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Ellipsis in linguistics

 
 
alinal
 
Reply Sat 28 Apr, 2012 06:14 pm
Hello,


need information about ellipsis (in linguistics).

Do the omissions of
[a subject and the part of predicate; see example (1)]
or
[a subject and a predicate; see example (2)]
or
[the verb's form 'to be'; see example (3)] belong to ellipsis?

E.g.
(1) > Need extra space?
(2) > Swing time.
(3) Late licence > revoked.

Besides, another question is: how to indicate when smth is missing? I mean what mark should be written. I wrote '>', but I think that omissions aren't signed by this mark.

Thank u.
 
jespah
 
  3  
Reply Sun 29 Apr, 2012 06:30 am
@alinal,
Don't use >. It's a symbol for greater than in mathematics or is used for HTML code. It isn't used for grammar at all, so far as I'm aware.

Use ...

That ^ is an ellipsis.

An ellipsis is used for omissions, or, in dialogue, for showing that a sentence is not finished, e. g. Mary said, "I think ..."

It doesn't matter what you're omitting. It's always the same ellipsis. The rule does not change.
alinal
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 Apr, 2012 05:22 pm
@jespah,
Mary said, "I think ...",

but I think this is already preterition or no?

Besides, thank u Smile
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Apr, 2012 06:42 am
@alinal,
I have no idea what "preterition" is supposed to be.

You're welcome. Smile
0 Replies
 
alinal
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 May, 2012 12:10 pm
@alinal,
Aposiopesis?

Maybe now a bit clearer Smile what I meant.
0 Replies
 
 

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