead,
Of course they are still oppressed. And will be for some time to come.
And she has been freed only because the Burmese junta wants legitimacy from the rest of the world. That's why this bogus "election" was held.
However, she has been the figurehead for the democracy movement in Burma for years now. (Remember, she was first jailed after winning a genuine democratic election. The last one held in Burma.)

When did she say she was not interested in politics?
She could have been free years ago if she'd left Burma (she would never have been allowed to return), but she refused, even when her husband was dying (in England.)
That was very much a political stance, surely?
I understand her supporters are to meet her at her party's headquarters tomorrow, for an address.

I'm not saying she can change Burma tomorrow. Of course she can't. I don't think anyone can. Anyway, let's see what happens next. It looks very much like she has stood her ground & not agreed to the junta's conditions for her release. It sounds very much like she has no intention of being gagged.
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Nov, 2010 08:54 am
@msolga,
Hi Olgs, my 'not interested in politics anymore' was from a Guardian article a couple of years ago, where she said she felt she'd suffered enough and had nothing more to offer her people, and hoped the next generation would continue the struggle. In retrospect it may have been a shield as nothing she said to international media would be hidden from the junta.

In support of my vague thesis is the fact that if she posed any sort of threat the junta would be unlikely to release her, although I'm sure they're keeping tabs on her movements and conversations. And nothing could stop them from re-imprisoning her. :-(
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Nov, 2010 09:23 am
@hingehead,
(I didn't see that article, hinge, but I definitely can see her encouraging the next generation to continue the struggle. Her incarceration, for all these years, has been part of that struggle. She's been a big pain in the junta's side. )

I'd say, by her actions, she remains very interested in Burmese politics.
Including her party boycotting the recent sham elections. (Though a break-away group did decide to be involved.)

However, she's recently cautioned her followers not to expect too much from her release. I mean, realistically, how easy would it be to organize opposition against a ruthless military dictatorship through passive resistance & inspiring leadership? However, judging by her obvious steely determination, she will not remain silent & yes, it's a possibility that she could be right back under house arrest, any time.

But the generals ruling Burma (& now the "legitimate elected government". Ha.) have been under intense world-wide pressure. (Unfortunately excluding, China. Which remains a powerful supporter.) And I'm thinking the last thing they'd want is to have to deal with the backlash & protests if they put her under detention again. So I think Aung San Suu Kyi's next moves & public utterances will be very interesting. How much will she be able to get away with?
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Nov, 2010 09:29 am
@msolga,
Sadly the Burmese government is already a pariah, so there isn't much they can do to lower their standing.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Nov, 2010 09:43 am
@hingehead,
Of course!
(Remember those terrible floods in 1996, when they refused desperately needed foreign assistance for their people because of paranoia about "external interference" in the country? Outrageous.)
And god knows how many political prisoners are still locked up in their jails.

But it's vitally important for them to have shown "progress toward democracy". Which included the sham election & the release of Aung San Suu Kyi. They want respectability & legitimacy. Don't ask me why, but they obviously do.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Nov, 2010 06:10 pm
@msolga,
Quote:
But it's vitally important for them to have shown "progress toward democracy". Which included the sham election & the release of Aung San Suu Kyi. They want respectability & legitimacy. Don't ask me why, but they obviously do.

Duh. What was I thinking? Confused Rolling Eyes
(I put it down to the euphoria & the lateness of the hour ...)
It's the sanctions, of course.
They want respectability & legitimacy so the sanctions will be removed!
(of course, many have argued that the sanctions made the lives of the Burmese people much harder & have had little impact on the junta.)
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8195956.stm
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Nov, 2010 06:37 pm
@msolga,
So (I guess) here's the generals' recipe for "respectability":

Hold a (sham) election (which they are guaranteed to win, of course) & free Aung San Suu Kyi from detention.
Hey presto, democracy restored!
That removes the 2 sticking points, so the sanctions should now be removed, right? Neutral

Not quite.
(though I'm by no means of the opinion that the sanctions imposed by western countries have achieved much, or anything at all, for the extremely impoverished Burmese people .. quite possibly they've made their lives a lot tougher.)

There are something like two thousand plus political prisoners still being held in detention centres in Burma .. there are opponents of the junta who were ruled "ineligible" to stand for election, the constitution of the country ensures a victory to the junta in elections ... & there's so much else to be addressed ..

So it will be interesting to see how western nations respond to these new circumstances. Continue with the sanctions or not?
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  2  
Reply Sun 14 Nov, 2010 08:50 pm
Quote:
Suu Kyi open to talks with junta
By South East Asia correspondent Zoe Daniel
Updated 4 hours 55 minutes ago
http://www.abc.net.au/reslib/201011/r673168_4913706.jpg
Working towards reconciliation: Aung San Suu Kyi after her release at the weekend (Reuters: Soe Zeya Tun)
Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi has left her home for the first time in seven years and stepped straight back into controversy.
The Nobel Laureate and democracy campaigner was officially set free on Saturday night after spending 15 of the past 21 years under house arrest.

In her first outing she spoke to her supporters, who have been turning out in large numbers to greet her, and urged them not to lose hope for Burma.

Ms Suu Kyi says she will work towards reconciliation and that she is open to talks with anyone - including the country's military junta.


"We all have to work together and that unity is strength and we've got to find new ways and we have got to make our movement wider," she told the ABC.

"We have broadened our movement and we've got to find new people and new ways to support our dream.

"We would like to engage with the military junta. We would like to engage with everybody who we think would help the democratic process."

She says she wants to talk to leaders in other countries about what they think they can do to help bring democracy to Burma.


"I would like to talk to them. I would like to see how they think they can support us. I think there has to be an exchange," she said.

"I have just come out of house arrest after six years and I don't just want to go around and tell people you do this and you do that, we want this and we want that.

"I would like to have a genuine exchange to find out what we can do to help each other."

Ms Suu Kyi says she is open to talks with other countries about easing sanctions on Burma, which she says hurt the Burmese people more than the junta.

Ms Suu Kyi has also thanked Australia for its support.

"My very warmest thanks to the people of Australia for all that they have done for us," she said.

Ms Suu Kyi says she is saddened by how little has changed politically in Burma since her detention.

"I noticed today how poor a lot of our people are and I was very touched by the fact that in spite of their obvious difficulties, the hardships that they have to face, they were so warm in their welcome and so enthusiastic," she said.

She says it is too early to tell how the recent elections, which have been widely condemned as a sham, will impact Burma.

"At the moment I don't see any change at all. I am not sure whether things are better or things are worse. I think we have got to wait for a little bit to find out," she said.

Assassination threat

While her release has brought a rare moment of joy to Burma, Ms Suu Kyi will now be at high risk of re-arrest because she remains an obvious threat to the power of the junta.

Dr Muang Zarni, an exiled dissident and research fellow on Burma at the London School of Economics, says the junta fears what Ms Suu Kyi represents.

"It is not that they fear this single woman but they fear what she has come to embody which is the popular desire for anti-dictatorship government, popular desire for freedom and justice," he said.


"So as long as she embodies that popular aspiration and concretely popular support, she is going to remain a major challenge."

Before Ms Suu Kyi was re-arrested in 2003 her convoy was attacked in what was widely interpreted as an attempt on her life.

Dr Zarni says there is a high risk of that happening again.

"Next time around when she becomes a major headache, a major thorn in their side, again despite the fact that they have monopoly control over formal political processing, then I think there is a possibility that they will assassinate her," he said.

"That is my greatest fear. She needs to preserve herself if she wants to be useful for the Burmese public and for the Burmese opposition movement."...<cont>


http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/11/15/3066010.htm
 

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