15
   

Should obese people have to pay for an extra airplane seat?

 
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 11:52 am
@High Seas,
Wow reading this makes me think it would encourage obesity. I do like the fact they would require a medical certificate, but what would happen if a doctor wrote one for some one that didn't really require two seats?

And the other thing reading further in the article it states "people who are "functionally disabled by obesity" deserve to have two seats for one fare. " So it is not because they are obese due to a medical condition - they have a medical condition because they ar obese. Again this is rewarding behavior that you caused.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 11:56 am
I hadn't realized what a hot topic this was - on my way home last night I channel surfed and found two radio stations having this very discussion. One woman called in and stated she was a heavy set woman. That when she traveled with a friend, they would buy three seats to share for the two of them.

Another called in to say she got seated in the middle of a couple that were extremely obese. They obviously reserved the aisle and window seat hoping no one would occupy the middle seat - as luck would have it the entire plane was sold out. She was forced to sit between them (as they wouldn't move next to each other) and to make matters worse held a conversation during an entire red eye flight.
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 12:08 pm
@Linkat,
It's been a hot topic in pilot circles for years. Consensus is safety must trump political correctness.

Right now 2/3 of our population is either overweight or obese, but the laws of aerodynamics haven't changed, plus fuel costs have gone through the roof; here's an old article about Southwest, a pioneer in low-cost flight:
Quote:
Southwest's "passengers of size" policy is not new. It actually dates back to 1980........But Southwest's slim-line passengers are now revolting. The airline says 90% of the letters it receives on the issue were from passengers complaining that they were "sat upon" by people overflowing from their seat. ...........Eight years ago, a passenger sued Southwest after being forced to buy a second seat, but in court the case was dismissed.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/2055586.stm
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 12:22 pm
@High Seas,
I also heard on the radio that it said United brought this up again because of receiving so many complaints because of the discomfort when seated next to an obese person.

I also thought about it - if this happened to me - especially the poor woman seated between two large individuals - I think I would have written a complaint as well (at least now I know I would).
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 12:33 pm
@Linkat,
I probably would have demanded to be seated someplace else citing medical
conditions no one ever heard of. Airlines have done what they've done for so
long because passengers rarely complain on the spot. Letters after the fact are
- in my opinion, pretty much useless.
hamburger
 
  2  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 12:44 pm
@CalamityJane,
cj wrote :

Quote:
I probably would have demanded to be seated someplace else citing medical
conditions no one ever heard of. Airlines have done what they've done for so
long because passengers rarely complain on the spot. Letters after the fact are
- in my opinion, pretty much useless.


you better be VERY careful , cj .
passengers that do not OBEY aircrew demands cannot only be removed from the plane , they are at times even arrested .
the airlines declare it as : unruly behaviour likely to interfere with the safety of the flight/crew/other passengers .
it seems to happen more frequently .
on our flight back from vienna to toronto , one of the passengers was just slightly inebritated . even though he caused no trouble at all and there were no passenger complaints , the captain had him removed at a stopover in berlin .
and shorthly thereafter the bar was opened - i guess they didn't like him to "bring his own drink " .
hbg
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 01:05 pm
@CalamityJane,
I'd complain then too - not sure if this woman did - she may have as she said that the plane was full so I would guess she asked to be moved.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 01:18 pm
@High Seas,
As I had already stated as long as airlines /FAA allow parents to had young children in their laps no "safety" issue concerning too small seats and fat passengers should be allow to "fly".
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 02:26 pm
@Linkat,
Linkat wrote:

I wouldn't have a problem with being weighed - as financially me and my family would benefit. But is it really fair that a child using the same space as an adult pay less for example? If a 45 pound child ended up only paying $50 while a 135 pound adult paid $150 and took up the same space, is that fair? They both take one seat - the airline then would lose money when children fly vs. an adult.

But the child does not take the same space as an adult, nor do they require the same fuel to lift. Heck, their suitcases are probably smaller as well or in the case of my children, they just pack their clothing in my suitcase. At the same time, they require the same support from flight attendants and airport personnel and they do tahe up a certain minimum space. It seems to me the solution is to price tickets with a fixed and a variable portion. For a ticket you pay $X plus $Y/pound. However, if I'm a heavier person and I pay extra, I should expect to get a bigger seat because of it.
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 02:37 pm
@engineer,
I travel with kids and depending on their age they have as much crap and more as an adult. A baby for instance can fly free in lap, but you typically have a stroller and car seat (which does not count as luggage), then diapers, and all sorts of crap.

