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Nine Sci-Fi Books That Deserve To Be Films

 
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 09:03 am
So little of "science fiction" actually has plausible reference to science that it ought to be called fantasy--perhaps future fantasy would be a more realistic term. That is probably what makes it so appealing to both authors and readers, and accounts for the propensity of writers to air both their grievances and their wishes in moralizing homilies within the genre. For sake of balance, i would not that leftwingnuts are as likely to sermonize in their sci-fi works as are rightwingnuts. It's a genre which is attractive to those who want a bully pulpit.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 09:23 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
I referred to Card as a one novel author because he wrote one novel, Ender's Game, for which he became well-known, it was of modest quality at best,

If I remember correctly, it was originally a short story or novella, which he expanded to novel length (to exploit the financial benefits).

I quite liked the shorter form, but couldn't get through the novel. (Partly because I already knew the conclusion.)



IMO, some of the best print-to-big screen transitions come from graphic novels/comic books. The Matrix was visualized as a comic book, if I remember correctly.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 09:26 am
@fbaezer,
IMO, the theme in Ubik has been done. Several times, in fact.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 09:29 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

So little of "science fiction" actually has plausible reference to science that it ought to be called fantasy--perhaps future fantasy would be a more realistic term. That is probably what makes it so appealing to both authors and readers, and accounts for the propensity of writers to air both their grievances and their wishes in moralizing homilies within the genre. For sake of balance, i would not that leftwingnuts are as likely to sermonize in their sci-fi works as are rightwingnuts. It's a genre which is attractive to those who want a bully pulpit.


That's what Star Wars is - science fantasy.

Cycloptichorn
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 09:47 am
@Cycloptichorn,
Yup. "Rescue the princess and kill the dragon" set in a space opera.
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 09:50 am
@DrewDad,
DrewDad wrote:

Yup. "Rescue the princess and kill the dragon" set in a space opera.


With swords no less!

Cycloptichorn
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 10:05 am
@Cycloptichorn,
And evil sorcerers.

Science Fiction rocks!
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 10:12 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
So little of "science fiction" actually has plausible reference to science that it ought to be called fantasy--perhaps future fantasy would be a more realistic term.

That's the main reason I pretty much quit reading science fiction and fantasy around the time I finished high school. (I had been binging on both genres as a teenager.) Science fiction, like all fiction, is ultimately limited by people's capacity to make stuff up. Reality itself, on the other hand, has no such constraint. Accordingly, as I took advanced science classes in high school, I found that the real world is stranger, more fascinating, and fuller of mind-boggling details than fiction is. So I concluded that science non-fiction was my thing, and that science fiction couldn't really compete with it. One major project in my current sabbatical is to figure out if this conclusion was a mistake.
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 10:13 am
@Thomas,
Thomas wrote:

Setanta wrote:
So little of "science fiction" actually has plausible reference to science that it ought to be called fantasy--perhaps future fantasy would be a more realistic term.

That's the main reason I pretty much quit reading science fiction and fantasy around the time I finished high school. (I had been binging on both genres as a teenager.) Science fiction, like all fiction, is ultimately limited by people's capacity to make stuff up. Reality itself has no such constraint. Accordingly, as I took advanced science classes in high school, I found that the real world is stranger, more fascinating, and fuller of mind-boggling details than fiction is. So I concluded that science non-fiction was my thing, and that science fiction couldn't really compete with it. One major project in my current sabbatical is to figure out if this conclusion was a mistake.


Try reading some books by Ian m. Banks if you want some pretty good evidence you were wrong, Thomas.

Cycloptichorn
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 10:22 am
@Cycloptichorn,
Thanks for the tip -- I will. My current plan is to take my own advice I gave years ago in Noddy's science fiction thread, and read the last decade of Hugo winners. I'm sure the approach is not perfect, but it should be a reasonably good proxy for what the science fiction community at large considers good literature.

