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Salty Dog

 
 
conda
 
Reply Fri 16 Sep, 2005 03:49 pm
Bluegrass music fans: "Let me be your Salty Dog"...

What is a salty dog anyway? Where did the term come from?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 3 • Views: 18,695 • Replies: 29
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djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Sep, 2005 05:44 pm
according to wikipedia

'Salty Dog' also has an older sexual meaning in US folklore and song. See, for example, the traditional song 'Salty Dog Blues' (where the lyric "let me be your salty dog" translates to let me be your sexual partner). It also means ornery, as in the T-Bone Walker tune "Ain't Salty No More."

Does anyone know its derivation? It seems to carry a range of connotations from 'male cuckold' to 'stud'

The term comes from the term "sea dog," or a horny sailer.
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panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Sep, 2005 08:04 am
All hands on deck, we've run afloat!' I heard the captain cry
'Explore the ship, replace the cook: let no one leave alive!'
Across the straits, around the Horn: how far can sailors fly?
A twisted path, our tortured course, and no one left alive
We sailed for parts unknown to man, where ships come home to die
No lofty peak, nor fortress bold, could match our captain's eye
Upon the seventh seasick day we made our port of call
A sand so white, and sea so blue, no mortal place at all
We fired the gun, and burnt the mast, and rowed from ship to shore
The captain cried, we sailors wept: our tears were tears of joy
Now many moons and many Junes have passed since we made land
A salty dog, this seaman's log: your witness my own hand
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panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Sep, 2005 08:11 am
just a favorite song...carry on
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Sep, 2005 08:31 am
panz is on the right way - as usual:

- an "old salt" is an older sailor with a lifetime of experience aboard ship, well-versed in the skills of seamanship and often also described as "crusty" (which is usually just a euphemism for "cranky").

"Salt" has been used as a synonym for "experienced sailor" since the mid-1800s by allusion to salt water and the salt spray which covers everything aboard ship.
http://www.cooltoons2.com/newsletter/2004/newsletter124/popeye.jpg
- "Salty dog" means essentially the same thing as "old salt," a veteran and often aging sailor.
"Salty dog" is probably based on another term, "sea dog," again meaning a sailor with years of experience. The term "sea-dog," btw, originally was applied to the seals sailors often encountered.





Of course, don't confuse that with "The Original Salty Dogs", a dixieland revival band, founded in 1947 at Purdue University in West Lafayette, IN. (Named after the Salty Dog Rag/Blues) :wink:
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Sep, 2005 07:32 am
Bravo Walter Mr Erudition.

Flatt and Scruggs did the ultimate version in 1947
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dagmaraka
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Sep, 2005 07:36 am
ok, but why would anyone want to be anyone's veteran sailor? hmmm, the sexual connotation seems to make more sense in this context, no? perhaps it has both meanings.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Sep, 2005 07:57 am
Perhaps :wink:

Quote:
During the recording session in Rock Hill, South Carolina, the Morris Brothers recorded the song that was their all time hit-"Let Me Be Your Salty Dog." The song was written by Zeke in 1935, but both brothers arranged it. Wiley explained that "I have a different definition of a salty dog than Zeke has. Back when we were kids down in Old Fort we would see a girl we liked and say "I'd like to be her salty dog." There also used to be a drink you could get up in Michigan. All you had to do was say "Let me have a Salty Dog," and they'd pour you one." Zeke remembers that "I got the idea when we went to a little old honky tonk just outside of Canton which is in North Carolina. We went to play at a school out beyond Waynesville somewhere and we stopped at this place. They sold beer and had slot machines. At that time they were legal in North Carolina. We got in there after the show and got to drinking that beer and playing the slot machines with nickels, dimes and quarters. I think we hit three or four jackpots. Boy, here it would come! You know you had a pile of money when you had two handfuls of change. The name of that place was the "Salty Dog," and that's where I got the idea for the song. There's actually more verses to it than me and Wiley sing, a lot more verses." There is little doubt that "Salty Dog" is the most popular number the Morris Brothers ever recorded. According to Wiley, "It's considered a standard. Everybody uses it in the bluegrass field, just about. We're making more money off it now on copyright royalties than we ever did on our record, with other people using it. I reckon that song is known all over the world. When I get my statement every six months, it's being played in every nation under the sun. That song is even popular in Japan! 'Salty Dog' aint one that's gone up to high heaven and then fell completely down. It's just one that's considered a standard. It's our biggest song 'cause it's a good five string banjo number played bluegrass style."
source: Blue Grass (via wayback maschine)
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panzade
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Sep, 2005 07:59 am
fascinating. I have the Morris Brothers recording but didn't know the background.
sehr gutt
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Sep, 2005 08:05 am
Well, but you did know that the Morris brothers are the composers?
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Sep, 2005 08:08 am
The jazz title "Salty Dog" was composed by 'Papa Charlie Jackson' in 1925; "Salty Dog Rag" by John Gordy & Edward Crowe in 1951 (sic!).
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Bob Lablob
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Oct, 2005 07:34 am
Walter, have you checked out Mississippi John Hurt's work? His recordings on the Vanguard label are mind blowing. This guy has a wonderful story and his music has to heard to be believed. He has a killer version of Salty Dog from his immortal 1965 live recording.

http://www.mindspring.com/~dennist/

http://www.mindspring.com/~dennist/HURT.GIF
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Oct, 2005 07:39 am
No, since I'm not thaaat fan of this kind of music.
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Bob Lablob
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Oct, 2005 07:48 am
Sorry.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Oct, 2005 07:58 am
No need to be sorry about that - other music (jazz) is fine as well :wink:
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panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Oct, 2005 11:06 am
Bob Lablob wrote:
Walter, have you checked out Mississippi John Hurt's work? His recordings on the Vanguard label are mind blowing. This guy has a wonderful story and his music has to heard to be believed.


So true. Hurt had a sophisticated finger picking style that I spent eons learning. He was a real original
0 Replies
 
babsatamelia
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Oct, 2005 11:21 am
I really like some of Mississippi John Hurt's stuff. I would
not necessarily describe it as 'jazz' - rather more like the
old, ancient blues. He and Leadbelly are both kind of the
old, ancient blues types, don't you think? Funky, but he
was a really talented man.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Oct, 2005 11:33 am
Nine Pound Hammer, Coffee Blues, Payday. These songs
are closer to the Piedmont blues style than the Delta Blues.
0 Replies
 
babsatamelia
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Oct, 2005 12:01 pm
You don't say. I truly AM impressed if you can pick like John
Hurt. I never even knew he existed until 3 or 4 years ago as
I was downloading music, chatting with a fellow music lover
who suggested that I give a listen to some of these old guys.
So ... tell me. What's the major difference? Aside from where
they came from, what is the difference in their style or form,
and is one older than the other?
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Oct, 2005 12:03 pm
babsatamelia-

Hi! I have not seen hide nor hair of you in many a moon. Hope that all is well with you!
0 Replies
 
 

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