For a toddler you bring all sorts of toys, videos, etc. to entertain them. The clothes though is much smaller.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 02:38 pm
@engineer,
There is no history/business model that I am aware of that allow humans to be bill in the same manner as cargo by weight or size and surely no such model for a license common carrier.

The whole idea is silly beyond beliefs.
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 02:43 pm
@BillRM,
I remember a restaurant that used you charge children by their weight. Although this was supposed to be a marketing thing. I did hear that some kids that were heavier hated this.
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 02:44 pm
@hamburger,
Hamburger, they would not be able to remove me from the plane if I complain of lack of space and citing my medical conditions, giving them reason to seat
me someplace else. They'd know that this would be a huge liability on their
part.
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 02:54 pm
@Linkat,
Linkat wrote:

I travel with kids and depending on their age they have as much crap and more as an adult. A baby for instance can fly free in lap, but you typically have a stroller and car seat (which does not count as luggage), then diapers, and all sorts of crap.

For a toddler you bring all sorts of toys, videos, etc. to entertain them. The clothes though is much smaller.

Then let's charge the daylights out of the little buggers!

So to continue my train of thought, Engineering Airlines would have seats of varying sizes, say a large, standard and slim, with limited numbers of large and slims available. If you buy a standard and you can't fit into it, then either you have to pay for a large upgrade or if none is available, you stay home. Nice price cuts available to the thin folks to. I might make those child seats. You still pay for luggage by weight.
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 03:19 pm
@engineer,
I am smaller than many children - can I buy a child's seat?
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 03:37 pm
@engineer,
I like that idea! Insurances also charge a higher premium for obese people and smokers, so why not airlines too? Larger seat translates to larger share of cost.
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 03:48 pm
@CalamityJane,
cj : you may want to have a look at this article . wouldn't want you to say later :
"but why didn't anytime tell me ! " .
(not being familiar with the law is no excuse Shocked )

http://justfixit.uniontrib.com/uniontrib/20070920/news_lz1e20sterns.html
from the article :

Quote:
Coffee, tea or handcuffs?
The flight attendant simply walks to the interphone, rings the captain (who being locked in the compartment up front has no idea of what is going on), and conveys they are “uncomfortable” with a passenger. The attendant could claim the passenger is or may be presenting a problem. Only the perception of the flight attendant matters. Whatever the problem, all the attendant need say is Passenger X may “interfere” with their duties or otherwise pose a problem to the orderly progress of the flight. Nothing about “terrorism” overt signs of trouble, or words used.

The captain then exercises “discretion,” to remove the passenger. Removal can either be the “easy way” or the “hard way.” In one case the airline called four burly airport police or immigration officers to remove a passenger not only in handcuffs, but after the passenger was thrown to the floor and pinned.

If a handcuffee decides the removal was unjustified and unreasonable, and attempts recourse through the legal system, he or she will be met with an airline defense of a number of court-decided cases that hold, interestingly enough:

The statute gives the carrier power to deplane the passenger in certain circumstances;

that authority is delegated to the captain of the flight;

who, in turn, makes the decision;

which rests entirely on what the flight attendant has reported, without verification;

because flight attendants are the “eyes and ears” of the captain (exact words from a court ruling); and

whether the flight attendant's report is true or false, or false because malicious, is irrelevant. No judicial inquiry is permitted into these issues.

Ergo, end of case. No recourse, including if the passenger demonstrates through many witnesses that the flight attendant overreacted.


this is only one of several other cases reported in the news .

i'm sure you know what the italians are saying :
"YOU KEEPA YOUR BIG MOUTH SHUT ! " .

see ya in court (you know any BIG lawyers doing "pro bono cases" ? )
hbg
0 Replies
 
NickFun
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 07:34 pm
I recall riding the trains in Japan and it astounded me as to how small the seats were. They were made for little Japanese asses. Surely when the Japanese sell those trains to America they make the seats bigger to accommodate our much larger asses!
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 07:42 pm
@Linkat,
Linkat wrote:

I am smaller than many children - can I buy a child's seat?

Absolutely. I would put the slims next to a standard for your husband. The downside (or upside) would be that the slims would be aisle seats. 20% off for slims and a 20% premium for larges to start.
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 11:13 pm
http://www.airlinequality.com/
On this link you can get tips about the best seats in an airplane.
0 Replies
 
 

 
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