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How do you become a university lecturer?

 
 
Reply Sun 9 Nov, 2008 02:09 pm
I feel pretty stupid for asking this on here, but I don't want to ask anyone in REAL life as I'm assuming that would be worse.
I guess you have to have gone to Oxford and come out with a 1st class degree.
I'm not at Oxford, but I got a scholarship to a good arts university. I've been thinking about it for a long while, and I can't imagine a time in my life when I want to ever stop learning or come out of an academic enviroment, so it follows that lecturing would be my dream job.... but it appears to be quite an illusive one......
Ideally the plan would be to transfer my music degree and get an ma in culture studies, then work and travel and gain a few more life experiences under my belt, then maybe do my phd when I get to about thirty and get into lecturing after that.....
pq x
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Type: Question • Score: 3 • Views: 6,347 • Replies: 8
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dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Nov, 2008 02:21 pm
@The Pentacle Queen,
Lecturer?

Well, here, you have to go to a university, get a good degree, a good Masters, and be working towards your Phd.

They often let you tutor during that process....you ought also be looking to get papers published.

Then, when you have a good Phd, they may let you do some sessional lectures while you publish more.

Often, you spend years on various contracts while you do as much research and publish as much as you can.

Sometimes you get a offered permanant lectureship after a while.
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Shapeless
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Nov, 2008 02:25 pm
@The Pentacle Queen,
Do "lectureships" mean the same thing in the UK that they mean in the States? In the States, a lectureship is usually a non-tenure-track faculty position, often akin to adjunct faculty. You teach, but your employment is generally not contingent on producing scholarly work outside of your teaching duties (though you're free to do so). Many music lectureships in the States require only a Master's degree.

In the States, the application for lectureship positions is similar to full-time faculty positions, more or less: they ask for a c.v. and, sometimes, a teaching portfolio of some kind (a summary of classes you've taught before, a general statement of your teaching philosophy, sample or prospective syllabi, etc.).
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Shapeless
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Nov, 2008 02:35 pm
@The Pentacle Queen,
Quote:
I feel pretty stupid for asking this on here, but I don't want to ask anyone in REAL life as I'm assuming that would be worse.


I would also add that you should definitely NOT feel reluctant to ask a real-life academic! Unless the academics around you are monsters (which is entirely possible, I suppose), most of them will understand where you're coming from. If they have any sense of responsibility, many of them will be only too glad to inform (read: warn) you of the steps it will take to get an academic position and the general satisfaction you can expect to get (or not) from your efforts. (My apologies if I'm sounding cynical about it. Wink )
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Nov, 2008 02:40 pm
@The Pentacle Queen,
Wikipedia gives you some hints.

The situation in Germany is (was*) very similar as it is (was*) in the UK.
*see the wiki-report.

I've been a 'lecturer' at a 'university of applied sciences' for some years, teaching "Methods of Social Work, Praxis"
Without a PhD, but since I've got other degrees to social work, had published a bit, they accepted me. (Actually, they asked me to come. And since they were short on professors, I even became an "Acting Assistant Professor" - a title without substance = a lot less paid the regulars.)

[Did that parttime only.]
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talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Nov, 2008 08:19 pm
@The Pentacle Queen,
Or become famous by writing hit songs and music like Paul McCartney and Bob Dylan and obtain honorary doctor degrees from Harvard University and go on from there.
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The Pentacle Queen
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Mar, 2009 04:57 am
Paul McCartney got a degree from HARVARD? That takes the piss.

Hmmm. Anyway, I'm updating this message, because yesterday I had a chat my aesthetics lecturer, and ended up spending an hour in his office (which was quite a privilege in itself, since most of them are so illusive) anyway, we got talking about what i wanted to do, and I sheepishly admitted lecturer, but said 6th form college to cover it up a bit. Anyway, what he said ******* knocked me out- he said I was better than that and that I should go for it, and a whole load of other really nice ******* statements that went on for ages and by the time I left I was almost crying.
So, ******* booyah. Job sorted Wink
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Matthew Morrissey
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Jul, 2009 05:15 pm
Hi! I'm a 17 guy going into his Senior year of high school. I always wanted to teach and I find Philosophy most interesting. And if its not obvious by the philosophy, I'm atheist. Anyway, I may want to work out a life goal as becoming a Philosophy teacher at a university or college. How would I go about doing that? What are the requirements and such?
The Pentacle Queen
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Jul, 2009 09:52 am
@Matthew Morrissey,
Quote:
And if its not obvious by the philosophy, I'm atheist


Why are the two mutually exclusive?
0 Replies
 
 

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