Reply Thu 20 Feb, 2020 01:15 pm
The real Tokyo Olympics: Esports and the future of Japanese soft power

Quote:
The Olympics have lodged into the popular consciousness as a symbol of pride; but also of Japan’s changing role in the world. If the 1964 Tokyo Games announced Japan’s rapid modernization, these Olympics aim to reposition Japan as a cultural, if no longer economic, superpower.

But there is another Olympics taking place in Tokyo, just before the traditional one. And this event has far more importance to the future of Japanese soft power. The Intel World Open will be the first major video game tournament of the decade held in Japan. Boasting official support from the International Olympic Committee, the Intel World Open hosts national teams from around the globe, just like the traditional Olympics. These nations will compete in two of the most popular titles in esports — Street Fighter and Rocket League — before crowning the medalists in Tokyo’s central Olympic Games area.

The event marks the first formal crossover between the Olympics and competitive video games. And the Intel World Open is critically important to Japan’s global influence, arguably more so than the Olympics themselves.


What sayeth you? Yay? Nay? Fiddlesticks?


More context on eSports:
Esports Evangelists Want To Bring Gaming To A Broader Audience
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Type: Discussion • Score: 7 • Views: 339 • Replies: 9
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McGentrix
 
  2  
Reply Thu 20 Feb, 2020 01:44 pm
Not just no, but **** NO!
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Feb, 2020 02:00 pm
@McGentrix,
We are of similar minds in this area.
0 Replies
 
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Feb, 2020 03:33 pm
@tsarstepan,
Say what?

Absolutely not! I shall not have the sanctity of The Olympics soiled by a separate competitor!

(the matter of my only having participated in a handful of video games has nothing to do with my views)
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Feb, 2020 06:15 am
@tsarstepan,
The Olympics has a history of peculiar events.

Quote:
The torrent of sports poetry inspired by the London Olympics continues unabated: NPR even hosted Poetry Games, in which listeners voted on a selection of verse with an athletic theme by celebrated poets from various countries. But few people today recall that poetry, just like the 100 meters, was an official Olympic competition from 1912 to 1948. Sadly, the names of the medal winners are not listed on the International Olympic Committee’s rosters. And many of the winning poems in the so-called Pentathlon of the Muses — which had to be “inspired by the idea of sport” — have mysteriously vanished as well, perhaps, as critics have suggested, because of their dubious literary quality.

Historians have searched in vain for ambitious works like “A Rider’s Instructions to His Lover,” for which the German equestrian poet Rudolf Binding won the silver medal in Amsterdam in 1928, or the French rugby champion Charles Gonnet’s zealous ode to ancient Greek athletes, “Before the Gods of Olympia” (bronze, Paris, 1924).

In the English language, the work whose loss has most vexed literary sports lovers is a paean to fencing, “Sword Songs,” by a British poet named Dorothy Margaret Stuart. Despite winning the silver medal at the hotly contested 1924 Paris Olympics, the verse sank into oblivion. The historian Bernhard Kramer in The Journal of Olympic History of 2004 was unable to trace the author, apart from noting that she had lived in Kew in Surrey and had once written a “moving lyric” about her dog, Mungo.


https://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/12/sports/olympics/when-poetry-was-an-olympic-event.html

Live pigeon shooting was also an event.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Fri 21 Feb, 2020 06:15 am
@tsarstepan,
The Olympics has a history of peculiar events.

Quote:
The torrent of sports poetry inspired by the London Olympics continues unabated: NPR even hosted Poetry Games, in which listeners voted on a selection of verse with an athletic theme by celebrated poets from various countries. But few people today recall that poetry, just like the 100 meters, was an official Olympic competition from 1912 to 1948. Sadly, the names of the medal winners are not listed on the International Olympic Committee’s rosters. And many of the winning poems in the so-called Pentathlon of the Muses — which had to be “inspired by the idea of sport” — have mysteriously vanished as well, perhaps, as critics have suggested, because of their dubious literary quality.

Historians have searched in vain for ambitious works like “A Rider’s Instructions to His Lover,” for which the German equestrian poet Rudolf Binding won the silver medal in Amsterdam in 1928, or the French rugby champion Charles Gonnet’s zealous ode to ancient Greek athletes, “Before the Gods of Olympia” (bronze, Paris, 1924).

In the English language, the work whose loss has most vexed literary sports lovers is a paean to fencing, “Sword Songs,” by a British poet named Dorothy Margaret Stuart. Despite winning the silver medal at the hotly contested 1924 Paris Olympics, the verse sank into oblivion. The historian Bernhard Kramer in The Journal of Olympic History of 2004 was unable to trace the author, apart from noting that she had lived in Kew in Surrey and had once written a “moving lyric” about her dog, Mungo.


https://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/12/sports/olympics/when-poetry-was-an-olympic-event.html

Live pigeon shooting was also an event.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Feb, 2020 09:37 am
I say nay as well.

As an aside - just down the street from me they opened up this big eSports place - I met the owners of it - and they were telling me how huge this is becoming.

When I first saw this (had no idea what eSports was) and I am reading their signs talking of coaching, tournaments, etc. And I am thinking hmm must be some sort of new sport/fitness technique. Then I met the owners - and I am thinking --- no interest.
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Feb, 2020 09:43 am
Somehow I can't see this being the key to Japan's soft power in the world. Any country can make a great video game.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Feb, 2020 12:23 pm
Why not? the Olympics have pretty much turned into a dirty $/propoganda machine, what's one more side-gig?
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Fri 21 Feb, 2020 11:57 pm
I wouldn't mind watching a steam of a gold medal winning World of Warcraft raid.
0 Replies
 
 

 
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