But I'm sure that will leave enough empty slots in my reading list. What Ian M. Banks novel do you think I should start with?
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 10:24 am
@Thomas,
Thomas wrote:

Thanks for the tip -- I will. My current plan is to take my own advice I gave years ago in Noddy's science fiction thread, and read the last decade of Hugo winners. I'm sure the approach is not perfect, but it should be a reasonably good proxy for what the science fiction community at large considers good literature.

But I'm sure that will leave enough empty slots in my reading list. What Ian M. Banks novel do you think I should start with?


Excession. Humanity more than 20k years into the future, plenty of aliens, Computer minds, extra-dimensional forces, and more weird and unique ideas that I never would have thought of. Excellent writing, and if you like that one, there are about 8 more set in the same 'universe.'

Cycloptichorn
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 10:36 am
@Cycloptichorn,
Thanks again!

By the way -- after we met almost two years ago, I bought Asimov's Complete Robot, read Evidence, and still didn't find the original quote that you said Douglas Adams copied: "Those who most want to govern are, ipso facto, the least suited to do it. [...] [A]nyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job." I see the idea of the quote, kind of hovering above the story, but I see nothing remotely similar to the quote itself. Am I overlooking something?
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 10:40 am
@Thomas,
Thomas wrote:

Thanks again!

By the way -- after we met almost two years ago, I bought Asimov's Complete Robot, read Evidence, and still didn't find the original quote that you said Douglas Adams copied: "Those who most want to govern are, ipso facto, the least suited to do it. [...] [A]nyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job." I see the idea of the quote, kind of hovering above the story, but I see nothing remotely similar to the quote itself. Am I overlooking something?


It's possible that I referenced the wrong work. Let me double-check. Hopefully you found the purchase satisfying nonetheless.

Cycloptichorn
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 10:55 am
@DrewDad,
Quote:
IMO, some of the best print-to-big screen transitions come from graphic novels/comic books.


I agree, and would add that much of sci-fi which does well on the big screen because it benefits from being put into a comic-book-like story board, with all the cheap moralizing and philosophizing pitched over the side.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 10:57 am
@Cycloptichorn,
I thought that came in a short story he did circa the late 1940s or the early 1950s . . . i'm pretty sure you once quoted and linked it.
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 01:47 pm
@Setanta,
He did. That short story was "Evidence", published 1946. The full text is not available online. Cycloptichorn linked, I think, to Wikipedia's summary of it.
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 01:49 pm
@Thomas,
Thomas wrote:

He did. That short story was "Evidence", published 1946. The full text is not available online. Cycloptichorn linked, I think, to Wikipedia's summary of it.


Man, I know I read Asimov write that very phrase! I'll keep at it.

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Mar, 2009 12:35 pm
@Thomas,
Oooooh, speak of the devil: Just as the mail is delivering the Yiddish Policemen's Union (Hugo for best novel 2008), I learn that someone thinks it deserves to be a film. And that "somebody" happens to be none less than ..... The Cohen Brothers!

This is going to be interesting.
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Mar, 2009 01:40 pm
It struck me last night (prolly in the shower where I do my RAM thinking) that Greg Bear's Darwin's Radio (and Darwin's Children) would make a good movie or mini-series. I was searching for a synopsis to post when I saw that there had been some move by the SciFi channel to do a mini series, but that they canned the idea.

http://www.sfsite.com/02a/dar121.htm
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Mar, 2009 10:18 pm
@Setanta,
All well and good that you pronounce Card to be a lousy writer but you offer nothing more than such pronouncement as Setanta Fact

Yes, it is your opinion and that's fine if you desire to do no more than press an ink stamp on an A2K thread. Perhaps you might be more specific, but I doubt your are capable of doing so without cutting and pasting from Wikipedia.

Who introduced politics into this thread?

And yet you have the temerity to suggest that I am somehow compelled by obsession to do so. Classic Setanta.

You have little regard for the awards Card has recieved, because they don't comport with your opinion. Fine. And if you don't think that Ted Williams belongs in the Baseball Hall of Fame then we can conclude that you have little regard for that honor. Incredibly egotistical, but hey --- it's your opinion

Your opinions about literature of any genre are simplistic, unsubstantiated and laughable, but you're right, they are yours.

How many of Card's novels have you actually read?


 

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