4
   

Middle School Mini-Debate

 
 
littlek
 
Reply Wed 8 Oct, 2008 08:56 pm
The kids I work with are listening to the debates (or listening to people talk about the debates). One student asked his SS teacher to let them do a campaign and hold debates (in many many more words than THAT! Blahblahblah.... but really well thought out). I don't know if the teacher is planning on doing this or not. But, I wanted to do a little something around the elections. The problem is that I am not a teacher, I'm supportstaff. So, if I were to do something with them, it'd have to be very short and sweet and concise so I don't take up too much time. Maybe just getting into the details of what debates are all about (the rules, the structure, the evidence!) will be enough to dissuade them while also teaching them something about it.

I really have no experience with debate either. I've been looking for basic tenets of debate and debate rules online. I am interested more in the rules of good behavior and thoroughness of research than in scheduling details like answer and response formats.

Does anyone have any suggestions, help, info or other ideas?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 4 • Views: 4,224 • Replies: 5
No top replies

 
cicerone imposter
 
  0  
Reply Wed 8 Oct, 2008 09:00 pm
@littlek,
Depending on the topic of the debate, I would think that you would need a "factchecker" to make sure what they say is factual or true.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Oct, 2008 09:01 pm
@littlek,
I have no advice at all but I think your idea is cool.

It reminds me of my 7th grade civics teacher, Mr. Alexandar, who taught us how to vote and fill out an income tax return and made us read the Constitution while ranting about Watergate.

The only class I had in Jr. High worth remembering.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Oct, 2008 09:03 pm
@littlek,
Have they had any experience with general rules of meetings? Roberts Rules of Order, that sort of thing?
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Oct, 2008 09:21 pm
No topics have been discussed and they don't have a clue as to debate rules. I want them to understand that arguing doesn't mean being rude or interrupting others.

I was thinking about a thread that runs through school, town and country - like kids' rights.
0 Replies
 
Foxfyre
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Oct, 2008 09:34 pm
@littlek,
When working with beginners, keep it as simple as possible
and don't impose a great many rules.

Will they be debating as individuals or in teams?

Essentially the basics are that each side is presented with the
thesis that they are to prove or disprove. The students
should know in advance whether they are arguing for or
against a proposition. Example: Resolved: The two party
system is the best political system for the United States of America
or something like that. (I would strongly recommend that the
proposition not be strongly partisan.)


Or each team could be arguing in
defense of a particular political position: i.e. One side
takes Obama's tax plan; One side takes McCain's tax plan
and tries to make the best possible case for their assigned plan.
(Even getting this partisan, however, might evoke some
criticism from outside.)

If you are going with format in which one side attempts to
prove and the other side attempts to disprove, it would go
something like:

The sides flip a coin to see who goes first.

The speakers are introduced and they greet each other and exchange
hand shakes. The first speaker on each side will thank the
moderator and anybody else who should be thanked for
hosting the debate.

1. First pro speaker - makes his/her best case for the resolution. 5 minutes
2. First con speaker - makes his/her best case to rebut the points of the
first speaker and does so as much as possible with
good information why the proposition is false. 5 min
3. Second pro speaker - makes second argument rebutting speaker - adding
information as necessary.
4. Second con speaker - makes second argument rebutting speaker 3 -
adding information as necessary.

And so forth. (Of course if there is only one speaker on each side, the pro and con will speak more than once.) Time limits for each speaker should be strictly enforced. Usually two or three arguments per side is sufficient for a first debate.

Rules should be firmly established with points deducted for any infractions:
1. It's okay to make up stuff but if you get caught, the other side gets a point.
2. The debaters can address the moderator or their opponent, but they are not allowed to use any insulting language or ad hominem no matter how mild. It is permissable to say something like "To say that such and such is so is absurd because. . . . " and then present material to show why it is."

It is important to stress to the kids that they are not trying to beat each other but they are attempting to defend or defeat an opinion or idea. In order to do that they must come up with a superior opinion or idea. It teaches them to learn how to articulate a point of view without insulting the other person and there is no better way to do that than to teach them how to argue both sides of the question.

Great training though and if you make it fun, they might become interested in exploring more formal debate which of course is far more involved and complicated with a whole lot more technique and terminology to learn.

Anyhow for what its worth, this is pretty much the basics of how I have started out young-uns. It allows a lot of flexibility to design your own format for what you want to do. Just keep it simple and keep it fun.

Foxfyre (old debate coach & judge)

0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Kid wouldn't fight, died of injuries - Discussion by gungasnake
Weed Out Individualism at an Early Age - Discussion by gungasnake
Public school zero tolerance policies. - Question by boomerang
Dismantling the DC voucher program - Discussion by gungasnake
Adventures in Special Education - Discussion by littlek
home schooling - Discussion by dancerdoll
Can I get into an Ivy League? - Question by the-lazy-snail
Let's start an education forum - Discussion by cicerone imposter
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Middle School Mini-Debate
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 07/03/2020 at 06:09:25