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Solving a grammatical test

 
 
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2021 03:33 am
Hello, just failed in some English grammar test here and I would like get some assistance from an English expert, giving me an explanation of the same if you don't mind kindly.

1. Mark, who won, went on ----- in the 1998 final.
a)having won
b)winning
c)to win
d)to have won

2. Providing that he ---- hard, she'll pass the exam.
a)she studies
b)she'll be studying
c)she'll study
d)she is studying

3. They all tried hard, but with ---- success.
a)a few
b)few
c)a little
d)little

4. Nobody's disagreed to stay, ----?
a) has he
b) did he
c)have they
d) are they

5. It's high time you ---- some work!
a) do
b) did
c) have done
d) would do

7. If all the hotels are full, you ---- phone this number.
a) would rather
b) had better
c) would better
d) had rather

8.He ---- eaten something before going to school.
a) had to
b) must
c) should
d) ought to have

9.He didn't look when crossing the road.He ---- in hurry.
a) had to be
b) should have been
c) might to be
d) must have been

10. Would you mind ---- me $5?
a) going to lend
b) lending
c) lent
d) to lend

11. I'm thinking ---- away next Sunday.
a) I go
b) for going
c) to go
d) of going

12. I've rung the bell but there is no answer. He --- in bed.
a) must be
b) can be
c) will be
d) needs to be

13. By the next year he ---- his exams.
a) had passed
b) has passed
c) will pass
d) will have passed.

14. You ---- your homework before you came to the lesson.
a) should be doing
b) should be done
c)should have done
d) should do

15. If he --- the car immediately, the accident wouldn't have happened.
a) would stop
b) would have stopped
c) stopped
d) had stopped

16. When he ---- finished the exam, he'll speak to you.
a) has
b) will
c) is
d will have

17. I worked hard ---- my exams.
a) for pass
b) to pass
c) for passing
d) to passing

18. I---- to Africa on business.
a) am sent
b) be send
c) am send
d) am being sent

20. Unless he --- hard, he'll fail the exams.
a) worked
b) works
c) would work
d) will work
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jespah
 
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Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2021 08:49 am
@Peterobia,
These are mainly questions about tenses, or subject/verb agreement.

There are verb tenses that we use to express what happened in the past, and tenses to show what is happening today, and what will be happening in the future.

In the previous paragraph, I just showed you examples of all three for the verb to happen. Did you catch them all?

As for subject and verb agreement, in most languages there is some equivalent of first, second, and third person, and single and plural are also differentiated.

Consider pronouns first:

First person singular: I, me, my, mine, myself
First person plural: we, us, our, ours, ourselves
Second person singular and plural are mostly the same in English: you, your, yours, yourself (although the plural can be yourselves, plus there are parts of the US where there are slang plurals like y'all, youse, or yinz)
Third person singular: he, she, one, or it; him, her, one, it; his hers, one's, or its; himself, herself, oneself (sometimes written as one's self), or itself
Third person plural: they, them, their, theirs, theirselves

When gender is not known, or for transgender people, the pronoun they is often used as the first person singular. But for the most part, the list above will work.

Verbs in English just have single and plural. We don't change our verbs for gender. With very few exceptions, we also don't distinguish between first and second person. Your standard English verb goes like this:

First and second person singular: I live, I lived, you live, you lived
Third person singular: he lives, she lived, etc.
Plural: we live, they live, we lived, those girls lived, etc.

With some spelling exceptions (for example, we write said for the past tense of to say), you change all English verbs from singular to plural the same way.

One irregular verb in English is the verb to be.

First person singular: I am, I was, I have been
Second person singular and plural: you are, you were, you have been
Third person singular: he is, she was, it has been
First person singular: we are, we were, we have been
Third person plural: they are, they were, they have been

There's a lot more but this should get you started.

Now, how would you answer your test questions?
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2021 09:52 am
@jespah,
jespah wrote:


These are mainly questions about tenses, or subject/verb agreement.

There are verb tenses that we use to express what happened in the past, and tenses to show what is happening today, and what will be happening in the future.

In the previous paragraph, I just showed you examples of all three for the verb to happen. Did you catch them all?

As for subject and verb agreement, in most languages there is some equivalent of first, second, and third person, and single and plural are also differentiated.

Consider pronouns first:

First person singular: I, me, my, mine, myself
First person plural: we, us, our, ours, ourselves
Second person singular and plural are mostly the same in English: you, your, yours, yourself (although the plural can be yourselves, plus there are parts of the US where there are slang plurals like y'all, youse, or yinz)
Third person singular: he, she, one, or it; him, her, one, it; his hers, one's, or its; himself, herself, oneself (sometimes written as one's self), or itself
Third person plural: they, them, their, theirs, theirselves

When gender is not known, or for transgender people, the pronoun they is often used as the first person singular. But for the most part, the list above will work.

Verbs in English just have single and plural. We don't change our verbs for gender. With very few exceptions, we also don't distinguish between first and second person. Your standard English verb goes like this:

First and second person singular: I live, I lived, you live, you lived
Third person singular: he lives, she lived, etc.
Plural: we live, they live, we lived, those girls lived, etc.

With some spelling exceptions (for example, we write said for the past tense of to say), you change all English verbs from singular to plural the same way.

One irregular verb in English is the verb to be.

First person singular: I am, I was, I have been
Second person singular and plural: you are, you were, you have been
Third person singular: he is, she was, it has been
First person singular: we are, we were, we have been
Third person plural: they are, they were, they have been

There's a lot more but this should get you started.

Now, how would you answer your test questions?


Wow...devilishly clever, Jespah.

I hope he gets the message.
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